This is a question that more than 6507 of our readers have been asking us! Luckily, we have found the most appropriate information for you!

Today’s Wonder of the Day will likely generate definite responses among our Wonder Friends. Most kids either love or hate snakes. Very few people have a lukewarm attitude toward snakes.

Although reports of large snakes are notorious for exaggerations , the longest pythons easily stretch over 28 feet! Although not native to North America, the Burmese python has become an invasivespecies in parts of the Everglades National Park in Florida. As large as anacondas and pythons are, though, they look absolutely tiny compared to the largest snake that ever lived on Earth. Putting it in perspective , scientists believe Titanoboa was as long as a bus, heavier than a bison and could easily eat something the size of a cow!

Which is bigger python or anaconda?

Anaconda is the heaviest and the biggest snake in the world. On the other hand, the python is no doubt the longest snake in the world. An anaconda can weigh as much as 550 pounds or more and can grow up to 25 feet. … However, a 20-foot anaconda will outweigh a much longer python.

Where is the largest snake in the world?

Growing up to 30 feet long, the reticulated python (Python reticulatus) of southeastern Asia and the East Indies is the longest snake in the world.

Can an anaconda eat a human?

Adults are able to consume much larger animals, including deer, capybara, caimans and large birds. Females will sometimes cannibalize males, especially during breeding season. Due to their size, green anacondas are one of the few snakes capable of consuming a human, however this is extremely rare.

Who is bigger Titanoboa or anaconda?

Using the length-weight ratios of a rock python and an anaconda as a guide, Head estimated that Titanoboa weighed in at over 1.3 tons. That’s almost thirty times as heavy as the anaconda, the bulkiest species alive today.

A member of the boa family, South America’s green anaconda is, pound for pound, the largest snake in the world. Its cousin, the reticulated python, can reach slightly greater lengths, but the enormous girth of the anaconda makes it almost twice as heavy.

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The largest living snakes in the world, measured either by length or by weight, are various members of the Boidae and Pythonidae families. They include anacondas, pythons and boa constrictors, which are all non-venomous constrictors. The longest venomous snake, with a length up to 18.5–18.8 ft (5.6–5.7 m), is the king cobra,[1] and the heaviest venomous snake is likely to be the Gaboon viper (which also has the longest fangs and delivers the largest amount of venom) or possibly the Eastern diamondback rattlesnake – all three of which reach maximum weights in the range of 6–20 kilograms (13–44 lb).

Pending the acceptance of its taxonomic status, the Bolivian anaconda ( Eunectes beniensis ) may also merit inclusion, and the northern and southern variations of African rock python could be considered separately. [6] In spite of what has been, for many years, a standing offer of a large financial reward (initially $1,000 offered by U.S. President Theodore Roosevelt in the early 1900s, [7] later raised to $5,000, then $15,000 in 1978 and $50,000 in 1980) for a live, healthy snake over 30 ft (9.1 m) long by the New York Zoological Society (later renamed as the Wildlife Conservation Society), no attempt to claim the reward has ever been made. Although it is generally accepted that the reticulated python is the world’s longest snake, most length estimates longer than 6.35 m (20 ft 10 in) have been called into question. [6] It has been suggested that confident length records for the largest snakes must be established from a dead body soon after death, or alternatively from a heavily sedated snake, using a steel tape and in the presence of witnesses, and must be published (and preferably recorded on video). [6] Wild caught non-native (invasive) Burmese Python (Python bivittatus) female♀ 5.715 m (18 feet 9 inches) 47.1736 kilograms (104 lbs) caught in Miami-Dade county near the L-28 Tieback Canal, around 35 miles west of Miami by Ryan Ausburn and Kevin Pavlidis, October 2, 2020. [42] [43] [44] Wild caught non-native (invasive) Burmese Python (Python bivittatus) female♀ 5.563 meters (18 feet 3 inches) 60.3 kilograms (133 lbs) caught by University of Florida wildlife biologist Ed Metzger III Shark Valley, Everglades National Park, Miami Dade County, Florida, July 9, 2015. “Medusa” a captive Reticulated Python (Malayopython reticulatus) female♀ 7.67 meters (25 feet 2 inches) 158.8 kilograms (350 lbs) “Medusa” held at The Edge of Hell haunted house attraction in Kansas City, Missouri, last officially measured 2011. [48] [49] Wild caught Reticulated Python (Malayopython reticulatus) Female♀ 7.5 meters (24 feet and 7.2756 inches) adjusted post mortem measurement. Originally measured alive at 8 meters (26 feet 3 inches unknown method, unreliable) 250 kilograms (550 pounds, estimated weight upon capture, unreliable) caught April 7, 2016 Paya Terubong district, Penang Island, Malaysia. Died April 10, 2016 [50] [51] [52] “Fluffy” a captive Reticulated Python (Malayopython reticulatus) female♀ 7.3 meters (24 feet) 136 Kilograms (300 pounds). “Fluffy” last officially measured live on 30 September 30, 2009. died at the Columbus Zoo and Aquarium, Powell, Ohio, on October 26, 2010 due to an apparent tumor. [15] [13] “Colossus” a captive Reticulated Python (Maylayopython reticulatus) male♂, skeletal measurement 6.35 meters (20 feet 10 inches) 133.7 kilograms (295 pounds) “Colossus” held at Highland Park Zoo, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, died April 1963, deposited at Carnegie Museum. Living in captivity at the National Aquarium in Al Qana, Abu Dhabi, the 14-year-old female♀ was 7 metres (22 feet 11 inches)long and weighed 115 kg (255 pounds) [18] [19] [20] “Predation on Sun Bears by Reticulated Python in East Kalimantan, Indonesian Borneo” . The life history of the green anaconda ( Eunectes murinus ), with emphasis on its reproductive Biology (PDF) ( Ph.D. thesis). Fluffy: Guinness record-holding reticulated python, 24 feet long, dies at Columbus Zoo” . (1966), “A contribution to the herpetology of West Pakistan” , Bulletin of the American Museum of Natural History , 134 (2): 117–118, hdl : 2246/1129 . The Completely Illustrated Atlas of Reptiles and Amphibians for the Terrarium (originally published in German in 1984 as Lexicon der Terraristik und Herpetologie by Edition Leipzig) . “Genetic population structure of the yellow anaconda (Eunectes notaeus) in Northern Argentina: management implications”. ^ Boa Constrictor Fact Sheet – Woodland Park Zoo Seattle WA . ^ Murphy, John C. “De Schauensee’s Anaconda, Eunectes deschauenseei (Dunn and Conant)” . ^ a b Murphy, John C. “Papuan Olive Python, Simalia papuana (Peters and Doria, 1878)” .

Massive Size

Green anacondas can grow to more than 29 feet, weigh more than 550 pounds, and measure more than 12 inches in diameter. Females are significantly larger than males. Other anaconda species, all from South America and all smaller than the green anaconda, are the yellow, dark-spotted, and Bolivian varieties.

On Land and in Water

Anacondas live in swamps, marshes, and slow-moving streams, mainly in the tropical rain forests of the Amazon and Orinoco basins. They are cumbersome on land, but stealthy and sleek in the water. Their eyes and nasal openings are on top of their heads, allowing them to lay in wait for prey while remaining nearly completely submerged.

Diet and Hunting

They reach their monumental size on a diet of wild pigs, deer, birds, turtles, capybara, caimans, and even jaguars. Anacondas are nonvenomous constrictors, coiling their muscular bodies around captured prey and squeezing until the animal asphyxiates. Jaws attached by stretchy ligaments allow them to swallow their prey whole, no matter the size, and they can go weeks or months without food after a big meal.

List of largest snakes

The largest living snakes in the world, measured either by length or by weight, are various members of the Boidae and Pythonidae families. They include anacondas, pythons and boa constrictors, which are all non-venomous constrictors. The longestThere are eleven living snakes, listed below according to their maximum known or reported mass, that have a maximum mass that may reach or exceed 50 pounds (23 kg). Pending the acceptance of its taxonomic status, the Bolivian anaconda (In terms of length, in addition to those listed here, there are two other species that may possibly reach a length of 20 feet (6.1 m) or more – the Oenpelli python (It is important to be aware that there is considerable variation in the maximum reported size of these species, and most measurements are not truly verifiable, so the sizes listed should not be considered definitive. In general, the reported lengths are likely to be somewhat overestimated.Although it is generally accepted that the reticulated python is the world’s longest snake, most length estimates longer than 6.35 m (20 ft 10 in) have been called into question.