What Do Skinks Eat?

Skinks are pretty common animals. You have likely already seen one in your backyard since these lizards love to spend their days basking in the warm sun. These lizards are part of the Scincidae family and are not part of the true lizard family because they usually have smaller limbs while some have no limbs at all.

They are commonly seen around human dwellings because these clever reptiles know that lots of food items will be attracted by your home lights at night. Skinks can eat a huge variety of insect types including flies, cockroaches, crickets, grasshoppers, beetles, caterpillars, earthworms, millipedes, centipedes, snails, slugs, mosquitos, and many others.

Gravid skinks can also become cannibalistic if they are in a bad situation where other foods might be scarce in which case they might eat their young or their own species. Small rodents like mice can be a very filling treat for bigger skink species but this isnt one of the most common foods for these animals. In the wild, skinks mostly feed on insects like earthworms, crickets, butterflies, flies, grasshoppers, and caterpillars.

Most pet owners prefer to keep omnivore skink species because these tend to be a little bit easier to feed. Insectivore skinks are usually fed on a variety of insect types that are sold in pet stores. Dip insects in a bit of bone meal before offering these to your skink so your animal can stay healthy and happy.

But if your skink eats a large portion today, then you can go ahead and skip a day before offering it food again.

What human food can skinks eat?

Canned, premium wet dog or cat food..Moistened, premium dry dog or cat food..Canned insects and canned snails..Mealworms and superworms..Hard-boiled eggs..Boiled chicken..Cooked ground turkey or lean beef..Pinkie mice, live or thawed from frozen, rarely.

Can I keep a skink as a pet?

Skinks are medium-sized reptiles many enjoy keeping as pets. A skink can be an excellent pet with proper care. Make sure your skink has a comfortable tank with plenty of space to roam and hide. Provide a diet rich in the nutrients a skink needs to thrive.

Can a skink eat fruit?

As for specific foods, blue tongue skinks are omnivores; they can eat fruits, vegetables, and a few different forms of protein. However, you’re going to want to prioritize protein and veggies over fruit, since they offer more nutritional benefits.

Do skinks bite humans?

They have small sharp teeth which easily slice through smaller prey. Even wild individuals are very docile, and rarely bite humans when touched or picked up.

The common garden skink or pale-flecked garden sunskink (Lampropholis guichenoti), also known as a penny lizard, is a species of small common skink endemic to Australia.

The garden skink usually has a browny black colour and sometimes may appear a dark shade of red when bathing in the sun. They have small sharp teeth which easily slice through smaller prey.

Even wild individuals are very docile, and rarely bite humans when touched or picked up. Garden skinks feed on larger invertebrates, including crickets, moths, slaters, earthworms, flies, grubs and caterpillars, grasshoppers, cockroaches, earwigs, slugs, dandelions, small spiders, ladybeetles and many other small insects, which makes them a very helpful animal around the garden. Garden skinks rely purely on the movement of their prey when hunting.

When hunting, the skinks will either hide and wait for prey to come by or actively pursue it (this depends on how hungry they are). Once they have had one meal, they begin to actively pursue prey for a short while with their newfound energy. Garden skinks only need one prey item per 4 or 5 days, thus making it an ideal pet for small children.

Skinks are often seen under leaves, in long grass and under rocks so that they can watch their prey, they often prefer hiding in logs where their larger predators cannot reach them. Skinks enjoy large areas with a lot of leaves and soft soil. They are normally found around hot and dusty areas that have many trees and stumps.

Blue Tailed Skinks are impressive lizards that love to chow down on a wide array of foods. If you have one of these beautiful lizards at home, what should you be feeding them, and how does that compare to what they eat in the wild?

If a wild Blue Tailed Skink comes across a smaller lizard, theres a good chance that theyll try to eat it. The Blue Tailed Skink usually wins the battle, but they often get injured in the process, and over time, those injuries can kill them.

Its no wonder that a wild Blue Tailed Skink prefers to stick with smaller prey, like insects and arachnids, when possible. While its not overly common to see a Blue Tailed Skink eating a small rodent in the wild, its mostly because they dont come across them that often. Image Credit: PiqselsA Blue Tailed Skinks diet in captivity is a bit different.

Unlike wild Blue Tailed Skinks, we recommend feeding adults up to 70% fruits and veggies. Blue Tailed Skinks in captivity dont get as much exercise as wild ones and they get consistent feedings, both of which make them more prone to obesity. However, if you have a baby or adolescent Blue Tailed Skink, keep them on a protein-strong diet of primarily insects until theyre fully grown.

When your Blue Tailed Skink is an adolescent, feed them a diet of about 70% small insects, a majority of which can be silkworms. Adult Blue Tailed Skinks are more than large enough to take down a cricket, but adolescents and babies arent up to the task yet. It doesnt matter which type of worm you feed to your Blue Tailed Skink; theyll happily gobble it up.

Oliver (Ollie) Jones A zoologist and freelance writer living in South Australia with his partner Alex, their dog Pepper, and their cat Steve (who declined to be pictured). Ollie, originally from the USA, holds his masters degree in wildlife biology and moved to Australia to pursue his career and passion but has found a new love for working online and writing about animals of all types.

There are over 320 species of skinks in Australia. They can range in size from the small common Garden Skink at just 9cm to the large Blue-Tongued Lizard that can get over 40cm long. Most suburban backyards are home to a variety of skinks, but many look similar at a glance.

This is a survival tactic, as predators often focus on the wriggling tail while the skink escapes. The tail will eventually regrow, but it costs the skink a lot of energy.

Due to their timid nature and quick reflexes you may only ever see them dashing for cover as you approach. You will most often see them sunning themselves on rocks or bricks, but as they are prey for many birds, they will disappear like lightning if they sense any threats. A place to hide lizards have a good chance of escaping predators if your garden includes logs , small bundles of sticks and dense ground cover.

accumulate plenty of leaf mulch on garden beds this provides the ideal location for skinks to hide and feed. lean a small stick in any water bowl skinks may drink there and be unable to climb out. This is a survival tactic, as predators often focus on the wriggling tail while the skink escapes.

Description[edit]

The female pale-flecked garden sunskink has a yellowish, almost orange tinge to her underside, however the males have a light grey tinge to their underside. Females are often bigger than the males in size.

Diet[edit]

Garden skinks feed on larger invertebrates, including crickets, moths, slaters, earthworms, flies, grubs and caterpillars, grasshoppers, cockroaches, earwigs, slugs, dandelions, small spiders, ladybeetles and many other small insects, which makes them a very helpful animal around the garden. They can also feed on fruit and vegetables, but the vegetables have to be cooked for the skink to be able to eat it. Skinks especially love bananas and strawberries etc. (no citrus fruit). Garden skinks rely purely on the movement of their prey when hunting. When hunting, the skinks will either hide and wait for prey to come by or actively pursue it (this depends on how hungry they are). Once they have caught their prey, they shake it around vigorously to kill it before swallowing it whole. Once they have had one meal, they begin to actively pursue prey for a short while with their newfound energy. Garden skinks only need one prey item per 4 or 5 days, thus making it an ideal pet for small children. They can eat worms if you drain the soil out of them with salt water because worms are too high in soil for them.

Habitat[edit]

Skinks are often seen under leaves, in long grass and under rocks so that they can watch their prey, they often prefer hiding in logs where their larger predators cannot reach them. As with most reptiles, the Common garden skink is cold blooded, and may be seen on top of rocks or paths in the morning trying to warm their blood. Skinks enjoy large areas with a lot of leaves and soft soil. They are normally found around hot and dusty areas that have many trees and stumps.

Predators[edit]

The garden skink’s predators are mainly birds and cats. Even tiny birds like robins are a threat to skinks. Larger lizards and snakes will sometimes try to eat them as well. Like many other skinks, its tail will drop if grasped roughly. The disconnected tail will twitch vigorously for a while, capturing the attention of the predator while the lizard makes its escape. This survival tactic may seem hard for the skink to tolerate, but it is quite the opposite. Although it may cost the skink some energy, the skink’s tail will eventually grow back to normal.

Insects

Almost all of what a wild Blue Tailed Skinks diet consists of is insects. They’re not picky about them either — ants, flies, grasshoppers, crickets, and whatever other insect they can find is what they’ll eat. They also have decent success with mealworms and other small insects that can’t run away that fast.

Arachnids

Did you know that spiders technically aren’t insects? Technically, they’re arachnids, but the Blue Tailed Skink doesn’t seem to mind much when they gobble them down.

Lizards

If a wild Blue Tailed Skink comes across a smaller lizard, there’s a good chance that they’ll try to eat it. But this is one food that a wild Blue Tailed Skink eats that you should never feed to your pet Skink. The Blue Tailed Skink usually wins the battle, but they often get injured in the process, and over time, those injuries can kill them.It’s no wonder that a wild Blue Tailed Skink prefers to stick with smaller prey, like insects and arachnids, when possible.

Veggies and Fruits

While wild Blue Tailed Skinks thrive on insects, they can do reasonably well on a heavily plant-based diet too. So, if they’re not catching enough insects in the wild and different fruits and veggies are available, they’ll undoubtedly chow down.

Rodents

While it’s not overly common to see a Blue Tailed Skink eating a small rodent in the wild, it’s mostly because they don’t come across them that often. They don’t go after nesting grounds because there are too many rodents there, but a Blue Tailed Skink can take down a rodent one-on-one in the wild.

Fruits and Veggies

Unlike wild Blue Tailed Skinks, we recommend feeding adults up to 70% fruits and veggies. Blue Tailed Skinks in captivity don’t get as much exercise as wild ones and they get consistent feedings, both of which make them more prone to obesity.Feed your adult Blue Tailed Skink kale, collard greens, red-tipped apple slices, figs, berries, and the occasional apple slices to keep them happy and healthy. However, if you have a baby or adolescent Blue Tailed Skink, keep them on a protein-strong diet of primarily insects until they’re fully grown.

Silkworms

Silkworms are easy for your Blue Tailed Skink to track down and eat, and they’re full of protein, which helps your Skink grow. When your Blue Tailed Skink is an adolescent, feed them a diet of about 70% small insects, a majority of which can be silkworms.

Crickets

Frozen or thawed crickets are excellent options for your Blue Tailed Skink, but ensure that your Skink is large enough before feeding them a cricket. Adult Blue Tailed Skinks are more than large enough to take down a cricket, but adolescents and babies aren’t up to the task yet.

Worms

It doesn’t matter which type of worm you feed to your Blue Tailed Skink; they’ll happily gobble it up. Add variety by adding different kinds of worms to keep your Skink as happy as possible. Just ensure that you don’t overfeed your Skink by giving them worms that are too big.

Centipedes

Another small insect that both baby and adult Blue Tailed Skinks like is the centipede. These insects can come in various sizes, but your Skink will break them down into bite-sized portions at meals. Once again, don’t overdo it, though.

Grasshoppers

Just like crickets, your Blue Tailed Skink will love a frozen or thawed grasshopper. Also, you should only feed grasshoppers to an adult Blue Tailed Skink. Otherwise, it’s simply too much food for a baby or adolescent in one go, and it’s harder for them to break it down into smaller chunks.

Spiders

If you have a smaller spider, there’s no reason that you can’t give it to your Blue Tailed Skink for disposal. Just ensure that they’re not venomous and won’t hurt your Blue Tailed Skink. Also, ensure that they’re not too large, especially if your Skink is still a baby or an adolescent.

Beetles

Beetles make up over 350,000 known species, and your Blue Tailed Skink will happily gobble down any of them. Just ensure that the beetle you’re feeding your Skink isn’t too large and can’t fight back.

Ants

Ants are the perfect food for a baby Blue Tailed Skink. They are extremely small, which makes them easy to eat and digest. Just be sure not to drop a ton of ants in the enclosure at once. If you do, the ants might escape, and you’ll likely have ants running all around your home.

Mealworms

Great tiny insects for both adult and baby Blue Tailed Skinks are mealworms. These have tons of protein, which is essential to your Skink’s growth and development. Not only that, but Blue Tailed Skinks also love gobbling down these little worms!

Mineral Supplement

In the wild, a Blue Tailed Skink gets a wide variety of foods to meet all their dietary needs. This is much harder to emulate in captivity. That’s why we recommend adding a mineral supplement to their meal to ensure that they get everything that they need to stay happy and healthy.