This is a question that more than 7463 of our readers have been asking us! Luckily, we have found the most appropriate information for you!

The Green Iguana (Iguana Iguana), also known as the American Iguana, is native to South America, a large arboreal reptile they are what springs to people’s minds when they often see or hear about a reptile as a pet. Strangely enough, they are not nearly the most popular reptile in the pet industry, but there are a lot of Iguana owners, nonetheless. The Green Iguana is a herbivorous reptile, eating fruits and vegetables solely in their captive diet. Although Iguanas have been observed consuming invertebrates in their natural habitat, there is some debate over whether they should be offered animal protein in captivity. It’s not something they require, and it seems to be more of an opportunistic thing for them in the wild. There are also several commercial products available that have been formulated from fruits and vegetables to provide a sustainable diet for them, which can be used as their whole diet or to supplement their diet alongside fresh foods.

In captivity, some certain fruits and vegetables are better than others that are more healthy than others, and you must provide them with the correct ratio of the various nutrients that they require to stay healthy. Iguanas that are held in captivity are fed fruit, flowers, leafy greens, turnip greens, and shoots of plants, each of which contains varying amounts of vitamins, minerals, and nutrients. All Iguanas should be offered food daily, regardless of age, which is in contrast to most other reptiles, which require different schedules depending on age. Older Iguanas may not be as hungry, and it is okay to skip a day here and there, but with baby and juvenile Iguanas, they must be fed daily. Foods should be chopped into sizes appropriate for the size Iguana and offered after the foods have been treated with the proper supplementation. Oxalates bind calcium in the body, and they should be restricted in the diet of any species that requires a lot of calcium in their diet, such as the Green Iguana. Calcium is used to maintain a healthy bone structure. Without it, Iguanas can become susceptible to conditions like metabolic bone disease and other health issues related to a lack of calcium absorption. Foods that are high in phosphorous should also be avoided, and phosphorous has a similar effect to oxalates in the body as in that they also inhibit calcium absorption so can cause the same issues. Goitrogenic foods also need to be limited in the Iguana’s diet; goitrogens bind iodine which will inhibit iodine absorption in the body of the Iguana. Iodine is essential because it is used by the thyroid glands, which regulates the vital organs in the body. Lack of iodine absorption will lead to a malfunctioning thyroid gland and severe health complications. Vegetables make up the majority of your pet Iguana’s diet, low in fat and sugar and high in vitamins and minerals they are the best foodstuffs for your pet aside from the commercially prepared diet products available. The following is a list of the best vegetables to feed your Iguana. Alfalfa (Fresh) Arugula Butternut Squash Chicory Collard Greens Dandelion Greens/Flowers Endive Escarole Hibiscus flowers and leaves Mustard Greens Nasturtiums Prickly Pear Cactus Pads and Fruits Spaghetti Squash Thyme Turnip Greens Artichoke Hearts Asparagus Bell Peppers Chayote Green Beans Kale Red Cabbage Parsnips Peas Pumpkin Vegetables should make up the majority of every feeding your Iguana is offered. Here is a list of fruits that can be offered to your Iguana. Apples Cantaloupe Mango Papaya Blackberries Blueberries Cherries Cranberries Guava Pears Peaches Plums Raspberries Strawberries Chamomile Chrysanthemum Petals Dandelions Hibiscus Hollyhock Lavender Marigold Nasturtium Rose Petals There are several products available commercially that have been formulated to provide nutrition to your Iguana, these are best used in conjunction with a diet of fresh fruits and vegetables, and they are not bad for your Iguana. You should stick to the products made specifically for reptiles and not rodent pellets that some people may recommend you use. These have been made with vegetables and fruits that are safe for your Iguana to eat. These pellets can also be soaked in water to make them expand and provide a source of hydration and can also be used to administer medications to your Iguana should you be in a position where that is necessary. Calcium powder – 3 days per week Multivitamin powder – 1 day per week Only supplement every other day, never consecutive days, and only use a small pinch of supplement powder each feeding. Green Iguanas need a constant water source made available for them. Younger Iguanas may have issues finding their water, though, so you should offer them water using a spray bottle daily to ensure that they stay well hydrated. Providing them with a water dish, you should use one that is big enough for them to bathe in so it can fit their entire body. It may be useful for you to physically place them inside their water dish if they don’t seem to get into it themselves to show them how to find it. Iguanas are great swimmers and will enjoy going in the water.

What are iguanas favorite food?

Iguanas are herbivores, specifically folivores (leaf eaters), so the absolute best food for iguanas is dark green leafy vegetables. They also enjoy other non-leafy vegetables, fruits, flowers, and commercial iguana food.

What all can I feed my iguana?

70% dark leafy greens such as collard greens and spinach; 20% bulk vegetables such as cabbage, carrots and broccoli; 10% fruit such as mangoes, bananas and strawberries..Iguanas benefit from being fed a commercial iguana diet.

Do iguanas eat meat?

Iguanas should not eat meat or bugs. You should stick with plants, leaves, flowers and fruits. Other foods can be bad for Iguanas if they’re fed too much of them. … There are different varieties of lettuce you can feed your Iguana.

Do iguanas eat insects?

While adult iguanas prefer feeding on foliage, flowers and fruit, they will occasionally eat animal material such as insects, lizards and other small animals, nestling birds and eggs.

If you are thinking about getting an iguana as a pet in your home, you are likely trying to find out everything you can about it. One of the most common questions is what your iguana will eat. The short answer is that iguanas are herbivores and will primarily eat plants. However, its diet can be quite varied so keep reading if you would like to learn more about what plants are best to feed your pet and what it would eat in the wild.

Image Credit: Ulrike Mai, PixabayAs we mentioned earlier, wild iguanas will primarily eat plants that they can find easily. Image Credit: PiqselsSince your iguana is a strict herbivore, you should limit the animal protein intake to less than 5% of its diet. Most dog and cat foods will be too high in protein and can cause digestive problems though it might enjoy a few crickets, mealworms, and even pinky mice on occasion. Your iguana will need constant access to fresh, clean water, not only to drink but to bathe in to stay cool. Image Credit: PixabayMetabolic Bone Disease (MBD) is common to many captive reptiles and results from an insufficient calcium supply in the diet. The lack of calcium causes the bones to become soft and brittle and, in the advanced stages, may render your iguana immobile. You need to watch this ratio because phosphorus binds with calcium and prevents it from getting absorbed by your pet, leading to MBD. Image Credit: PixabaySince your iguana is prone to MBD, most experts recommend dusting the food with a reptile grade calcium supplement that does not contain Vitamin D3 every few days to help keep your pet healthy. You can add variety by adding in other vegetables, like carrots, kale parsley, and broccoli, along with a small number of fruits, like peaches or blueberries. If we have helped you provide a healthy diet for your pet, please share this guide to feeding your iguana on Facebook and Twitter. Ed Malaker is a veteran writer who has contributed to a wide range of blogs that cover tools, pets, guitars, fitness, and computer programming. He’s also a musician and spends a lot of time helping people fix their guitars and composing music for independent films.

Get a quote to insure your Iguana for £1,000 of vet fees. Up to 3 pets per policy | We’ve been insuring exotic pets since 1996 | Check out our Customer reviews on Feefo.

Even if you don’t have a garden you can buy the ProRep tortoise growing kits. Pansy Hibiscus Rose Nasturtium Dahlia Viola Lilac Fuchsia Marigold Snapdragon Apple blossom Lavender Chrysanthemum Optunia I wouldn’t choose shop purchased flowers; they have generally been treated to enhance growth and colour and some have even had pesticides used on them. You can also purchase shop or supermarket greens, salad, herbs and fruit like: Spring Greens Florette mix Lambs lettuce Water-cress Pak choi Basil Mint Oregano Rosemary Sage Berries Mango Papaya Mellon Fig Wild rocket Pumpkin Parsnip Sweet potato Carrot Bell Pepper Marrow Cucumber Spinach (not too much of the Spinach, as can stop the absorption of calcium. But to cover as many bases as we can, it’s always best to provide a wide variety on a nutritional scale. Although they’ve been seen to eat a few insect species in wild conditions and under certain circumstances – this is not something they have evolved to need. They struggle to process the meat and proteins, putting a huge strain on their liver and kidneys – which ultimately can be fatal. An example would be two popular greens found on the food list of most reptile keepers. Spinach has a high oxalate content and too much of this can bind the calcium absorption of the Iguana (as with all reptiles). This can cause issues that lead to MBD (metabolic bone disease) In moderation both kale and spinach are hugely beneficial as part of a varied diet. Some such as Iceberg lettuce have low nutritional value but others such as Romaine, Lambs and Gem are better and all offer great hydration options, but again variety is the key here. You should feed in the morning, thus allowing for a full day of ample heat and UVB (Ultraviolet light) for digestion and basking. Most reptiles carry a small load of internal parasites which are mostly of no issue to them. It’s only when illness, or during times of stress that these parasite numbers can gain more of a foothold internally, causing issues and symptoms such as going off food. These areas should be nice and clear and clean Digits – Count those toes. Five on each limb and no claws/nails missing Spikes – Check the row of spikes/spines that run from the head to tail. There shouldn’t be any missing or have stuck shed around them Limbs and tail – These should have no abnormal bends, bowing, or kinks in them. A healthy, well looked after Iguana can live up to 20 years and more but taking care of one requires time, dedication and experience. They also need space, the right setup parameters and a good diet to survive and thrive in captivity. Keeping an Iguana is a lifelong commitment and there will naturally be illness and health issues to deal with along the way. Having some experience of reptile behaviour is something I’d consider vital for such a species, particularly for one that can commonly be very territorial. They require a huge living space, with the Green Iguana growing up to 6ft in length once fully grown. It’s all about usable surface area and bigger is always going to be better with this large tropical species. Owning an Iguana means providing them with the very best quality in terms of diet and living arrangements, it is not appropriate to cut corners when it comes to their well-being. Of course, with care, interaction and the correct feeding, you’ll earn the trust of your reptile and have a happy and healthy companion for many years. This app allows you to take a photo of the weed, flower or plant in question. You can then identify weeds and flowers etc, and deem if safe, without all the guess work. Pete Hawkins may receive commission for pet insurance sales that result from you clicking on a link within this article. The common green Iguana like all its sub-species cousins are pretty much strictly herbivores, folivores and frugivores. This means they eat mainly leaves, weeds, flowers and fruits. They have no choice with what’s on offer, so it’s down to us to make things as nutritionally beneficial and worthwhile for them as humanly possible. A few decades of captive breeding can never undo millions of years of evolutionary needs and requirements when it comes to an Iguanas diet and setup. Dandelion Alfalfa Plantain Ribwort Bittercress Clover Mallow Hedge-mustard

Iguanas are primarily herbivores, frugivores, and folivores, meaning they primarily live on a diet of plants. However, with over 30 different types of iguanas in the wild (all living in various climates and regions), their diets vary depending on the species.

However, with over 30
different types of iguanas in the wild (all living in various climates and
regions), their diets vary depending on the species. Iguanas are native to a large geographic area, including Mexico, the Caribbean islands, southern Brazil, and Paraguay. Although not native to the U.S., there is now an extensive population of feral iguanas living in the wild in southern Florida, the U.S. Virgin Islands, Peurto Rico, Hawaii, and parts of Texas. Iguanas, one of the largest lizards in the Americas, are extremely adaptive creatures and are found in numerous environments, including deserts, tropical forests, and even in the water. Green iguanas in the wild are primarily herbivores, meaning their diet consists almost entirely of plants like leaves, fruits, and flowers. On rare occasions, green iguanas in the wild have been known to
eat eggs, leaf dwelling insects, and snails. However, they are also found living in rocky streambeds as well as areas of tropical deciduous forests and subtropical scrub. Desert iguanas possess the unique ability to withstand high temperatures, often staying out in the heat long after other lizards have retreated. These lizards are stocky, with thick tails, wide bodies, prominent bellies, and flat midsections. Found exclusively on the Galapagos islands, marine iguanas are the only lizards who spend time in the ocean. These remarkable iguanas have adapted to a lifestyle on the island, which includes swimming along rocky shores (they can dive up to 65′ feet underwater), the ability to ingest saltwater and then remove the salt by “sneezing” it out from special “salt glands,” and the unique capability to shrink in size during times of food shortages (especially during weather events like El Nino). Spiny-tailed iguanas, native to Central America, are commonly found in Costa Rica, Colombia, Honduras, and in feral populations in South Florida. They prefer to live in a rocky habitat with nearby trees for climbing and plenty of rocks and crevices to hide in. However, they are opportunistic eaters, meaning when available and necessary, they will consume eggs, small animals and rodents, fish, birds, and arthropods. So to answer our original question, “what do iguanas eat in the wild?” we have discovered they mainly subsist on plants, including flowers, fruits, and leaves. However, as highly adaptive creatures living in a wide range of climates and regions, iguanas also consume small animals, eggs, and insects when necessary.

What Do I Feed My Green Iguana?

The Green Iguana (Iguana Iguana), also known as the American Iguana, is native to South America, a large arboreal reptile they are what springs to people’s minds when they often see or hear about a reptile as a pet. Strangely enough, they are not nearly the most popular reptile in the pet industry, but there are a lot of Iguana owners, nonetheless. The Green Iguana is a herbivorous reptile, eating fruits and vegetables solely in their captive diet. Although Iguanas have been observed consuming invertebrates in their natural habitat, there is some debate over whether they should be offered animal protein in captivity. It’s not something they require, and it seems to be more of an opportunistic thing for them in the wild. There are also several commercial products available that have been formulated from fruits and vegetables to provide a sustainable diet for them, which can be used as their whole diet or to supplement their diet alongside fresh foods.In captivity, some certain fruits and vegetables are better than others that are more healthy than others, and you must provide them with the correct ratio of the various nutrients that they require to stay healthy. Iguanas that are held in captivity are fed fruit, flowers, leafy greens, turnip greens, and shoots of plants, each of which contains varying amounts of vitamins, minerals, and nutrients. So what should you feed your pet Iguana?

Goitrogenic Foods and Oxalic Foods

All Iguanas should be offered food daily, regardless of age, which is in contrast to most other reptiles, which require different schedules depending on age. Older Iguanas may not be as hungry, and it is okay to skip a day here and there, but with baby and juvenile Iguanas, they must be fed daily. Foods should be chopped into sizes appropriate for the size Iguana and offered after the foods have been treated with the proper supplementation.

Green Iguana Water

Vegetables make up the majority of your pet Iguana’s diet, low in fat and sugar and high in vitamins and minerals they are the best foodstuffs for your pet aside from the commercially prepared diet products available. The following is a list of the best vegetables to feed your Iguana.

What Do Iguanas Eat in The Wild?

Wild iguanas are opportunistic herbivores, and the type of food it eats will primarily depend on what type of iguana it is and what plants are available nearby, only in rare cases will an iguana eat eggs or insects.Green iguanas are arboreal, which means they spend most of their lives high in a tree, so they will usually eat leaves, seeds, and fruit that the tree produces.Desert iguanas will eat fruit and buds from any plants they can find in the hot environment, and marine iguanas spend most of their time in water and usually eat algae and any plants it finds growing near the shore.Other iguanas will do the same and eat plant matter it can easily find. However, it’s not unusual for the iguana to have a favorite food that it eats. For instance, Green Iguanas in Panama prefer to eat the common wild plum, and the Desert Iguana prefers to eat the yellow flowers from the creosote bush.

What Do Pet Iguanas Eat?

As we mentioned earlier, wild iguanas will primarily eat plants that they can find easily. Its diet consists of mostly leaves, but it will also eat buds, fruit, and seeds. Your captive iguana will need to eat a similar diet.Most experts suggest that vegetables should make up 80% to 90% of your pet’s diet. Dark leafy foods like collard greens, clover, watercress, celery greens, dandelion greens, parsley, cilantro, and Chinese cabbage all make great choices and will help keep your pet healthy.When choosing something to mix with the dark greens to provide variety, most experts recommend choosing a vegetable high in calcium. Suitable choices include beet greens, mustard greens, kale, parsley, romaine lettuce, asparagus, cucumbers, mushrooms, carrots, broccoli, and more.You can also add a small number of yellow vegetables to add variety to your pet’s diet. These choices include yellow squash, zucchini squash, butternut squash, bell peppers, and green beans.You want to avoid vegetables that aren’t high in nutrients and are mostly water. Vegetables with little nutritional value include iceberg lettuce and celery.Experts say that fruit can make up 10% to 20% of your pet’s diet to help add variety to its diet. Good fruits include apples, peaches, tomatoes, kiwis, apricots, blueberries, and more.

Can an Iguana Eat Animal Protein?

Since your iguana is a strict herbivore, you should limit the animal protein intake to less than 5% of its diet. Most dog and cat foods will be too high in protein and can cause digestive problems though it might enjoy a few crickets, mealworms, and even pinky mice on occasion. However, this food should be limited and rarely provided.

Does My Iguana Need Water?

Yes. Your iguana will need constant access to fresh, clean water, not only to drink but to bathe in to stay cool. Iguanas can absorb water through the skin, so a heavy bowl of water that won’t spill and frequent spraying with a water bottle is required.

What does a healthy and unhealthy Iguana look like?

Firstly, I’d suggest planting some flower and weed seeds such as:
Even if you don’t have a garden you can buy the ProRep tortoise growing kits. And you have yourself a window box that will grow the above inside the house without issue (see my own attached photo of one of my own ProRep boxes)As for flowers. The same really. Search Amazon and eBay and plant your own. Go for the likes of:I wouldn’t choose shop purchased flowers; they have generally been treated to enhance growth and colour and some have even had pesticides used on them.Of course, you can safely forage you own weeds too; this is one of my favourite things to do ever! (yes, I’m sad like that). You can collect them from grounds away from roads. You should aim for:You can also purchase shop or supermarket greens, salad, herbs and fruit like:All Squash varieties:No acidic fruits should be fed however.As you can see, what is fed is down to you the keeper. But to cover as many bases as we can, it’s always best to provide a wide variety on a nutritional scale. There’s really no excuse for not doing so.Get a quote to insure your Iguana for £1,000 of vet fees. Up to 3 pets per policy | We’ve been insuring exotic pets since 1996 | Check out our Customer reviews on Feefo.

Taking long-term care of your Iguana

If you’re planning on buying an Iguana as a pet, you will be getting a beautiful and intelligent reptile. A healthy, well looked after Iguana can live up to 20 years and more but taking care of one requires time, dedication and experience.They also need space, the right setup parameters and a good diet to survive and thrive in captivity.Keeping an Iguana is a lifelong commitment and there will naturally be illness and health issues to deal with along the way. There will hopefully be many good times but a few bad times I’m sure.Personally, I don’t think an Iguana is a “beginner” reptile at all. Having some experience of reptile behaviour is something I’d consider vital for such a species, particularly for one that can commonly be very territorial.The reading of a reptile’s (and specifically Iguanas) body language is an absolute must.You also need to consider the living arrangements of your Iguana. They require a huge living space, with the Green Iguana growing up to 6ft in length once fully grown.You are going to need at least a 6ft x 6ft x 2ft set-up. Despite what some breeders or pet shops say. It’s all about usable surface area and bigger is always going to be better with this large tropical species.Owners also need to ensure their Iguanas have the required UVB (ultraviolet light) and temperature needed to remain healthy.If you can’t provide the best of what is needed then a reptile is not for you. Owning an Iguana means providing them with the very best quality in terms of diet and living arrangements, it is not appropriate to cut corners when it comes to their well-being.Of course, with care, interaction and the correct feeding, you’ll earn the trust of your reptile and have a happy and healthy companion for many years.

A Brief Introduction to Iguanas

Iguanas are native to a large geographic area, including Mexico, the Caribbean islands, southern Brazil, and Paraguay.Although not native to the U.S., there is now an extensive population of feral iguanas living in the wild in southern Florida, the U.S. Virgin Islands, Peurto Rico, Hawaii, and parts of Texas.Iguanas, one of the largest lizards in the Americas, are extremely adaptive creatures and are found in numerous environments, including deserts, tropical forests, and even in the water.We will now examine the five most common types of iguanas, uncovering their habitats and discovering what they eat in the wild.

Green Iguanas

Green iguanas (also known as American iguanas) are by far the most common iguana found in the Americas.They are large creatures, sometimes growing as long as 6′ feet in length and weighing up to 20 pounds.Green iguanas are arboreal, meaning they live up in the canopy of trees for most of their lives, only coming down occasionally to change trees, mate, or lay eggs.This means much of their food is found and consumed up in the trees.

What do Green Iguanas Eat in the Wild?

Green iguanas in the wild are primarily herbivores, meaning their diet consists almost entirely of plants like leaves, fruits, and flowers.Since they are found in numerous regions across the Americas, plant availability in their specific location and habitat determines the types of plants they eat.For example, in Panama, the wild plum is one of the green iguana’s favorite foods.On rare occasions, green iguanas in the wild have been known to eat eggs, leaf dwelling insects, and snails.

Desert Iguanas

One of the most common lizards found in the Mojave and Sonoran deserts (northwestern Mexico and the southwestern United States) is the desert iguana.Pale cream or gray-tan, they are medium-sized lizards growing to be about 24″ inches in length (snout to tail).Their habitat is primarily in sandy, dry, desert scrubland regions, usually within the territory of the creosote bush.However, they are also found living in rocky streambeds as well as areas of tropical deciduous forests and subtropical scrub.Desert iguanas possess the unique ability to withstand high temperatures, often staying out in the heat long after other lizards have retreated.

What do Desert Iguanas Eat in the Wild?

Like green iguanas, desert iguanas are also primarily herbivores.They subsist on fruits, buds, and the leaves of local perennial and annual plants found in their habitat.One of their favorite food sources is the yellow flowers found on the creosote bush.

Chuckwalla Iguana

The chuckwalla iguana, much like the desert iguana, lives in areas of the Sonoran and Mojave Deserts, and are also found in southern California, parts of Nevada, Utah, and Arizona.These lizards are stocky, with thick tails, wide bodies, prominent bellies, and flat midsections.The common chuckwalla grows to be around 15″ inches long.

What do Chuckwalla Iguanas Eat in the Wild?

Making their homes primarily in lava flows and in rocky regions within the territory of drought-tolerant scrub, chuckwallas subsist mainly on fruits, leaves, and the flowers of local desert plants (like brittlebush and creosote bush flowers).

Marine Iguanas

Found exclusively on the Galapagos islands, marine iguanas are the only lizards who spend time in the ocean.These remarkable iguanas have adapted to a lifestyle on the island, which includes swimming along rocky shores (they can dive up to 65′ feet underwater), the ability to ingest saltwater and then remove the salt by “sneezing” it out from special “salt glands,” and the unique capability to shrink in size during times of food shortages (especially during weather events like El Nino).Once the food supply is back to normal, they return to their original size.

What do Marine Iguanas Eat in the Wild?

Marine iguanas feed in shallow, ocean waters, and are herbivorous like other iguana species, subsisting on marine algae growing underwater and along the rocky shores of the islands.When feeding, marine iguanas swim along the bottom in a snake-like motion, grazing for algae.

Spiny-Tailed Iguanas

Spiny-tailed iguanas, native to Central America, are commonly found in Costa Rica, Colombia, Honduras, and in feral populations in South Florida.They prefer to live in a rocky habitat with nearby trees for climbing and plenty of rocks and crevices to hide in.The spiny-tailed iguana holds the Guinness Book of World Records list as being the world’s fastest lizard, with a sprinting speed of up to 21 miles an hour!

What does the Spiny-Tailed Iguana Eat in the Wild?

Just like other iguana species, the spiny-tailed iguana is primarily an herbivore, living on leaves, stems, flowers, and fruit.However, they are opportunistic eaters, meaning when available and necessary, they will consume eggs, small animals and rodents, fish, birds, and arthropods.