This is a question that more than 2985 of our readers have been asking us! Luckily, we have found the most appropriate information for you!

Corn snakes are carnivores which means they eat meat. Their most common food is mice, but they can eat small birds, other rodents, small amphibians, and lizards.

Whether you’re new or experienced, it’s always a good idea to brush up on your corn snake diet knowledge. Feed corn snakes small rodents, birds, as well as the occasional amphibian or lizard. Mice are the bread and butter (pun intended) of the corn snake diet. Mice are the perfect size for corn snakes at all ages. Baby corn snakes will eat baby pink mice, and adult corn snakes can eat adult and jumbo mice. The biggest corn snakes (up to 5′) can eat juvenile rats, though. In the wild, corn snakes will climb trees or hunt the ground for small birds and their eggs. It’s challenging to find and keep small birds on hand, and stores don’t stock and sell them. Don’t be surprised if the corn snake is uninterested as an adult. Small amphibians such as frogs are a favorite of the young corn snake. As a general rule, bright colors mean danger, so don’t use those. Baby corn snakes are like adult corn snakes,
but you have a much more significant concern when it comes to prey size and the
prey’s ability to fight back. This is why you need to feed your baby corn snake pinky mice . Even so, you may feel worried about feeding your corn snake the small pinky mice. Help to activate its hunting instincts by braining the mouse or teasing the snake by tapping its nose. Eventually, the corn snake will smell it and begin to show interest. If the corn snake is in its shedding process, it may not be interested in eating even if it’s been seven days. In cases of hibernation or brumation, a corn snake can go for even longer, even 4-6 weeks or more. Hibernation and brumation occur when the corn snake slows its body down to adjust for cooler weather. When in doubt, though, it’s just fine to take your corn snake to an exotic pet vet. While fish aren’t usually a big part of the
corn snake’s diet, it is possible to feed them fish with no health problems as
long as you follow size rules. They’ll eat mostly mice, but if you have access to other small animals like birds, frogs, or young rats, use these as well. Just always remember to use prey smaller than 1.5 times the width of the snake at mid-length.

What can you feed corn snakes other than mice?

Mice aren’t the only appropriate type of corn snake sustenance, however. The young ones also occasionally eat frogs and lizards, while their grownup counterparts occasionally consume birds and bird eggs. Corn snakes that live as zoo captives eat similar meals — think chicks and rodents.

Do corn snakes like to be held?

Corn snake handling should occur least 1-2x weekly, but no more than once daily. Snakes do not require social interaction for their mental health, but handling helps the snake stay tame and can be a good opportunity for exercise as well.

How much should you feed a corn snake?

Corn snakes eat 1 frozen/thawed mouse every 7-14 days, from pinkies to large mouse depending on the size of the corn snake. A large bowl of tap water should be present in their enclosure and will need to be replaced every day. Corn snakes are very easy to feed and almost never refuse a meal.

Can you feed corn snakes live mice?

Most corn snakes learn to eat previously frozen, but fully thawed out, mice. Be prepared to offer a live newborn mouse to baby corn snakes stressed by a new home or not used to thawed mice yet. It usually won’t take many times to train them to take thawed mice.

>> Corn snakes are often killed because they are mistaken for the copperhead, a venomous species. Corn snakes, as well as copperheads, are actually beneficial predators of rodents and in turn are important food items for many other animals.

>> The corn snake is mainly nocturnal and hides during the day under cover of loose tree bark, in animal burrows, or in old abandoned buildings. Corn snakes prefer habitats such as overgrown fields, forest openings, and abandoned or seldom-used buildings where their favorite food of mice and other small rodents is abundant. They are laid in rotting stumps, in piles of decaying vegetation or other similar locations where there is sufficient heat and humidity to incubate them. Young corn snakes often feed on small lizards and frogs until they grow large enough to overpower larger prey. FEEDING HABITS: The diet of an adult corn snake is primarily rodents and other small mammals, but it also includes birds and their eggs.

If you’re thinking that corn snakes are snakes made of corn, we’ll give you points for imagination, but unfortunately, you are wrong. A corn snake is, in fact, a relatively small and harmless North American snake that gets its name from the corn-like pattern on its skin.

Once fully grown, corn snakes usually range from 2.5 to 5 feet in length, and have a lifespan of 5 to 10 years. When you’re ready to choose your corn snake, look for one with no cuts or abrasions, and with bright, alert eyes and a flicking tongue . Corn snakes need to be kept in a temperature of 75 to 85 degrees Fahrenheit, which is pretty easy to achieve with a warming lamp set over the tank. Heat rocks, meanwhile, are generally not recommended because snakes have sensitive skin that is prone to burns. To keep your corn snake happy and stress free, it’s a great idea to fill the tank with plants, branches for curling around on, and boxes to hide in. When the time comes for your corn snake to shed, you will notice that its eyes will turn milky blue a few days before, its skin will go dull and it will take on a whitish sheen.

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And In their natural habitat of southern and central United States, they would readily consume a multitude of prey. Not only are these foodstuffs nutritionally poor, but you would unlikely get a feeding response from the snake anyway. Feeding frequency is related to the age and size of your snake Adults: For fully grown snakes (those that are two years +) I wait a little longer feeding every 14 to 21 days. Corn snakes would probably eat everyday if you provided them the food. They are pretty quick metabolically, but health wise this would only lead to obesity and major weight related issues, and possibly premature death. Finally, when you buy your corn snake always ask what their feeding regime has been. This can be fully dependant on your own schedule regarding time of the day that you choose to feed. The only common side-effect is the fact feeding a chick often causes more loose faecal waste from your snake. Your snakes food will stay fresh for six to nine months if stored correctly Due to the variety of morphs available that can have an effect on natural body build, as well as breeding genetics, it’s hard to define an ideal weight. A snake of healthy weight will have a flat underside, and almost semi-circle body. The idea is for the snake to have as much surface area for traction on their stomach as possible. An overweight snake will be much more rounded, leaving the sides of the belly not touching the ground with movement. An underweight snake will look almost triangle in shape, with the sides pretty straight leading up to the spine. It’s best to consult your exotics vet , and discuss a relevant feeding regime. Unless is a medical issue like parasites, both can be rectified by following a strict dietary regime. Bacteria associated with disease and decay can begin to reproduce in these wet conditions over a period of a few hours. That’s lot of dangerous bacteria to be feeding your corn snake. Once you have properly thawed that prey, you must warm it up before feeding to your corn snake. Some will place the prey in hot water (not boiling) and leave it for five minutes and then offer to the snake. I’ll submerge the top half of the prey in very hot water for about 30 seconds (again, not boiling water) and then offer to the snake via some large metal tongs (forceps). I have had some snakes that wouldn’t take wet prey, so I’d resort to heating the head with a hair-dryer for about five mins. There are disaster stories of exploding mice and rats and that is something I’d not want to be cleaning up. As long as the method you choose allows that prey to be fully thawed no issues will arise. People removing their snake from its setup and feeding in a tub/rub or another tank. People seem to have this notion that if you feed the snake in its setup, it will become setup/cage aggressive. Why would you remove the snake from its established territory, a place where it feels safe, confident and stress free into a tub with none of these? Regurgitation in itself is a huge stress burden for your snake and could lead to possible illness. Regurgitation can also happen if your snake is fed something too large to digest. Pending shed Winter months Incorrect setup temperature Not hungry Food not heated up Fussy Dehydration Illness (mites, mouth rot etc) Winter months: Reptiles are very sensitive to air pressure changes, and you’ll even find some act differently during a storm. Brumation can also occur, which is linked to seasonal changes, and this can lead to a reduced appetite. Fussy eaters: Often a change of feeder prey will break a stubborn corn snake’s food strike. It’s a good idea to rotate food anyway, as you’re then less likely to have a fussy eater on your hands. I provide a large bowl deep enough for the snake to drink from, soak in, to aid shedding or to cool down. If this is the case, while obviously you’ll be annoyed you’ve wasted a feeder, just try the feed again in five to seven days and keep an eye on that snakes weight. This in turn can cause digestive issues and the snake will not want to eat. So it’s vital you have a good heat gradient in that setup with a basking zone of around 30c. A little higher or lower won’t be much of an issue providing there is ample coverage and options to self-regulate. Any significant weight loss, or over long extended time of not eating, please consult your exotic vet as there could well be some underlying issues present. This is due to the stretched skin trying to compensate for the food bulge in the digestive system. And finally, just in case you’re not sure – here’s a recap of the terminology for the different food types…. They have no fur and are high in protein, with a pretty low fat content. They often have the benefit of a belly full of the mothers milk, making them a bundle of calcium (often seen as a white blob through the pinky skin around the stomach area).

What Can You Feed A Corn Snake?

Feed corn snakes small rodents, birds, as well as the occasional amphibian or lizard.Read on for a quick breakdown.
Mice are the bread and butter (pun intended) of the corn snake diet.Even in the wild, their most common prey is mice.Mice are the perfect size for corn snakes at all ages.Baby corn snakes will eat baby pink mice, and adult corn snakes can eat adult and jumbo mice.They’re usually given to the snake either live or thawed from frozen.The live ones are better for the snakes because they activate their hunting instincts.Frozen and then thawed mice will work, and they’re easier to keep in stock.
Rats are often too large for many corn snakes to eat.The biggest corn snakes (up to 5′) can eat juvenile rats, though.
In the wild, corn snakes will climb trees or hunt the ground for small birds and their eggs.This is typically only done by adult corn snakes.In captivity, there isn’t a suitable equivalent.It’s challenging to find and keep small birds on hand, and stores don’t stock and sell them.
In the wild, baby corn snakes and juvenile corn snakes can find small lizards to eat.I don’t imagine you’re going to be keeping these as feed for your snake, but you could use small lizards as long as they were smaller than 1.5 times the girth of the snake’s body at mid-length.Don’t be surprised if the corn snake is uninterested as an adult.At this age, they prefer meatier rodents and birds.
Small amphibians such as frogs are a favorite of the young corn snake.If you found some in the wild, you could consider feeding them to your pet.But just like the last category, you always need to check their size.Also, take care of the frogs aren’t poisonous.As a general rule, bright colors mean danger, so don’t use those.

What To Feed A Baby Corn Snake

Baby corn snakes are like adult corn snakes, but you have a much more significant concern when it comes to prey size and the prey’s ability to fight back.This is why you need to feed your baby corn snake pinky mice.These newborn, hairless mice are perfect for these small snakes.Their size matches the 1.5 times size or under the requirement.On top of this, the newborn mice won’t bite back as older mice will.Even so, you may feel worried about feeding your corn snake the small pinky mice.When you’re looking for even smaller prey, consider the baby pygmy mouse or baby spiny mouse.Still, the baby corn snake may not be too interested naturally.Help to activate its hunting instincts by braining the mouse or teasing the snake by tapping its nose.Read more about

How Do I Get My Corn Snake To Eat?

First, make sure it’s been around five days since its last meal.It may not be hungry.Then, place the mouse in front of the corn snake.You need to activate its hunting instincts.If the mouse is live, there won’t be much of a problem getting it to eat in time.If the mouse is frozen and thawed, cut the mouse a little to put the scent of food in the air.You may also want to let the mouse sit in a plastic container with holes in the top for a while.Eventually, the corn snake will smell it and begin to show interest.This is when you take it out and let the snake have at it.

How Long Can A Corn Snake Go Without Eating?

A corn snake is just fine eating every 7-10 days for adults and every 5-7 days for baby corn snakes.But this isn’t the only answer.If the corn snake is in its shedding process, it may not be interested in eating even if it’s been seven days.When you see signs of shedding, don’t be alarmed if it doesn’t eat.In cases of hibernation or brumation, a corn snake can go for even longer, even 4-6 weeks or more.Hibernation and brumation occur when the corn snake slows its body down to adjust for cooler weather.When in doubt, though, it’s just fine to take your corn snake to an exotic pet vet.They can examine your reptile with a professional eye.
Never feed a snake within 24 hours of its last feeding. The corn snake needs longer than this to digest its meal fully.

Can You Feed A Corn Snake Fish?

While fish aren’t usually a big part of the corn snake’s diet, it is possible to feed them fish with no health problems as long as you follow size rules.Minnows work well, and some of the larger corn snakes can even eat a larger bass.Keep in mind, though, their natural food of rodents and birds.I recommend avoiding feeding them fish too often, or its nutritional balance may be thrown off.

Corn Snake Pantherophis guttatus

9 Interesting Facts About Corn Snakes

>> Corn snakes are often killed because they are mistaken for the copperhead, a venomous species. Corn snakes, as well as copperheads, are actually beneficial predators of rodents and in turn are important food items for many other animals.>> The corn snake, also known as the red rat snake, is one of several species of rat snakes occurring in the United States. Rat snakes are large, powerful, nonvenomous snakes that feed on a variety of prey species, which they overpower by constriction.>> While not venomous, corn snakes will bite. Their striking range is quite long, about 1/3 to 1/2 of their body length.>> Young corn snakes are a favored food item of coral snakes and kingsnakes.>> The genus name Elaphe is derived from the Latin word elaps (a kind of snake). The species name guttata is from the Latin gutta (dappled or spotted), a reference to the blotches on the snake’s back.>> The corn snake is mainly nocturnal and hides during the day under cover of loose tree bark, in animal burrows, or in old abandoned buildings.>> Predators of the corn snake include foxes, opossums, skunks, bobcats, weasels, and hawks.>> The corn snake is most active from March to November. This species is encountered more frequently in the summer months when it crosses roads at night.>> The corn snake can be distinguished from other rat snakes and from kingsnakes by the stripe extending from the back of its eye past the corner of its jaw, plus the large, bold black and white checkerboard pattern on its belly.

did you know?

IDENTIFYING CHARACTERISTICS:

Corn Snakes are highly variable in coloration and pattern depending on the age of the snake and the region of the country in which it is found. They are generally very colorful snakes with most adults displaying vivid colors of reddish or orange blotches edged in black with a grayish to orange colored background tinged with yellow. The belly of the snake usually consists of alternating rows of black and white, resembling a checkerboard pattern. The overall appearance of the snake reminds one of brightly colored Indian corn from which it probably gets its common name.

RANGE:

This is a southeastern rat snake, ranging from Virginia and Maryland south into Florida, west to Louisiana and Mississippi, and as far north as southern Tennessee. There are isolated populations in Kentucky.

HABITAT:

Corn snakes tend to be quite secretive and appear to be active mostly at night. During daylight hours they may be found hiding under loose tree bark and beneath logs, rocks, and other debris. Corn snakes prefer habitats such as overgrown fields, forest openings, and abandoned or seldom-used buildings where their favorite food of mice and other small rodents is abundant.

NESTING:

Corn snakes usually breed in spring (April-June)with females laying their eggs in early summer (July). The eggs are not cared for by the adult snake. They are laid in rotting stumps, in piles of decaying vegetation or other similar locations where there is sufficient heat and humidity to incubate them. The eggs hatch in 2 to 3 months. Young corn snakes often feed on small lizards and frogs until they grow large enough to overpower larger prey. Only a few hatchlings survive to adulthood because of predation by a variety of other animals.

Snake Bytes: Corn Snake Care

If you’re thinking that corn snakes are snakes made of corn, we’ll give you points for imagination, but unfortunately, you are wrong. A corn snake is, in fact, a relatively small and harmless North American snake that gets its name from the corn-like pattern on its skin.Corn snakes make great first pets for a responsible kid that has a keen interest in snakes, but it is still important to do thorough research before getting the snake to make sure it is a good fit and that you’re up for the commitment

How Big Do Corn Snakes Get and How Long Do They Live?

Once fully grown, corn snakes usually range from 2.5 to 5 feet in length, and have a lifespan of 5 to 10 years. They can even live longer when given proper care, so please make sure you are ready for a long-term commitment.

Choosing Your New Pet

When you’re ready to choose your corn snake, look for one with no cuts or abrasions, and with bright, alert eyes and a flicking tongue. These are all signs of a healthy snake.Now, on to the nitty-gritty: caring for a corn snake.

Corn Snake Tanks

Remember that reptiles, like other creatures, will grow to their proper size, regardless of whether you have a big or small space for them. As no one (particularly your snake) enjoys cramped quarters, a roomy home is of utmost importance. A 30- to 40-gallon tank should be large enough for your corn snake to move and grow in.As with any snake tank, however, you’ll need to have a secured top to prevent any great escapes by your snake. A mesh lid is probably best, so that the tank will have appropriate ventilation. Corn snakes need to be kept in a temperature of 75 to 85 degrees Fahrenheit, which is pretty easy to achieve with a warming lamp set over the tank. The tank should have a “warm” zone (82 degrees) and a cool zone, with a hiding area available in each zone. Your local pet shop will have a selection to choose from. Heat rocks, meanwhile, are generally not recommended because snakes have sensitive skin that is prone to burns. Do not use reptile sand as bedding on the bottom of the tank, it can get into their nostrils and cause congestion. Pine bedding is not recommended either, as the oils can be toxic to corn snake.To keep your corn snake happy and stress free, it’s a great idea to fill the tank with plants, branches for curling around on, and boxes to hide in. Snakes can get traumatized when they have no place to hide, so give your snake both room to move and accessories to feel secure. Just make sure not to use live plants, as the fertilizer in the soil can be harmful to the snake. Use rocks and treated wood available in pet stores.

What Do Corn Snakes Eat?

Corn snakes primarily eat rodents. They are constrictor snakes, meaning that they catch thier prey and squeeze it. Even if you are feeding your snake dead rodents, you may want to give your snake the feeling that it is catching its own food. When it comes to mealtime, defrost the (dead) mouse and let it warm to room temperature. Offer it to the snake by holding it by the tail (feeding forceps are a really good idea) and dangle the mouse in front of the snake so it can strike the mouse, grab it, and go to work at swallowing its meal.Quail eggs make great treats for your snake, but only occasionally — about one every few weeks. Keep in mind that in the wild, eggs are an uncommon treat, not part of a regular diet. Fresh, clean water should always be available. This is essential.

Preventing Illness

To avoid bacteria and fungus from accumulating in the tank, make sure to clean the tank regularly, removing feces and urine as soon as possible. Snakes shed their old skin as they grow, and this is an amazing process to observe, since they shed their entire skin, slipping out of it like an old stocking.When the time comes for your corn snake to shed, you will notice that its eyes will turn milky blue a few days before, its skin will go dull and it will take on a whitish sheen. When its eyes clear again, the snake is ready to shed. You can give your snake a shallow dish of tepid water to soak itself in as it goes through the shedding process.Corn snakes, like other creatures, are susceptible to parasites and illnesses — many of which are deadly. Because of this, have your snake tested for parasites when you first purchase the animal. If your snake is listless or sick, take any vomit or feces along to the veterinarian for testing.

Final Corn Snake Care Tips

So now you have a few facts under your belt. But consider this before you bring a snake home: make sure that no one in your home is very afraid of snakes (ophidiophobia), and think very carefully before bringing a snake into a home with small children, as toddlers don’t have the maturity to remember rules about not opening tanks, and they have not yet learned how to be gentle with small creatures.

Can corn snakes eat roaches, vegetables, eggs, fish, beef or pork?

I feed my corn snake, as well as other snakes: rats, mice, chicks, hamsters, gerbils, quail, multimammate mice and guinea pigs.All of the above I purchase frozen. Northampton Reptile Centre who will deliver to your door.So as you see, there’s no real excuse for not having variety, even with a snake.Skip to content:

How often should you feed a corn snake?

This for me is very much age and snake size related, as well as the feeder/prey size.For the first couple of months the corn will only be able to have pinkies. Even rat pups will be too big for those first couple of months.After this period you’ll be good to rotate feeders. Rats and mice should be offered, in fact rats are nutritionally better as there’s more muscle and less fat.But of course variety is also great and my preferred option.You may like: Corn snake setup costs

When to feed pinkies and fuzzies to corn snakes

Snakes will have different weights at the same age, depending on the diet given where you made your snake purchase.For me, if I have a young or hatchling corn I feed pinkies up until the corns weight is around 25-30g.I then move up a feeder size to fuzzy.Overall though. When deciding on what mice or rat size to feed your corn it’s a good rule to go with a feeder that is roughly the size, in width, of the snakes mid-body section.Slightly bigger won’t be an issue, but too big and it can lead to issues such as regurgitation and stress. Either way, it’s not good.And you need to remember, if you go for bigger food increase the time between feeds.It’s certainly not uncommon for a corn snake that has been fed a weaner rat, to then not be fed again for 10 to 14 days, sometimes longer. And absolutely no issues will arise.Corn snakes would probably eat everyday if you provided them the food. They are pretty quick metabolically, but health wise this would only lead to obesity and major weight related issues, and possibly premature death.You can often tell when your corn is wanting food as it will actively “hunt”, pacing up and down, and fully exploring the setup searching for food.Of course allowing them to do this for a few days is not causing any issues, and certainly no cause for giving in and feeding if a feed is not due. In-fact, the ‘hunting’ behaviour can be considered a good form of exercise.Finally, when you buy your corn snake always ask what their feeding regime has been. They will be able to give you a full breakdown without any issue.

What is the best time to feed a corn snake?

This can be fully dependant on your own schedule regarding time of the day that you choose to feed.As long as you have good feeding regime when it comes to how frequently you feed. the time of day is almost irrelevant.I’ve known keepers to have a corn that wouldn’t feed with their lights (uvb) on, and only when it was dark. But that’s not common.

What treats to give a corn snake?

There is little in the way of treats to give your corn snake.Many consider the likes of ‘chicks’ a treat item. But nutritionally, apart from being slightly more fatty, they are not to dissimilar to their usual food.The only common side-effect is the fact feeding a chick often causes more loose faecal waste from your snake.This in turn causes them to be placed in the “treat food” bracket. And I’d go with that too.

How long can you keep frozen mice in the freezer?

A good guide to go by is up to six months for hair and/or fur-less prey. And six to nine months for those with hair, fur or feathers.They can probably last a little longer if the packaging is unopened.You should always use a proper deep freeze freezer, not just the quick freeze compartment at the top of your fridge.Also packaging plays an important role here, as little air as possible is best. And a good thick freezer bag should be used if they are not already individually bagged and sealed.Anything exposed to the freezer via a ripped bag, or un-bagged will get freezer burns. These tend to look all crystallised and almost grey in colour.The snake would probably still eat them once thawed out, and it’s unlikely it would make them ill, however it’s still not a nice thought to feed them to your snake.If the taste and texture doesn’t taste very good, and you wouldn’t eat it – why submit your corn to it 🙂

How to defrost frozen mice for snakes

Due to the variety of morphs available that can have an effect on natural body build, as well as breeding genetics, it’s hard to define an ideal weight.I’d recommend keep a personal record of your snakes weight. Weighing every month is a good idea. This will help you understand fluctuations and what’s ‘normal’ for your snake.As for what to look for, it’s probably easiest to go by the shape of the snake via the circumference.The idea is for the snake to have as much surface area for traction on their stomach as possible.If you have a snake that is either under or overweight. It’s best to consult your exotics vet, and discuss a relevant feeding regime.Unless is a medical issue like parasites, both can be rectified by following a strict dietary regime.

How to give food to snakes

Once you have properly thawed that prey, you must warm it up before feeding to your corn snake.Some will place the prey in hot water (not boiling) and leave it for five minutes and then offer to the snake.Personally, I’m a dunker. I’ll submerge the top half of the prey in very hot water for about 30 seconds (again, not boiling water) and then offer to the snake via some large metal tongs (forceps). This method has served me very well over the years.I have had some snakes that wouldn’t take wet prey, so I’d resort to heating the head with a hair-dryer for about five mins. It was a total pain in the backside but needs must as they say.I’ve known some to also use a microwave. This is something I have never done and I wouldn’t recommend doing such.There are disaster stories of exploding mice and rats and that is something I’d not want to be cleaning up.As long as the method you choose allows that prey to be fully thawed no issues will arise.

Why is my corn snake so aggressive after feeding?

This is something that annoys me. I see it in my Snake group on Facebook (Snake Network), as well as other groups. People removing their snake from its setup and feeding in a tub/rub or another tank.People seem to have this notion that if you feed the snake in its setup, it will become setup/cage aggressive. No.The setup is the snakes territory. Why would you remove the snake from its established territory, a place where it feels safe, confident and stress free into a tub with none of these?And then move the snake back into its setup. Again, major stress alert, while also risking regurgitation.If the snake is aggressive in and around its setup, its just being a snake. Feeding outside of this will not change this situation.If anything it will just cause stress, which in-turn, can cause illness to your snake.So please feed your snake in its own setup.

How long does it take for a corn snake to digest food?

Providing you have the correct temperature within the setup (see my corn snake care guide here on ExoticDirect), the 48 hour “rule” is a great guide.

Can you handle a snake after it eats?

You shouldn’t handle your corn (or any snake) for 48 hours after a feed in order to allow the snake to fully digest its meal.

Corn snake regurgitation

If you handle your snake when it’s just eaten you risk stressing your snake out and causing it to regurgitate its meal. Regurgitation in itself is a huge stress burden for your snake and could lead to possible illness.Regurgitation can also happen if your snake is fed something too large to digest. If this does happen try not to panic. Wait a few more days, and feed something much smaller.

Feeding corn snakes when shedding

The main issues would be:Winter months: Reptiles are very sensitive to air pressure changes, and you’ll even find some act differently during a storm.Regardless of your setup, the changing weather can impact your reptiles appetite. Brumation can also occur, which is linked to seasonal changes, and this can lead to a reduced appetite.Fussy eaters: Often a change of feeder prey will break a stubborn corn snake’s food strike. From mice to rats, or vice versa.It’s a good idea to rotate food anyway, as you’re then less likely to have a fussy eater on your hands.If your corn has not taken the food you can leave it in the setup for another two or three hours as some will not take food when you are in their territory. If it’s not taken after this period then you must discard it.Dehydration: It’s essential you provide water for your snake – dehydration can lead to ill health and loss of appetite. Snakes will drink via their mouth.I provide a large bowl deep enough for the snake to drink from, soak in, to aid shedding or to cool down.Growing: It’s also not uncommon for a corn snake to miss a scheduled feed or two while growing. If this is the case, while obviously you’ll be annoyed you’ve wasted a feeder, just try the feed again in five to seven days and keep an eye on that snakes weight. And make sure that the snake has adequate hydration.Incorrect temperature: One of the most common issues I see is incorrect temperature. This will stop a snake from feeding, regardless of species.With a digestion time of 24 to 48 hours in the correct conditions, any lower temperature will cause food to take longer to digest. This in turn can cause digestive issues and the snake will not want to eat.So it’s vital you have a good heat gradient in that setup with a basking zone of around 30c. A little higher or lower won’t be much of an issue providing there is ample coverage and options to self-regulate.Again, check out my article on the correct corn snake setup, written for ExoticDirect.Any significant weight loss, or over long extended time of not eating, please consult your exotic vet as there could well be some underlying issues present.