What Food Category Is Eggs?

I bet if I asked you, can eggs part of a healthy, well-balanced diet, you’d agree. Less well known are the details like how many eggs make a serving and how many servings are recommended each day. That’s because for many of us the last time we really looked at Canada’s Food Guide might have been back in fifth grade health! As a dietitian, the Food Guide is often the backbone of my healthy eating advice. Heres a quick review of how eggs fit.

A 4 year old child may have one egg at lunch and a few fork fulls (1/4 cup) of fish at dinner.

What is an Egg classified as?

According to the U.S. Department of Agriculture, dairy refers to “all fluid milk products and foods made from milk.” This includes milk, yogurt, cheese, ice cream, and butter. Eggs are not included. … Eggs, on the other hand, come from chickens, which are classified as birds. This content is imported from Giphy.

Are eggs carbohydrates?

Egg / Has Carbohydrate

Eggs come from chickens. Then why do we think they’re a dairy product? Maybe it’s because of the old-school teachings that eggs should be grouped with milk and cheese when figuring out recommended daily allowances (RDA). Or perhaps it’s their location in the grocery storeshelved next to other dairy items like butter, yogurt, and cheesethat adds to the confusion. The speculation could also be attributed to the similarity between the terms “dairy product” and “animal byproduct.” Still, despite the reason for the common misconception, eggs are not a dairy product. Dairy products consist of food sources produced by animals with mammary glands like cows, goats, and sheep. And while eggs are, indeed, an animal product, the USDA’s food pyramid groups them as a source of protein, similar to meat, poultry, fish, nuts, and beans.

Some things are ingrained in your head from childhood: The sky is blue, grass is green, milk will make you grow big and strong. Others, like why the sky is blue, fall into a grey area. We think we know the answer, but could we explain it to a five-year-old? Probably not. Such is the case with this seemingly straightforward question: Are eggs dairy? If the question gives you pause, you’re not alone. Let’s break it down.

Dairy and Egg Allergies

Some people choose not to consume dairy products due to a myriad of reasons, including food sensitivities, dietary restrictions, and ethical beliefs. Eggs sometimes fall under this umbrella, too. However, individuals who suffer from milk allergies, or are “lactose intolerant,” can generally eat eggs without experiencing the negative results associated with a dairy allergy. That said, according to the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma, and Immunology, both milk, and eggs rank among the top food allergens in children. However, eliminating these items from the diet entirely—for both children and adults—can have major nutritional impacts. It’s best to use an elimination diet to figure out the exact culprit for the intolerance before chalking it up to both dairy and eggs.

Dairy- and Egg-Free Diets

Dairy- and egg-free diets are also common in those without sensitivities. For instance, vegans typically limit their diet to foods that are not considered animal products (due to both ethical and health reasons). Instead, they enjoy a healthy vegetarian diet rich in fruit, vegetables, plant proteins, and nuts. A vegan diet is void of both animal products and their byproducts like meat, eggs, milk, and butter. This includes avoiding hidden sources of animal products, like eggs and dairy, in baked goods and packaged snacksCertain Jewish communities avoid consuming meat and dairy together, as doing so does not abide by their wishes to eat Kosher. Eggs, however, are considered

What is Dairy?

According to the U.S. Department of Agriculture, dairy refers to “all fluid milk products and foods made from milk.” This includes milk, yogurt, cheese, ice cream, and butter. Eggs are not included. They belong in the meat, poultry, fish, and eggs category, and are considered animal products.Here’s another way to think of it — the milk and cheese Americans eat come from cows, sheep, and goats, which are all mammals and have mammary glands. Eggs, on the other hand, come from chickens, which are classified as birds.