What Foods Can Guinea Pigs Eat?

Just because you love your guinea pig as much as family doesnt mean you can feed her straight from your table. While some human food is safe for your guinea pig to eat, feeding guinea pigs should involve far more care than just giving them table scraps.

Any guinea pig owner needs to keep two important things in mind when choosing food: Guinea pig pellets should include Vitamin C to keep your pet healthy.

Most owners will opt to feed their guinea pigs store-bought pellets and hay. Some alfalfa hay is acceptable but it contains too much calcium to be the main part of your pets diet. Guinea pig hay needs to be stored in a cool, dry place to stay clear of mold or mildew.

Opt for plain pellets rather than a mix, as this prevents your guinea pig from just picking out the tasty bits and ignoring the healthy ones! Fresh fruits and veggies are great treats and supplements for your guinea pig. Always be sure to clean up any uneaten fresh foods at the end of the day to avoid mold or rot.

Always avoid feeding your guinea pig sweet or salty human junk food, even if none of the ingredients are toxic. Its generally best to stick to feeding your guinea pig a diet of hay and high-quality pellets, with occasional treats of fresh fruits and veggies.

What foods are bad for guinea pigs?

Make sure you do not feed your guinea pigs the following foods (this is not an exhaustive list): cereals; grains ; nuts; seeds; dried beans, corn, and peas; buttercups; garden shrubs (such as hemlock or privet); lilies of any kind; sweet peas; nightshade; oak; avocado; onion grass; onions; potato tops; mushrooms; …

What are guinea pigs favorite food?

Each guinea pig is different, and most will have their own favorites. Most of them love carrots and broccoli, and some love nothing better than fresh grass nibbled from a lawn.

What can I feed my guinea pig if I run out of food?

Feed your guinea pig about a cup (per pig) of fresh vegetables daily. Pigs enjoy variety, and need a balanced diet, but look to give them vegetables and fruits high in vitamin C. Fresh bell pepper, kale, parsley, cilantro, and cabbage can be good ideas.

Guinea pigs don’t usually overeat, but it’s important to provide the proper balance of pellets, hay and fresh vegetables. Like human beings, guinea pigs cannot make their own vitamin C, so they require vitamin C-rich foods in their daily diet.

If your guinea pig develops loose stool, reduce the amount of fresh produce for several days, then reintroduce it in smaller portions. Read a more detailed explanation and consult a veterinarian who specializes in guinea pigs with specific questions about diet.

Your pig will be perfectly happy with high quality pellets and hay and treats of fruits and vegetables. For a special snack, try mixing some rolled oats into your guinea pigs pellets or stuff a small cardboard tube with fresh hay. Spot clean your guinea pig’s food bowl as needed throughout the week if they kick bedding or droppings into it.

The steady amount of produce in your guinea pig’s diet means that you need to be conscientious about removing uneaten fruits, veggies and other perishable foods before they spoil.

Guinea pigs are natural herbivores and would spend their time foraging and grazing in small herds in the wild. They need to be fed the types of food they have adapted to eat. Their teeth are continuously growing, which is one of the reasons why they need plenty of roughage to chew; this wears down their teeth and helps prevent serious dental problems. Providing sufficient fibre in their diet is also very important for both their gastrointestinal system and general health.

Some examples of these include dark leafed lettuce varieties such as rocket, dandelion greens, snow peas, and herbs such as marjoram, borage, marigold, nasturtium, rosemary, parsley, coriander, basil, and dill. Other foods that are good to fed guinea pigs a few times a week include broccoli, cabbage, endive, carrot tops, Brussels sprouts, kale, silver beet, mint, and fruits such as apples (but with no seeds), mango, and papaya.

Guinea pigs are always eating. Whether its pellets, grass hay, daily greens, or the occasional fruit snack, it may often seem like your guinea pig is born to eat (and create magic beans).

There are so many types of fruits, vegetables, and herbs that guinea pigs can eat. Which vegetables , fruits , and herbs are safe to feed your guinea pig?

Are the foods you have been giving your cavy guinea pig safe ? Besides water , hay , and pellets , what else can your guinea pig eat? First, lets take a look at the basics of a guinea pig diet or jump to What The Happy Cavy Herd Eats for a general guide on the daily dietary requirements of guinea pigs.

Hay delivers the fiber that that is essential for your guinea pig to be able to properly digest and proces food and nutrients. Without a constant intake of fresh hay, guinea pigs digestive tracks can shut down. High-quality hay should be green with pliable stalks, free of mold and foreign particulates, and fragrant (not dusty or void of smell).

Cheap, store-bought hay is no substitute for fresh, high-quality yummy goodness. Most hay purchased at big box stores (PetCo, etc.) Farm-to-cage is ideal and special caution should be taken when providing the most important food of your guinea pigs diet: high-quality, pesticide(?)

NOTE : An alfalfa hay mix (1/2 timothy, 1/2 alfalfa) should be primarily fed to young guinea pigs under the age of 4 months and pregnant or nursing cavies. Because alfalfa hay is high in calcium, it should NOT be fed to healthy, adult cavies. Guinea pig pellets should consist of only high-quality hay and should be served in a ceramic bowl, which is large enough to not tip over.

High-quality grass hay is a must for proper guinea pig health. Like Humans, guinea pigs cannot manufacture their own vitamin C. To prevent survy and other health issues, each guinea pig should get 10 to 30 milligrams of Vitamin C each day; young, ill, nursing and/or pregnant animals require extra Vitamin C. While many guinea pigs will get an adequate serving of Vitamin C from vegetables and pellets, you may wish to supplement your cavys diet with a small amount of Vitamin C, either in power or tablet form. Guinea should be fed only up to 1 cup (240 mL) each (adults) of vegetables per day.

Please remember that your guinea pigs food supply should NOT be mainly vegetables. Foods high in calcium can lead to the formation of bladder stones and other health issues. To help you find which vegetables, herbs, and fruits are safe to feed your guinea pig, please refer to the Guinea Pig Food List below.

NOTE : Always introduce new foods to your guinea pig slowly and patiently. Begin introducing new foods by providing a small piece or two during the first try. Then, portions of a particular guinea pig safe food may be increased slightly with each subsequent serving.

Guinea pigs have a sensitive digestive system which is easily upset. Share This Guinea Pig Nutrition & Diet Info Click a letter to view that vegetable and refer to the Notes for cautionary advice.

Information on this chart is derived from the USDA Nutrient Database , from SR22 to SR25 datasets. This chart takes into consideration several factors to arrive at our feeding frequency suggestions: sugar, calcium, phosphorous, Vitamin C, Vitamin A, oxalic acid content, and calcium to phosphorous (Ca:P) ratio. Chemical composition can be referenced at the USDA Nutrient Database .

Alfalfa pellets 02200 Alfalfa pellets are suitable for young, growing and/or pregnant guinea pigs (under 1 year of age).Ref. Beet greens/leaves(beetroot greens/leaves) 30.00117.00 Beets (beetroot) 4.9016.00 Bell pepper See Peppers (capscium) Blackberries 21.0032.00 Blueberries 9.76.00 Feed in moderation. Broccoli raab, rabe, rapini 93.0048.00 May cause gas or bloating.

Broccolini 93.0048.00 Stems are liked better than flowers Brussels sprouts 85.0042.00 May cause gas or bloating. Carrots, top greens unknownunknown Unknown nutrient makeup. Cauliflower / Broccoflower 46.4022.00 Celery 7.0040.00 Choking hazard.

Cherries (without pits) sour 10.0016.00 Cherries (without pits) sweet 7.0013.00 Chicory, greens 24.00100.00 Chicory, witloof 2.8019.00 ** Cilantro (corriander)27.0067.00 Feed in moderation. Corn on the cob (1 med ear) 6.102.00 May cause gas or bloating. Cress, garden 69.0081.00 Cucumber with peel 5.3014.00 Dandelion Greens 35.00187.00 Dill 85.00208.00 Eggplant 6.56.5 Elderberries 36.0038.00 Feed in small amounts.

Grapefruit, white 37.0015.00 Sour foods can cause mouth sores. Honeydew 120.00135.00See Melon honeydew Kale 120.00135.00 Kiwifruit, fuzzy (kiwi or kiwi fruit) 92.7034.00 Remove brown, fuzzy skin. Nectarine 5.405.00 ** Okra 21.1081.00 Orange 53.2040.00 Citrus can cause mouth sores.

Papaya 61.8024.00 ** Parsley (curly or flat) 133.00138.00 Parsnip 17.0036.00 Passionfruit, purple 30.0012.00 Peach 6.605.00 Peas, edible-podded 40.0025.00 Pears Asian 3.804.00 Pears European 6.6018.15 Peppermint 31.8243.00 Peppers (capscium), sweet green 80.4010.00 May cause gas or bloating. Peppers (capscium), sweet orange 146.70.00 May cause gas or bloating. Peppers (capscium), sweet red 127.707.00 May cause gas or bloating.

Peppers (capscium), sweet yellow 183.5011.00 May cause gas or bloating. Plum 9.504.00 Pumpkin 11.0039.00 High in Vitamin A. Pumpkin Leaves 11.0039.00 High in Vitamin A. Quince 15.0011.00 Radicchio 8.0019.00 Radishes 14.8025.00 Raspberries 26.0025.00 Raspberry leaves (from raspberry plant) 25.0022.00 Spearmint 13.3199.00 Feed in very small amounts ** Spinach 28.1099.00 May cause gas or bloating. # Tomato, red, cherry tomatoes 19.105.00Avoid leaves and stems (poisonous) See Dangerous Food List Turnip greens 60.00190.00 Watercress 43.00120.00 Watermelon See Melon watermelon Watermelon rind Vitamin & mineral content unknown.

# Vitamin C values for tomatoes differ depending on variety and season. ** Contains oxalic acid which may contribute to the formation of bladder stones. HappyCavy is the Internet’s only 4-webcam broadcast inside the lives of a female guinea pig herd from Portland, Oregon.

Diet What are good veggies and fruits to feed my guinea pigs

When Should I Feed My Guinea Pig?

At the most basic level, guinea pigs are herbivores. That means that they just eat fruits and veggies—no dairy, eggs, meat, or insects for these little guys. Fresh hay and fresh leafy vegetables should make up the bulk of your guinea pig’s diet.Any guinea pig owner needs to keep two important things in mind when choosing food:That said, it’s also important not to transition your guinea pig’s diet too quickly. If needed, be sure to go slow while you transition your guinea pig from her original diet in her old home or from the pet store to a healthier diet.You might also catch your guinea pig eating her own poop, but don’t be alarmed! Guinea pigs actually produce two different types of feces. One is soft and nutritious, and the guinea pigs re-ingest this to get more nutrients. Rabbits do the same thing!The other type of poop is harder and is produced after the food has been digested twice. That’s the poop that you clean up when you clean your guinea pig’s cage!

Feeding Guinea Pigs Store-Bought Food

Most owners will opt to feed their guinea pigs store-bought pellets and hay. Be sure to purchase pellets that are specifically formulated for guinea pigs.For hay, a mix of timothy, orchard, and oat is best. Some alfalfa hay is acceptable but it contains too much calcium to be the main part of your pet’s diet. Guinea pig hay needs to be stored in a cool, dry place to stay clear of mold or mildew.Supplement your guinea pig’s hay with a small amount of high-quality pellets. Opt for plain pellets rather than a mix, as this prevents your guinea pig from just picking out the tasty bits and ignoring the healthy ones!

How much to feed

Guinea pigs don’t usually overeat, but it’s important to provide the proper balance of pellets, hay and fresh vegetables. Like human beings, guinea pigs cannot make their own vitamin C, so they require vitamin C-rich foods in their daily diet.Guinea Pig Hay on Amazon.comGuinea Pig Pellets on Amazon.comFruit works well as an occasional treat that is offered once a day or several times a week. Keep the portion size small since fruit is high in sugar; a small wedge of orange or apple, several blueberries or a thin slice of banana is perfectly adequate. Kiwis, strawberries and citrus have high levels of vitamin C.Introduce new fruits and veggies gradually to avoid diarrhea. If your guinea pig develops loose stool, reduce the amount of fresh produce for several days, then reintroduce it in smaller portions.

Time for treats

There are a variety of commercial treats marketed for guinea pigs and other small animals. Loaded with artificial sweeteners such as high fructose corn syrup, fructose or sucrose, they provide little nutritional value and lots of empty calories.Commercial treats are unnecessary and a waste of money. Your pig will be perfectly happy with high quality pellets and hay and treats of fruits and vegetables. For a special snack, try mixing some rolled oats into your guinea pig’s pellets or stuff a small cardboard tube with fresh hay.Sign up to receive our exclusive e-book full of training techniques, problem-solving and important information about caring for your pet.

Multivitamins and mineral wheels

Mulitvitamins and mineral or salt wheels are marketed as supplements to your guinea pig’s diet, and the wheels are also advertised as outlets for gnawing. But if you’re feeding your guinea pig a varied and well-balanced diet, these products shouldn’t be necessary.The glues and adhesives that hold mineral and salt wheels together may be harmful. Furthermore, the bleaching process for salt wheels introduces unnecessary chemicals into your pig’s diet. Although there isn’t consensus on these products, they should be considered a low priority when considering how best to spend your pet supply budget.

A delish dish

Opt for a ceramic food dish rather than a plastic one. Ceramic dishes are sturdy, chew-resistant and difficult to overturn. They’re also durable and shouldn’t need to be replaced unless they become cracked or chipped.Look for a wide, shallow bowl. Many guinea pigs like to place their front feet on the rim of their food bowl when they eat and this design will lessen the chances that the bowl (and your pig!) could be upended.Spot clean your guinea pig’s food bowl as needed throughout the week if they kick bedding or droppings into it. Wash the bowl with soapy water and rinse and dry thoroughly during the weekly cage cleaning.Guinea Pig Bowls on Amazon.com

Water

A constant fresh source of fresh (preferably filtered but NOT distilled) clean, room-temperature water is an absolute must.Water bottles should be emptied, rinsed, and re-filled each day.

Grass Hay

High-quality grass hay (such as timothy hay) should be available at all times for your guinea pig. Hay delivers the fiber that that is essential for your guinea pig to be able to properly digest and proces food and nutrients. Without a constant intake of fresh hay, guinea pigs’ digestive tracks can shut down. Plus, hay helps guinea pigs keep their teeth clean prevents their teeth from growing too long.How do you know if hay is high-quality? High-quality hay should be green with pliable stalks, free of mold and foreign particulates, and fragrant (not dusty or void of smell).Most hay purchased at “big box” stores (PetCo, etc.) is NOT high-quality hay. Farm-to-cage is ideal and special caution should be taken when providing the most important food of your guinea pig’s diet: high-quality, pesticide(?) free hay.

Pellets

Provide your guinea pig with about 1/4 – 1/8 cup of plain, corn- and seed-free guinea pig pellets for eating each day.Guinea pig pellets should consist of only high-quality hay and should be served in a ceramic bowl, which is large enough to not tip over.

Vitamin C

Like Humans, guinea pigs cannot manufacture their own vitamin C. To prevent survy and other health issues, each guinea pig should get 10 to 30 milligrams of Vitamin C each day; young, ill, nursing and/or pregnant animals require extra Vitamin C. While many guinea pigs will get an adequate serving of Vitamin C from vegetables and pellets, you may wish to supplement your cavy’s diet with a small amount of Vitamin C, either in power or tablet form.

Vegetables, Herbs, & Other Foods

To help you find which vegetables, herbs, and fruits are safe to feed your guinea pig, please refer to the

Help Us Maintain The Food List!

There are so many foods a guinea pig can eat. If you know of a food that is not included in this list which you think we should add, please let us know!
ThenClick a letter to view that vegetable and refer to the “Notes” for cautionary advice.Information on this chart is derived from the USDA Nutrient Database, from SR22 to SR25 datasets. Information may have changed since the publication of this chart.This chart takes into consideration several factors to arrive at our feeding frequency suggestions: sugar, calcium, phosphorous, Vitamin C, Vitamin A, oxalic acid content, and calcium to phosphorous (Ca:P) ratio. Not all fields are displayed due to space requirements. Chemical composition can be referenced at the USDA Nutrient Database.