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Cats may press their head against a hard wall or other stationary object randomly. This is different than merely rubbing their head against something, head pressing is more forceful and is often repeated many times a day. If your cat begins this behavior, it is time to see your veterinarian for an examination and diagnosis.

Rated as moderate conditon3 Veterinary Answers Prepare for unexpected vet bills Cats exhibit a variety of behaviors as they grow and mature. Head pressing in cats is often a compulsive act many owners consider cute. Compare plans Head Pressing Average Cost Head pressing is just one symptom that occurs with some neurological problems. Pacing Circling Vision problems Seizures Slowed reflexes Head injuries from pressing head into objects forcefully Sores on feet from pacing There are a variety of medical conditions that can cause your cat to begin head pressing. Brain tumors are a primary cause of head pressing in cats. Those that begin elsewhere in the body and spread to the brain are called secondary tumors. In addition to head pressing, cats with brain tumors may also have seizures and tenderness around the skull. Cats with metabolic diseases such as hypoglycemia may exhibit head pressing. Cats can get into a number of toxic substances in and around the house that can cause many symptoms, including pressing the head. In addition, they can also cause immunodeficiencies, cancer, liver disease and other neurological problems. Liver shunts are not common in cats, but when they occur head pressing may follow along with them. Cats that have this condition have impeded blood flow to the liver. This disease primarily affects the forebrain and thalamus of the cat’s brain. Your cat can acquire serious infections that can cause head pressing as a primary symptoms. Your veterinarian will need to ask you some questions in order to diagnose your cat. Blood work may also be performed to determine if any infection or toxins are present. A urinalysis may be performed to determine if any metabolic conditions are responsible for symptoms. Diagnostic tests such as a CT scan or MRI may reveal any brain tumors. The treatment of head pressing in cats depends on the condition causing it. Serious issues such as brain tumors, liver shunts or encephalitis may require surgery and hospitalization. If your doctor finds your cat has a metabolic disorder he may treat him with medications on an outpatient basis. Cats that have serious or life-threatening conditions such as a liver shunt, may not be good candidates for treatment. Your doctor may recommend euthanasia as the most humane form of treatment in these cases. Obtaining an accurate diagnosis is the key to treating this condition. Once a diagnosis has been made, your doctor can move forward with treatment as needed. The length of recovery from head pressing depends on the cause of the condition and the treatment your doctor uses. If a diagnosis cannot be made, your cat may continue to exhibit this behavior. Cats that have surgery will need several weeks to recover and may require follow-up treatment with your doctor. Your doctor will also give you detailed instructions on how to manage your cat’s condition as he ages. may collect a share of sales or other compensation from the links on this page. (Sorry for my bad english)
My cat started head pressing this morning. Whilst liver and kidney disease may lead to head pressing; other causes including some viral infections, neurological conditions, cancer, poisoning among other causes may also lead to head pressing. I’m not aware of a dietary link to head pressing, but it is always worth changing to be sure and a restricted ingredient diet would be best.

How can I tell if my cat is head pressing?

Pacing..Circling..Vision problems..Seizures..Slowed reflexes..Head injuries from pressing head into objects forcefully..Sores on feet from pacing.

What does head pressing mean in cats?

According to the PetMD website, head pressing is defined as “ the compulsive act of pressing the head against a wall or other object for no apparent reason.” This can occur in dogs and cats of any breed or age, and can be a sign of damage to the nervous system, specifically the forebrain and thalamus (called …

Why do cats sleep with their head pressed against something?

Why a Cat Might Press Their Head Against Something While Sleeping. … Some cats will perform a head pressing behavior as they curl up to go to sleep to mark their territory. Cats have scent glands on their cheeks and this head rubbing behavior allows them to mark their territory and take ownership.

When cats push their heads into you?

When a cat rubs or pushes its head against you, also known as head butting or bunting, the cat is also marking you with his scent in a show of affiliation, Borns-Weil says. Affiliative behaviors serve to maintain a connection within a group of individuals.

Head pressing is characterized by the compulsive act of pressing the head against a wall or other object for no apparent reason. This generally indicates damage to the nervous system, which may result from a number of varying causes, including prosencephalon disease (in which the forebrain and thalamus parts of the brain are damaged), or toxic poisoning.

The act of head pressing is just one sign of prosencephalon disease, in which the forebrain and thalamus parts of the brain are affected. Other symptoms that may accompany this include compulsive pacing and circling, changes in learned (trained) behavior, seizures, damaged reflexes, and visual problems. There are a number of reasons for why a cat may feel the need to press its head, depending on the primary cause that is leading to this symptom. One primary diagnostic procedure in cases of head pressing includes a fundic examination of the retina and other structures in the back of the eye, which may indicate infectious or inflammatory diseases, as well as reveal irregularities in the brain.

There are times when cats will do things that leave us guessing. All cat owners can agree with that. But sometimes, your cat can display a behavior that is not only odd, but can also be a startling sign that something is definitely not right with your feline friend. Head pressing–not in a sweet way like head bunting, but against a hard surface like a wall–is most definitely a sign that something is very wrong with your cat. Here we’ve covered what to look for should this occur and what to do to save their life.

Please note: Immediately upon reading this, if your cat is dealing with this issue, please seek medical attention. If your cat consciously and continually presses their head against a wall or a hard surface, this action can be directly associated with damage to their nervous system. Along with this sudden need for blatant head pressing, there are some other signs and triggers that your cat may be experiencing damage to their nervous system. Compulsive pacing and circling, changes in learned (trained) behavior, seizures, damaged reflexes, and visual problems. Check out this video from Dr. Karen Becker, a proactive and integrative wellness veterinarian: In layman’s terms, head pressing in cats is caused by something that interferes with the proper functioning of the brain. Because of these serious conditions, it’s literally imperative that you get your cat to their local veterinarian at the first sign of any of these symptoms. -A fundic examination of the retina and other structures in the back of the eye, which may indicate infectious or inflammatory diseases, as well as reveal irregularities in the brain. Before and during the examination, your veterinarian or their staff should be asking you several questions relating to your cat’s general health. REMEMBER: ADOPT, DON’T SHOP; FOSTERING SAVES LIVES & SPAY AND NEUTER!

You may have seen images circulating around the internet of cats with their heads pressed against a wall or against the floor with funny text that says something like “I can’t do Mondays”. While these pictures may seem funny at first, these cats are actually exhibiting a behavior called “head pressing”, and it’s no joke.

Head pressing in cats is a sign of damage to the nervous system. Abnormal vocalization Compulsive pacing and circling Changes in behavior Seizures Disorientation Visual impairment Damaged reflexes Head trauma Brain or skull tumors Stroke Toxic poisoning Prosencephalon disease (in which the forebrain and thalamus parts of the brain are damaged) Encephalitis (inflammation of the brain and spinal cord) Liver shunt Metabolic disorder Hepatic encephalopathy (metabolic disorder as result of liver disease) Infection of the nervous system (parasites, rabies, bacterial, viral, or fungal infection) After reading all of this scary information, you may be feeling pretty worried about your cat. We’ll perform a series of tests to diagnose and treat the issue. Dr. Nesbitt is not only extremely qualified, but she also takes a vested interest in the well-being your kitty.

Pressing the Head Against Objects in Cats

Head pressing is characterized by the compulsive act of pressing the head against a wall or other object for no apparent reason. This generally indicates damage to the nervous system, which may result from a number of varying causes, including prosencephalon disease (in which the forebrain and thalamus parts of the brain are damaged), or toxic poisoning.There is no evidence that any certain cat breed or age-range is at greater risk for this condition.

Symptoms and Types

The act of head pressing is just one sign of prosencephalon disease, in which the forebrain and thalamus parts of the brain are affected. Other symptoms that may accompany this include compulsive pacing and circling, changes in learned (trained) behavior, seizures, damaged reflexes, and visual problems. Some of these symptoms may lead to lesions, for example, sores on the feet as a result of compulsive pacing, or injuries to the face/head as a result of pressing the head against a surface for long periods of time.

Causes

There are a number of reasons for why a cat may feel the need to press its head, depending on the primary cause that is leading to this symptom. Possible causes may be a metabolic disorder, such as hyper or hyponatremia (too much, or too little sodium in the body’s blood plasma), a primary or secondary tumor (meaning a tumor located in the brain vs. a tumor located elsewhere in the body), or an infection of the nervous system, such as rabies or fungal infection. Other causes can include head trauma, such as from a car accident, or from exposure to toxins, such as lead.

Diagnosis

One primary diagnostic procedure in cases of head pressing includes a fundic examination of the retina and other structures in the back of the eye, which may indicate infectious or inflammatory diseases, as well as reveal irregularities in the brain. Other likely tests are blood pressure measurements to test for high blood pressure, and computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans of the brain. Your veterinarian will also include a urine analysis (which may reveal a problem with the metabolic system), and tests for blood lead concentration (which can indicate toxins in the system).You will need to give a thorough history of your cat’s health, the onset of symptoms, and possible incidents that might have preceded this condition.

Treatment

Care is dependent on the symptoms that appear and the diagnosis your veterinarian settles on. Severe clinical signs will require hospitalization and immediate treatment. Different causes require different treatment, and no drugs or therapies should be administered until a diagnosis has been reached.