What Does a Healthy Cat Anus Look Like?

Cats seem to always have their rears in our face (see Why Does My Cat Put Her Rear In My Face?), but have you ever really thought about it? We love our cats from the tip of their nose to the tip of their tails, but we do not give much thought to cat butts until there is a problem.

Your cat has anal glands located on either side of the rectum that produce a foul smelling fluid.

What should a healthy cats bum look like?

The body profile will taper down slightly toward the tail end, while remaining well-muscled, particularly around the haunches. A slight belly pouch is normal, although it is more prominent in heavier cats, or in obese cats who have lost weight. The haunches and back legs are sturdy, poised for running or jumping.

How do I know if my cat has an inflamed anus?

Straining to defecate..Fresh blood in feces..Excessive licking of the back end..Scooting his bottom across the floor..Difficulty defecating.

Why is my cat's anus protruding?

What are Protrusion of the Rectum and Anus? Young kittens are the most at risk of developing a protruding rectum. Kittens under six months are more susceptible to parasites, which can cause straining during defecation. Older cats may also develop rectal prolapse when suffering from injuries or rectal tumors.

Should I clean my cats bum?

Warm water on a soft washcloth is the best way to clean a cat butt, Hofve advises. You can also use baby wipes or pet cleansing wipes like Earth Bath All Natural Cat Wipes, which I sometimes use. Wipes are fine if your cat can’t reach his bum by himself at all.

What do a bunch of cat veterinarians talk about when theyre hanging out at a party together? Cat poop, of course, says Dr. Jean Hofve, holistic veterinarian, author, and founder of the site Little Big Cat. Why? Because the state of a cats poop is one of the fastest ways to help determine what might be wrong with an ailing kitty. Poop is important to your cats health, so it stands to reason that the place where it exits, the cat butt, would be, too. Here are four important things you should know about caring for the cat butt.

Anal gland issues with cats are not as common as they are with dogs, but feline anal glands can clog up, causing problems. We recently took Retro in because I thought he was having problems with anal glands. He was not scooting, which is a common symptom, but he seemed to be in pain, and all clues led to 1) the litter box and 2) to his hind end.

I made a vet appointment for the next day, because when it comes to “litterbox” problems with your cat, you do not want to wait! In preparation for the vet appointment, I quarantined Retro with a clean litter box so that I could observe his activity.

The vet listened to my descriptions of Retro’s apparent physical discomfort and knowing that he seemed to be peeing OK, decided to check his anal glands. What I need to do is add fiber to his diet, because well-formed, bulky poops help to stimulate the glands, causing a small quantity of the odiferous stuff to be released with each bowel movement. I suddenly remembered that I’ve seen a lot of loose poops in the litter box: it’s no wonder he’s having this problem, and it is all my fault.

I just add enough water to make the food really pasty and easy for a cat to lick up. This is a dehydrated pumpkin digestive supplement, which I mixed with water, and added to their food. Fiber supplement products made for humans can be used, you just don’t want to get anything with a flavor (what cats eat orange?)

When these guys defecate, a bit of the stuff inside their anal glands is also pressed out, leaving a scent marker specific to that animal on their feces.

Proctitis could be caused by food allergies, internal parasites, infections, or an intestinal blockage. This condition is treatable, but because it is painful for your cat, its important to take him to a vet right away to make him more comfortable and treat the underlying cause of the condition.

When feces does pass, it may be smaller than usual and could contain fresh, red blood. Proctitis, or inflammation of the rectum and anus, can cause your cat a great deal of discomfort that is especially noticeable when he tries to defecate.

There are a number of different factors that can cause a cats rectum and anus to become inflamed. Food allergy Tumors or polyps in the rectum Inflammatory disease Colon inflammation, also known as colitis Parasites in the intestines, including tapeworms, whipworms and protozoa Presence of a foreign object If your cat lives outdoors, make sure you mention this to the vet as certain allergens could cause inflammation if ingested.

The vet will begin by performing a digital rectal examination, which will help assess the condition of the anal gland, and the quality of the stool in the intestines. If nothing turns up on these tests, the vet may perform an ultrasound or X-ray to assess the digestive system and to check for foreign objects that could be obstructing and irritating the cats rectum or anus. Treatment will need to first focus on alleviating the discomfort, and then on treating the underlying cause of the symptoms.

If the anus is inflamed, the vet may gently clean the area and apply a topical ointment to soothe the skin and reduce inflammation. If the underlying cause is a parasite or infection, the vet will prescribe medication that you must administer at home on a regular basis. Oral anti-inflammatory medication is usually prescribed even if the cause is not an inflammatory disease.

This medication can help reduce the swelling in the rectum and anus and make your cat more comfortable. In some cases, the inflammation is caused by a foreign object or tumor inside the cats body. If this is the case with your cat, it is likely that the vet will perform emergency surgery to remove the foreign object or mass.

While the underlying cause is being treated, the vet may recommend feeding your cat stool softeners or fiber supplements. Fiber supplements will firm up loose stool, resulting in less straining in those with diarrhoea. You will need to closely follow the vets instructions when it comes to administering medication to ensure your cat recovers well.

If you miss even one dose of an antibiotic treatment, for example, the bacteria could become resistant to the medication, making it less effective. If your cat has been licking the area, the vet may recommend putting an Elizabethan collar on him to stop this behavior. To combat any diarrhea, the vet will most likely ask you to change your cats diet to include more fiber and easily digestible foods.

Make sure you have this conversation with your vet prior to leaving the office, and follow his instructions closely. Monitor your cat as he heals and take him back to the vet if the symptoms are still present after treatment is over. As long as your cat receives treatment in a timely manner, rectal and anal inflammation is generally easily treatable by veterinarians.

If you suspect your cat has inflammation in the rectus and anus or is at risk, start searching for pet insurance today . Wellness lets pet parents compare insurance plans from leading companies like PetPlan and Trupanion . Paying for your pets routine shots, bloodwork and tests can also be difficult to budget for.

Wellness plans cover costs for routine care for your pet, getting your money straight back into your bank account within 24 hours. She’s generally active as a kitten would be, uses the box, and was apparently given soft foods mostly. Her stool is of a semi hard consistency and “curls”
She is very sensitive to touch near that area but overall shows no other signs of discomfort anywhere else, including the abdomen as well as there seems to be no bloating.

We also have an older cat (~12 years old, Creamsicle Tabby, neutered, chronic sinus issues, spondylitis) The most common cause for rectal irritation in kittens is parasites and stool consistency. Hello so our 6 year old female cat has started to lick her anal areas followed by diarrhea in then which she streaks across the floor.

There are many causes for diarrhea, including parasites, GI upset, intestinal infections, infectious diseases, or foreign bodies. If the diarrhea and the licking continues, then it probably would be a good idea to have her seen by a veterinarian, as they can examine her and see what‘s going on.

1. Cat butt dingleberries

If you have a longhaired cat like my Romeo, you’ve probably seen little pieces of poop clinging to a cat butt now and then. It’s especially awesome when you discover this right after your cat has jumped up on your pillow and your face is two inches from the offending clump.Dingleberries can occur if your cat’s poop is soft and is especially prevalent in cats with diarrhea. If your cat has the runs, it’s a good idea to get him checked by a vet right away.The best thing to do to keep the berries at bay is to keep that cat butt trimmed of excess fur. You can carefully do this yourself or take your cat to the vet or groomer for a “sanitary trim.”

3. Cat scooting

Well, it depends. Does your the cat butt in question need wiping? Technically, your cat should be able to handle that himself, says Hofve. However, she adds, there are circumstances when he’s going to need some assistance.Warm water on a soft washcloth is the best way to clean a cat butt, Hofve advises. You can also use baby wipes or pet cleansing wipes like Earth Bath All Natural Cat Wipes, which I sometimes use.Wipes are fine if your cat can’t reach his bum by himself at all. But if your cat can reach but simply hasn’t done such a bang-up job, just use plain water. You don’t want your cat licking himself and then ingesting chemicals, however mild, from the wipes.

The Long Term Fix

Anal gland issues with cats are not as common as they are with dogs, but feline anal glands can clog up, causing problems. We recently took Retro in because I thought he was having problems with anal glands. He was not scooting, which is a common symptom, but he seemed to be in pain, and all clues led to 1) the litter box and 2) to his hind end.I made a vet appointment for the next day, because when it comes to “litterbox” problems with your cat, you do not want to wait! Clogged anal glands can get infected, which can escalate the situation. Eventually the glands can abscess and break open, causing an open, weeping, wound that smells terrible. Plus, who wants a “weeping butt wound” in their house? In preparation for the vet appointment, I quarantined Retro with a clean litter box so that I could observe his activity. Before the visit, he urinated normally, and pooped a small amount.The vet listened to my descriptions of Retro’s apparent physical discomfort and knowing that he seemed to be peeing OK, decided to check his anal glands. My cat was taken to a back room for the examination, and I was warned that I might hear him vocalizing.She returned, holding a calm and quiet cat, and told me that she easily expressed a large quantity of material from each of his glands (cats have one on each side of the rectum). There did not seem to be an infection.

Why Do Cat Even Have Anal Glands?

A lot of carnivores have anal glands, but most of these animals live out in the wild. We are talking about animals such as wolves, large cats, civets, badgers, etc. When these guys defecate, a bit of the stuff inside their anal glands is also pressed out, leaving a scent marker specific to that animal on their feces. This helps to explain why dogs smell piles of poop: the poop has scent markers that identify who crapped it out. If our dogs had school yearbooks, these would be collections of stool samples. Cats are just another example of an animal that has this anatomy. If we had a sense of smell as good as a cat‘s, we’d probably want to smell poop, too.