What Does a French Bulldog Look Like?

If your idea of the perfect pet is a pint-sized comedian with a special gift for napping, meet the French bulldog. These charming pups love to play just as much as they love to snuggle up on their owner’s lap to take a snooze. They won’t get taller than 13 inches at the shoulder, making them a great option for city dwellers. It doesn’t take much space to keep a Frenchie happy. This breed has an easygoing personality and they make wonderful companions for families, children, or seniors. They’re easy to groom and easy to please, and they thrive on human contact.

other traits easy to groom prone to health issues apartment-friendly good for first-time pet owners strong loyalty tendencies The French bulldog‘s compact, muscular frame makes them look quite formidable, but they are generally not an aggressive breed.

They have a small, compact body that’s well proportioned and fairly muscular, with the exception of the wrinkled skin around their face and shoulders. Frenchies most often come in colors like cream, fawn, and white, but they can also have brindle patterns or black masks. Their smooth, shiny coats only require occasional brushing to stay clean, and they shed a moderate amount .

Left: The French Bulldog‘s signature bat ears weren’t always the breed standard, but now only bat-eared Frenchies are shown competitively. As free thinkers and fun lovers, they’ll be more eager to learn if training feels like a game. Frenchies do have a bit of a mischievous side, so they’ll need an owner who can laugh along with them while also sticking firm to their training plan.

Becky Smith, president of the French Bull Dog Club of America (FBDCA) notes that people with “patience, a kind disposition, gentle hands, and a loving spirit are the ideal owner for this darling breed,” who thrive on human interaction. Pied Frenchies are at least 50 percent white or cream with patches of another color on the head, neck, or body. “[If you are] the owner of a Frenchieor shall I say if you are owned by a Frenchiedon’t expect an outdoor dog that can go jogging and then go to the beach on a hot sunny day,” Smith says.

The AKC says the French bulldog‘s “front-heavy structure” is to blame for their inability to swim, and suggests never leaving one unattended near water. French bulldogs are also more prone to heat exhaustion, so a 15-minute walk or play session in the cooler evenings will give them plenty of physical activity. They’ll require a bath about once a month , giving extra attention to their hallmark wrinkles to make sure they don’t get infected .

Training a Frenchie will take a little patience and a lot of treats, but they respond well to positive reinforcement and praise for good behavior. French bulldogs have a life span of 10 to 12 years, but owners should be aware of some common health risks that the breed is known for. “This disease is caused by the excess growth of the soft palate obstructing the natural airflow, hence why these animals can be seen open-mouth breathing.”

“Another contributing factor is stenotic nares, [which means that the] nostrils are narrowed or completely closed,” Parekh says. Things came to a head at the 1897 Westminster Kennel Club Dog Show in February when rose ear Frenchies were given top scores by non-American judges.

What does a French bulldog cost?

The average cost of a French Bulldog in the U.S. is between $1,500 and $3,000. This price can fluctuate based on the reputation and location of the breeder. To ensure the best care for your puppy, be sure to find a reputable breeder. You can also consider adopting a pup from a French Bulldog rescue organization.

Are French Bulldogs good pets?

Overall, the French bulldog is a cute, affectionate dog that makes a wonderful pet for all kinds of families. Their small size means they can do well in smaller homes, but they are more sturdy than the average. This is a loyal and intelligent breed that typically gets along well with children and other animals.

What does a true French bulldog look like?

A true cream Frenchie will look slightly off white throughout – solid color. Its a recessive dilute from the fawn coat. They have no markings on them, they have black pigment, black noses, black eye rims, black paw pads, and black lips. The DNA of a true cream French Bulldog is different than the one of the light fawn.

What two dogs make a French bulldog?

French Bulldogs aren’t mixed with any breed in the modern day as they are a specific breed. However, they originate from the 1800s when bulldogs were mixed with terriers. This established French Bulldogs as a breed in their own right.

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The one-of-a-kind French Bulldog, with his large bat ears and even disposition, is one of the worlds most popular small-dog breeds, especially among city dwellers. The Frenchie is playful, alert, adaptable, and completely irresistible.

The French Bulldog has enjoyed a long history as a companion dog. Created in England to be a miniature Bulldog, they accompanied English lacemakers to France, where they acquired their Frenchie moniker.

Breed isn’t the only factor that goes into affection levels; dogs who were raised inside a home with people around feel more comfortable with humans and bond more easily. Mouthy dogs are more likely to use their mouths to hold or “herd” their human family members, and they need training to learn that it’s fine to gnaw on chew toys, but not on people.

These breeds generally aren’t a good fit for homes with smaller pets that can look like prey, such as cats, hamsters, or small dogs. Originally bred to perform a canine job of some sort, such as retrieving game for hunters or herding livestock, they have the stamina to put in a full workday. They need a significant amount of exercise and mental stimulation, and they’re more likely to spend time jumping, playing, and investigating any new sights and smells.

When picking a breed, consider your own activity level and lifestyle, and think about whether you’ll find a frisky, energetic dog invigorating or annoying. These dynamos need lots of training to learn good manners, and may not be the best fit for a home with young kids or someone who’s elderly or frail. With a nature that is both humorous and mischievous, the French Bulldog needs to live with someone who is consistent, firm, and patient with all the antics and idiosyncrasies that make him both frustrating and delightful.

Intervertebral Disc Disease can be caused by trauma, age, or simply from the physical jolt that occurs when a dog jumps off a sofa. However, it can be managed with treatments that include cauterizing or suturing injuries, transfusions of the von Willebrand factor before surgery, and avoiding certain medications. Many French Bulldogs enjoy playing and will spend much of their time in various activities, but they are not so high energy that they need a large yard or long periods of exercise.

It is important to crate train your French Bulldog puppy even if you plan to give him the freedom of the house when he reaches adulthood. It can be expensive both to repair or replace destroyed items and to pay the vet bills that could arise, so crate training benefits your wallet and your temper as well as your puppy’s well being. Begin grooming your Frenchie at a young age and teach your puppy to stand on a table or floor to make this experience easier on both of you.

If you’re uncomfortable with any aspect of grooming, such as trimming nails, take your dog to a professional groomer who understands the needs of French Bulldogs.

French Bulldog

If your idea of the perfect pet is a pint-sized comedian with a special gift for napping, meet the French bulldog. These charming pups love to play just as much as they love to snuggle up on their owner’s lap to take a snooze. They won’t get taller than 13 inches at the shoulder, making them a great option for city dwellers. It doesn’t take much space to keep a Frenchie happy. This breed has an easygoing personality and they make wonderful companions for families, children, or seniors. They’re easy to groom and easy to please, and they thrive on human contact.

Appearance

While they may not have the same handsome elegance of a golden retriever, the French bulldog is undeniably charming. They have a small, compact body that’s well proportioned and fairly muscular, with the exception of the wrinkled skin around their face and shoulders. Frenchies most often come in colors like cream, fawn, and white, but they can also have brindle patterns or black masks. They have trademark dark brown eyes and an adorable “squished up” face. Their smooth, shiny coats only require occasional brushing to stay clean, and they shed a moderate amount. A healthy full-grown French bulldog tops out at around 28 pounds, making them the miniature version of a classic bulldog (which can get up to 50 pounds). According to the AKC, “two distinctive features of the French bulldog are its bat ears and half-flat, half-domed skull.”

Temperament

French bulldogs are often described as “chilled out,” but they also love to play. They do well with companion pets, so long as they have been socialized properly. Training comes easy to this breed when there’s food involved. As free thinkers and fun lovers, they’ll be more eager to learn if training feels like a game.Frenchies do have a bit of a mischievous side, so they’ll need an owner who can laugh along with them while also sticking firm to their training plan. Becky Smith, president of the French Bull Dog Club of America (FBDCA) notes that people with “patience, a kind disposition, gentle hands, and a loving spirit are the ideal owner for this darling breed,” who thrive on human interaction. Frenchies just want to give love (and get lots of belly rubs in return!)

Living Needs

While Frenchies do enjoy playing, they’re just as happy to sit at your feet while you work or curl up on your lap to snooze. “[If you are] the owner of a Frenchie—or shall I say if you are owned by a Frenchie—don’t expect an outdoor dog that can go jogging and then go to the beach on a hot sunny day,” Smith says. “They do not do well in extreme heat because of their flat face. … They are not great swimmers due to their body weight versus length of leg.”The AKC says the French bulldog‘s “front-heavy structure” is to blame for their inability to swim, and suggests never leaving one unattended near water. French bulldogs are also more prone to heat exhaustion, so a 15-minute walk or play session in the cooler evenings will give them plenty of physical activity. They’re wonderful apartment dogs, because they don’t need a large yard or a lot of space to be happy.

Care

Weekly brushing should ensure that any Frenchie’s coat stays handsome and healthy. They’ll require a bath about once a month, giving extra attention to their hallmark wrinkles to make sure they don’t get infected. Owners also need to regularly check their bulldog‘s skin for lesions or scabs and see a vet right away should anything seem out of the ordinary.Like many breeds, a French bulldog needs to learn how to socialize from a young age. They can be very protective and possessive of their humans. So long as they are socialized as puppies, Frenchies get along great with new faces and other dogs or cats.If a little drool on the furniture bothers you, a Frenchie might not be the breed for you. They can also be difficult to potty train. They are intelligent, yet free spirited, so they may dig in their heels when it comes to appeasing commands. Training a Frenchie will take a little patience and a lot of treats, but they respond well to positive reinforcement and praise for good behavior. Just stick with it and your little guy will come around.

Health

French bulldogs have a life span of 10 to 12 years, but owners should be aware of some common health risks that the breed is known for. “The vast majority [of Frenchies] suffer from a disease called Brachycephalic Obstructive Airway Disease,” Kishen Parekh, DVM, of Northampton, United Kingdom, says. “This disease is caused by the excess growth of the soft palate obstructing the natural airflow, hence why these animals can be seen open-mouth breathing.” Because of this condition, French bulldogs have a higher tendency to snort and snuffle. Frequent panting, difficulty eating, coughing, or snoring can all be warning signs of something more serious.”Another contributing factor is stenotic nares, [which means that the] nostrils are narrowed or completely closed,” Parekh says. “This causes these breeds to snore when asleep, [and] it also may appear that they are struggling to breathe. Upon exercising, they can develop hyperthermia [heat stroke] due to the inability to breathe adequately.” Owners must be diligent in keeping their Frenchie hydrated and limiting time in the heat. French bulldogs can also be prone to eye conditions, like cherry eye, or skin allergies passed down from their parents. A responsible breeder will test for these conditions.

History

Contrary to their name, the French bulldog‘s story doesn’t begin in France—it originates in England. In Nottingham, lace makers kept toy-size bulldogs to chase away rats in their small working quarters. During the height of the Industrial Revolution in the 1800s, lace workers were replaced by machines, so many were forced to relocate to France, where lace was still made by hand. The French fell in love with the smaller bulldog that came along with the workers, and after decades of crossbreeding, the breed developed their iconic bat ears and the French bulldog was born. Parisians took a great liking to the breed, and soon every artist, actor, and celebrity in the city wanted one. Americans visiting overseas loved the miniature version of the bulldog, and it wasn’t long before Frenchies took off in the U.S. as well.In the early days of the breed, there were two types of ears on Frenchies: the bat style popular with Americans and the rose ear commonly seen on their kin the bulldog. This ear difference was the source of great controversy amongst breed aficionados. Americans insisted that true Frenchies had to have the bat ears we know the breed for today; British and French breed lovers disagreed. Things came to a head at the 1897 Westminster Kennel Club Dog Show in February when rose ear Frenchies were given top scores by non-American judges. A group of prominent French bulldog fans founded the French Bulldog Club of America in April 1897 to establish and document the breed standard and demanded the bat ear become the breed standard. They eventually won.

Tips

There are several dog breeds that have similar appearances to French bulldogs. However, if you know how to spot the differences, it may be easier to tell whether a dog is a French bulldog.

French Bulldog

The French Bulldog has enjoyed a long history as a companion dog. Created in England to be a miniature Bulldog, they accompanied English lacemakers to France, where they acquired their “Frenchie” moniker.Although this is a purebred dog breed, you may find them in shelters and rescues. Opt toBesides being companions, they once served as excellent ratters, but today their job focuses on being fabulous family friends and show dogs. Even apartment dwellers and first-time pet parents will love this affectionate breed.It’s important to remember that dogs of any breed can suffer from health issues throughout their lives. A good pet insurance plan can help you prepare to give your dog the care they need at any age.See below for complete list of dog breed traits and facts about French Bulldogs!