What Do Bunnies Eat?

Rabbits love their food and enjoy fresh fruits and vegetables as part of a balanced diet. The main part of a rabbits diet should be unlimited amounts of fresh hay (preferably Timothy or Meadow Hay), grass, and plenty of clean water available. See ‘What do rabbits eat?’ for more information.

Rabbits, like humans are all different and as such some may be unable to tolerate certain foods. Only give a small amount and wait for 24 hours, if your rabbit produces soft poo, withdraw the food and try with something else after everything has settled back to normal.

Always wash food first and don’t feed plants from roadsides or that contain pesticides. The first rule of feeding bunnies and their delicate tummies is: if in doubt – don’t let them eat it! Rabbits have strong tastebuds and will try anything even if it’s poisonous – it’s up to you to protect them!

A good guideline is to feed a minimum of 1 cup of vegetables for each 4 lbs of body weight per day. Artichoke leaves Asparagus Baby Sweetcorns (but not full size ones) Beetroot (care with leafy tops as high levels of oxalic acid) – can cause gas so limit Broccoli (and its leaves, including purple sprouting varieties) – can cause gas so limit Brussel Sprouts (leaves and sprouts) – can cause gas so limit Cabbage (can sometimes cause digestive upsets) – can cause gas so limit Carrots (& carrot tops) not the roots as they are high in sugars. Carrots should be limited due to high sugar content.

Cauliflower (and the leaves) Celeriac Celery leaves Chicory Courgette (and flowers) Cucumber Curly Kale Fennel Green beans Kohl rabi Peas (including the leaves and pods) Peppers (red, green and yellow) Pumpkin Radish Tops – can cause gas so limit Rocket (also known as Arugula) Romaine lettuce (not Iceberg or light coloured leaf) Spinach (only occasional) Spring Greens Squash (e.g. Butternut) Swede Turnip (only occasional) Watercress Fruits should be fed in moderation due to sugar content (up to 2 tablespoons worth per day) . Do not feed the pips, stones, plants etc of fruits unless otherwise stated, as most of the time they are poisonous!

Rabbits love sugary fruit and will eat too much of it, which is bad for them. Apricot Banana (high in potassium) Blackberries (and leaves excellent astringent properties) Blueberries Cherries (not the pits and plant – they contain cyanide and are therefore poisonous!) Grapes Kiwi Fruit Mango Melon Nectarines Papaya Peaches Pears Pineapple Plums Raspberries (and leaves excellent astringent properties) Strawberries (and leaves) Tomatoes ( NOT the leaves)

They can taste very strong so offer a little to start with to get your bunnies used to them. Basil Coriander (also known as Cilantro Dill Mint (peppermint) Parsley – not too much as high in calcium Oregano Rosemary Sage Thyme Double-check which plants are in your garden before letting your bunnies loose!

Borage Calendula Camomile Chickweed (astringent) Clover (leaves and flowers) Coltsfoot Comfrey Dandelion (diuretic properties) Goosegrass (cleavers) but may stick to coat! Lavender Mallow Nettle Nasturtium (leaves and flowers) Shepherds purse Sow Thistle Plantain Yarrow Chewing on hay grinds your rabbit’s ever-growing teeth down to a safe level, preventing ulcers, abscesses and eye problems.

Rabbits need to eat their body-size in fresh hay each daycontinue reading A lot of pet shops sell ‘treats’ that are full of sugar and very bad for your rabbit and his health. You can give them occasional treats that are also healthy, such as certain fruits and sweet vegetables such as carrot.

What should I feed my bunny?

Rabbits should have a daily diet of mostly hay, a smaller amount of fresh vegetables, and a limited number of pellets. Hay is the most important part of a rabbit’s daily intake. Unlimited, high-quality grass hay, such as Timothy, orchard or brome, should make up the bulk of a rabbit’s diet.

What human food can bunnies eat?

Fruit. Pretty much any fruit will make a good sweet treat, though the high sugar content means it should only be given in moderation. ….Vegetables. Similarly, most vegetables are safe for rabbits to eat. ….Herbs. ….Garden plants. ….Chocolate. ….Iceberg Lettuce. ….Avocado. ….Meat.

What should rabbits not eat?

Yogurt Drops. ….Bread, Pasta, Cookies, and Crackers. ….Avocado. ….Cereal. ….Iceberg Lettuce. ….Silverbeet. ….Hamster Food. ….Walnuts.

What do bunnies drink?

Yes, water is your bunny’s best drink. This makes sense because, just like many mammals, rabbits are made up of about 73 percent water. Water is needed for the body to function. Rabbits need water for the same reasons people and other mammals do.

What should pet bunnies eat? Contrary to popular belief, rabbits need to eat more than just carrots and lettuce. They require a balanced diet of hay, fresh veggies and fruit, and a few pellets. Rabbits have very sensitive digestive tracts, so the transition to hay or pellets, or the introduction of new fruits and vegetables, must be done gradually to allow the rabbits system to adjust.

You can feed your bunnies either one type or a mixture of different grass hays. Buy the freshest hay possible and check for the presence of mold or dust, which could make your rabbit sick.

Alfalfa hay is not a good choice for an adult rabbit, since its a legume, not a grass, and as such is too rich to be fed on a daily basis. Timothy hay pellets can be given to bunnies in small quantities. Rabbits larger than 10 pounds do not need more than a quarter of a cup, since its not a crucial part of a bunnys diet.

Most greens found in a supermarket are safe for rabbits, with a few limitations and exceptions. Dwarf breeds and rabbits under five pounds should get just one cup of fresh veggies per day. Add one new vegetable at a time, and watch for signs of loose stool or diarrhea because, as mentioned above, bunnies have delicate digestive systems.

Certain vegetables can be given every day, while others should be fed sparingly, one or two times a week. Do not feed your rabbit potatoes, corn, beans, seeds or nuts. Bell peppers Bok choy Brussels sprouts Carrot tops Cucumber Endive Escarole Fennel Herbs: basil, cilantro, dill, mint, oregano, parsley, rosemary, sage, thyme Lettuces: romaine, green leaf, red leaf, Boston bibb, arugula, butter Okra leaves Radicchio Radish tops Sprouts: alfalfa, radish, clover Watercress Wheatgrass Zucchini

Vegetables and plants to give sparingly (one or two times a week) to a bunny: Broccoli (stems and leaves only) Carrots Chard Clover Collard greens Dandelion greens (pesticide-free) Flowers: calendula, chamomile, daylily, dianthus, English daisy, hibiscus, honeysuckle, marigold, nasturtium, pansy, rose Kale Spinach The appropriate serving is one to two tablespoons of fruit (either one kind or a mixture) per five pounds of body weight.

Apple (no seeds) Banana Berries: blueberries, blackberries, strawberries, raspberries, cranberries Cherries (no seeds) Grapes Melon Nectarine Orange Papaya Peach Pear Pineapple Plum Watermelon As with humans, treats are at the top of the food pyramid for bunnies and therefore should be fed sparingly. Healthy treats for your bunny include small pieces of fresh or freeze-dried fruit (the approved fruits listed above); natural, unprocessed mixes that include hay and dried flowers (the approved flowers listed above); and Oxbow brand rabbit treats.

Always read the ingredient list on store-bought treats because not all of them are safe for bunnies. All human treats Beans Beet greens Cabbage Cauliflower Cereal Chocolate Corn or corn-cob treats Crackers Iceberg lettuce Legumes Mustard greens Nuts Pasta Peas Potatoes Rhubarb Seeds Sugar Turnip greens Yogurt Finally, rabbits need to stay hydrated, so they should have an unlimited supply of fresh water, which should be changed daily.

Water bottles are not easy to clean and can be difficult for rabbits to use, so bowls are better. A heavy ceramic bowl is ideal, since it doesnt tip over easily. About Best Friends Animal Society: A leader in the no-kill movement, Best Friends runs the nation’s largest no-kill sanctuary for companion animals, as well as lifesaving programs in collaboration with thousands of partners nationwide working to Save Them All.

While the bulk of their feeding can be made up of hay and pellets, its nice to throw some other things into the mix now and then both as a treat and to ensure theyre getting a wide range of nutrients.

Picture: Shutterstock Pretty much any fruit will make a good sweet treat, though the high sugar content means it should only be given in moderation. Beetroot, Brussels Sprouts and cabbage can cause gas so should be limited, while carrots are quite high in sugar so no rabbit should be chomping on them as often as Bugs Bunny was.

Romaine lettuce, curly kale, asparagus, celery just about any of your standard greens will make fine rabbit food. Rabbits have exceptionally strong taste buds, so its best to only give them small amounts but standard herbs like rosemary, sage or thyme can liven up their meal. Youll need to check carefully before letting your rabbit loose on whatevers growing in your back garden, but plenty of common plants are perfect for them to nibble on.

If you are sharing a salad with your bunny pal, its important to make sure the lettuce isnt of the iceberg variety it can contain Lactucarium, which can be harmful in large quantities. Avocado contains a chemical called Persin which can cause respiratory problems in rabbits and even prove fatal.

Rabbits are herbivores (plant eaters) and are considered grazers, in that they eat continuously. They have complex digestive systems and are very efficient at processing food. They also have very specific dietary needs. If you introduce new foods too quickly, or feed inappropriate food choices, the rabbit’s normal digestive flora (normal bacteria) will be disturbed, gas- and toxin-producing bacteria can overgrow, and the rabbit may become very sick and possibly die.

Unlimited, high-quality grass hay, such as Timothy, orchard or brome, should make up the bulk of a rabbit’s diet. Grass hay is high in fiber, which is critical to maintaining a rabbits healthy digestive tract.

Introduce new vegetables slowly and in small quantities, and monitor for soft feces, diarrhea, or signs of gas pain. Other acceptable vegetables include broccoli, green peppers, Brussel sprouts, endive, wheat grass, radicchio, and squash. The high sugar content in fruits (and even carrots) may upset the normal GI tract bacteria if given in excess.

Rabbit Diet: What to Feed a Bunny

What should pet bunnies eat? Contrary to popular belief, rabbits need to eat more than just carrots and lettuce. They require a balanced diet of hay, fresh veggies and fruit, and a few pellets. Rabbits have very sensitive digestive tracts, so the transition to hay or pellets, or the introduction of new fruits and vegetables, must be done gradually to allow the rabbit’s system to adjust.

Hay: The staple of a rabbit’s diet

The bottom of a rabbit food pyramid would contain long-stemmed fiber, in the form of hay, which makes up 80 to 90 percent of a rabbit’s diet. As grazing animals, rabbits need to have an unlimited supply of fresh hay daily.You’ll want to feed your rabbit grass hays. Good types of grass hay for bunnies are timothy, orchard grass, brome and oat hay. You can feed your bunnies either one type or a mixture of different grass hays. Buy the freshest hay possible and check for the presence of mold or dust, which could make your rabbit sick.Alfalfa hay is not a good choice for an adult rabbit, since it’s a legume, not a grass, and as such is too rich to be fed on a daily basis. Alfalfa can be given to rabbits once in awhile as a treat. Rabbits under one year of age can be fed alfalfa hay, but as they get older they should be switched to grass hay, especially if they are also being fed alfalfa pellets.

Pellets: Feed a bunny small quantities

Timothy hay pellets can be given to bunnies in small quantities. An average-sized (6-10 pounds) adult rabbit only needs one-quarter cup of pellets daily. If your rabbit is under five pounds, feed just one-eighth of a cup. Rabbits larger than 10 pounds do not need more than a quarter of a cup, since it’s not a crucial part of a bunny’s diet.Rabbits under one year old can be fed alfalfa pellets. Be sure to feed grass hay (rather than alfalfa) if you are feeding your young rabbit alfalfa pellets. Look for pellets with a high fiber content — the higher the better. Do not buy the rabbit pellets that have dried corn, nuts and seeds added, because those foods can potentially be very harmful for rabbits.

Treats: Feed to a rabbit sparingly

Rabbits count vegetables and herbs among their favorite foods. Most greens found in a supermarket are safe for rabbits, with a few limitations and exceptions. (See the list of foods to avoid below.)No more than two cups daily of fresh vegetables should be given to adult rabbits. Dwarf breeds and rabbits under five pounds should get just one cup of fresh veggies per day. A variety of two or three vegetables is ideal. Add one new vegetable at a time, and watch for signs of loose stool or diarrhea because, as mentioned above, bunnies have delicate digestive systems. Certain vegetables can be given every day, while others should be fed sparingly, one or two times a week.Do not feed your rabbit potatoes, corn, beans, seeds or nuts. These foods are difficult for rabbits to digest and can cause serious digestive problems.Vegetables that can be fed to a rabbit daily:Vegetables and plants to give sparingly (one or two times a week) to a bunny:

Fruit

Pretty much any fruit will make a good sweet treat, though the high sugar content means it should only be given in moderation.It’s also important to remove any pips or stones that could become choking hazards.Bananas, apples, strawberries and raspberries have all proven a hit.However, acidic fruits like oranges should be avoided as rabbit digestive systems are too delicate for them.

Vegetables

Similarly, most vegetables are safe for rabbits to eat.Beetroot, Brussels Sprouts and cabbage can cause gas so should be limited, while carrots are quite high in sugar so no rabbit should be chomping on them as often as Bugs Bunny was.Rabbits are not cats and therefore are not afraid of cucumbers, so these make perfectly good snacks.Romaine lettuce, curly kale, asparagus, celery – just about any of your standard greens will make fine rabbit food.

Herbs

Rabbits have exceptionally strong taste buds, so it’s best to only give them small amounts but standard herbs like rosemary, sage or thyme can liven up their meal.Feed your rabbit mint leaves to keep her minty fresh!

Garden plants

You’ll need to check carefully before letting your rabbit loose on whatever’s growing in your back garden, but plenty of common plants are perfect for them to nibble on.Nettles, dandelions, sow thistles and lavender are all fine.

Chocolate

Never give a rabbit chocolate – it is extremely poisonous to them!

Iceberg Lettuce

If you are sharing a salad with your bunny pal, it’s important to make sure the lettuce isn’t of the iceberg variety – it can contain Lactucarium, which can be harmful in large quantities.

Avocado

Avocado contains a chemical called Persin which can cause respiratory problems in rabbits and even prove fatal. A definite no.

How often should I feed my rabbit?

Rabbits should have a daily diet of mostly hay, a smaller amount of fresh vegetables, and a limited number of pellets. Hay is the most important part of a rabbit’s daily intake. Unlimited, high-quality grass hay, such as Timothy, orchard or brome, should make up the bulk of a rabbit’s diet. Grass hay is high in fiber, which is critical to maintaining a rabbit’s healthy digestive tract. While young, growing rabbits can eat any type of grass hay,Timothy pellets can be offered at approximately 1/8-1/4 cup per 5 lbs (2.25 kg) of bodyweight. Over-feeding pellets to adult rabbits is a common cause of obesity and soft stool (caused by an overgrowth of abnormal bacteria in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract), as pellets are generally low in fiber and high in carbohydrates. In addition to hay, wild rabbits eat a lot of other fresh vegetation.A pet rabbit’s diet should be supplemented with a variety of leafy green vegetables every day. Rabbits can consume as many vegetables as they want to each day as long as they do not get diarrhea and as long as the vegetables are not high in carbohydrates, as carrots and potatoes are. Variety is important. Introduce new vegetables slowly and in small quantities, and monitor for soft feces, diarrhea, or signs of gas pain.Particularly good vegetables include the dark leafy greens like romaine lettuce, bok choy, mustard greens, carrot tops, cilantro, watercress, basil, kohlrabi, beet greens, broccoli greens, and cilantro.Some leafy greens, such as collard and dandelion greens, parsley, kale, Swiss chard, and escarole, should be fed in limited quantities, as they are high in calcium and may contribute to the development of calcium-based bladder stones if fed in excess. Other acceptable vegetables include broccoli, green peppers, Brussel sprouts, endive, wheat grass, radicchio, and squash. Iceberg or head lettuce should not be fed, as it is mainly water and contains few nutrients.Carrots should be fed sparingly, as they are very high in carbohydrate and may upset GI bacterial flora. A small amount of many different vegetables is much better than a large amount of one food item.Young rabbits, under approximately 7-8 months old, should be fed alfalfa pellets and alfalfa hay free-choice; they need the extra protein and calcium as they grow. They, too, can have a variety of vegetables. At approximately 7 months, they must be weaned onto an adult diet, as described above, since their growth slows down.

What are the water requirements of rabbits?

Yes, but first be sure to check with your veterinarian about the types of treats that are recommended. Rabbits certainly can become overweight if fed an abundance of high-calorie treats. Cookies, nuts, seeds, grains, and bread shouldFruits can be fed in very limited quantities – no more than 1-2 tablespoons of high-fiber fresh fruit (such as apple, pear, or berries) every 1-2 days. The high sugar content in fruits (and even carrots) may upset the normal GI tract bacteria if given in excess.