What Cats Are Hypoallergenic?

Want to adopt a cat, but suffer from allergies? Maybe youve tried coping by taking antihistamines, and have a HEPA air filter in your home. You may have even heard the term “hypoallergenic pet” but not know it applies to cats.

Cats do produce pet dander, a common allergen, but the culprit for the estimated 10 percent of the population who are allergic to cats may be a protein, Fel d 1, that is present in cat saliva. However, there are breeds that produce less of it and therefore make good cats for people with allergies.

The following list of “hypoallergeniccats is a guideline which petMD recommends for people who want to adopt a feline, yet feel options are limited due to allergies:

What's the best cat for someone with allergies?

Balinese. Since this intelligent, energetic cutie produces a little less Fel d 1 and has a single layer coat, he’s often a great choice for people with mild cat allergies, even though he’s a little fluffy. ….Javanese. ….Russian Blue. ….Bengal. ….Cornish Rex. ….Devon Rex. ….Oriental Shorthair.

Are any cats really hypoallergenic?

Despite popular belief, hypoallergenic cats don’t exist. The reason some cats are recommended over others for allergy sufferers is due to how much protein they produce.

What cats dont cause allergies?

Sphynx Cats. Although hairless Sphynx cats still have Fel D1 protein, they shed less of it around the house because they don’t lose fur. ….Siberian Cats. ….Cornish and Devon Rex Cats. ….Bengal Cats. ….Russian Blue Cats. ….Balinese Cats.

Allergies taking a toll on you? Constant sneezing and itching can deter from affection youd like to give cats. Youre not alone. In fact, people are twice as likely to have cat allergies than dog allergies. Still, furry felines are hard to resist.

We recommend contacting an animal shelter or rescue group and arranging to meet the pet before making a decision. But it is one of the few breeds that produce less of the Fel D1 protein than other cats, thus causing fewer allergic reactions in allergy sufferers.

Highly social, Balinese are sensitive to your mood and are more than willing to cheer you up with some happy chatter if youre feeling gloomy. They are considered non-allergenic cats, but its still a good practice to groom your Oriental frequently to keep dander to a minimum. This breed is perfect if you want a responsive cat thats easy to train and likes showing affection by purring in your ear and following you around.

Devons have been compared to elves and space aliens for their jumbo satellite-dish ears, large, mischievous window-to-the-soul eyes, and ethereal appearance. According to the French breed standard, the Sphynx personality traits are often compared to dogs children based on its animated nature. To say Sphynxes are lively is an understatement; theyll keep you entertained performing aerialist feats from the top of doorways and bookshelves.

Very devoted and loyal, they follow their humans around, wagging their tails doggy fashion and purring with affection. Like the Balinese, the Siberian sports a moderately long coat, but still is hypoallergenic due to the lower-than-average enzyme levels in their saliva. Despite their size, they are very agile and are great jumpers, able to leap tall bookcases in a single bound.

If you’re a cat lover with mild cat allergies, it still might be possible for you to have a cat in your home. Although no cat breed is scientifically hypoallergenic, anecdotal reports claim some breeds might be less likely to trigger allergies. This is potentially because of their shedding level or because they produce less of the Fel d 1 protein, a common allergen. The cat breeds that are supposedly good for allergies vary in appearance and temperament. Some are related breeds while others are more unique. Moreover, it’s important to note that individual cats within these breeds still might trigger allergies, as each cat will have slightly different allergens.

The Balinese is nearly identical to the Siamese cat breed in most regards, except for its long coat and full plume tail. Physical Characteristics: Curved body; high cheekbones; large ears

Its wavy coat doesnt tend to shed much, which minimizes the spread of dander and other allergens in your home. Physical Characteristics: Large ears; slender neck; prominent eyes The Javanese resulted from a cross with a Balinese and colorpoint shorthair, creating a Siamese-like cat with long hair and a wider coat color range.

Thus, they spread fewer allergens, which might work for people with mild cat allergies. Physical Characteristics: Long legs; athletic build; large ears; almond-shaped, blue eyes The Oriental is a cross of several cat breeds, including the American shorthair, Abyssinian, and Siamese.

These athletic, playful, and intelligent cats are moderate shedders that require brushing a couple of times a week. Rubbing them with a damp cloth also can help to remove dead hair and dander to minimize allergens. Physical Characteristics: Sleek body; angular head; large ears; almond-shaped eyes

In fact, these quiet and gentle cats often love sitting with their favorite humans to be brushed. Brushing at least a couple of times a week is ideal to remove dead hair and tangles as well as to limit its ability to spread allergens. Physical Characteristics: Loosely curled coat; round head; heavy-boned body

The popular Siamese is also supposed to be a low-allergen cat breed, though there is no definitive scientific evidence to that point. These curious cats sport a low-maintenance coat that doesnt shed much and only needs weekly brushing. Although Sphynx cats are commonly described as “hairless,” they do have a fine, downy fuzz that feels almost suede-like when stroked.

High-shedding cat breeds tend to be worse for people with allergies because the allergens get trapped in their coats and spread wherever they lose their fur. Some of these high-shedders include the Persian , Maine coon , Norwegian forest cat , Himalayan , Manx , and Cymric .

If youre allergic to cats, youd be forgiven for thinking you couldnt own one. It makes sense, right? Allergies impact your life and encourage avoidance, so how is it that a person whos allergic to cats can still own one?

Owning a hypoallergenic cat doesnt mean you will never react, but it does reduce your chances of being affected by them daily. Developed in the United States as a breed of its own, its a natural spontaneous mutation of the Siamese gene.

Possessing all the charm and beauty of the Siamese, the Balinese (meaning Oriental Ballerina) cat has the added benefit of a uniquely silky, angora-like coat. Highly intelligent, agile, playful and athletic, the Javanese makes a beautiful family pet. The pixie of the cat fancy Devon Rex sports oversized ears and an elfin face with large impish eyes.

The Cornish Rex have soft, wavy, rippled coats that lack guard hair, therefore they dont shed like other cats. Slender and athletic with curved contours, an arched back and super soft hair, the Cornish Rex is a fine cat youll instantly fall in love with. The first hairless cat to bred specifically for that trait, its features are unique in that it lacks a fur coat.

The sparkling, silvery coat and brilliant green eyes of the Russian Blue draw immediate attention. The Russian Blue naturally occurred in Russia, and as a result its fur has adapted to withstand the harsh climate. Clean your home regularly, being sure to vacuum every few days Keep the air fresh by leaving windows open Keep your cat healthy.

Are There Hypoallergenic Cats?

Some feline breeds exist that are considered low allergy or hypoallergenic cats. This is because they produce fewer allergens than others. Cats do produce pet dander, a common allergen, but the culprit for the estimated 10 percent of the population who are allergic to cats may be a protein, Fel d 1, that is present in cat saliva.Technically, there are no 100 percent hypoallergenic domestic cats or cats that are completely non-allergenic. All cats produce some amount of dander, so you won’t find a dander or allergy-free cat. However, there are breeds that produce less of it and therefore make good cats for people with allergies. The following list of “hypoallergeniccats is a guideline which petMD recommends for people who want to adopt a feline, yet feel options are limited due to allergies:

What causes allergies to cats?

Ever wondered what causes the allergies you suffer from? It’s not the cat’s fur, it’s actually a protein called Fel D1 found in cat saliva that causes you to sneeze and feel itchy. Once a cat licks their coat, the allergen-laden saliva dries and becomes airborne, increasing likelihood for a response.Some breeds produce less of this protein than others, making them ideal cats for people with allergies. In addition to the Fel D1 protein, there are other factors that influence a cat’s allergen production:

Balinese

Often referred to as the “longhaired Siamese,” the Balinese looks like an unlikely candidate for a hypoallergenic cat breed. But it is one of the few breeds that produce less of the Fel D1 protein than other cats, thus causing fewer allergic reactions in allergy sufferers.Balinese cats are smart, sweet, and fun to be around. Like the Siamese, they are known for their ability to communicate vocally. Highly social, Balinese are sensitive to your mood and are more than willing to cheer you up with some happy chatter if you’re feeling gloomy.

Oriental Shorthair

They are considered non-allergenic cats, but it’s still a good practice to groom your Oriental frequently to keep dander to a minimum.The personality of the Oriental is as distinctive as their coat. They are natural entertainers, full of enthusiasm, and love being the center of attention. Conceited one minute— animated and inquisitive the next. They are highly curious and will go to great lengths to be involved in your activities.

Javanese

Like the Balinese, the Javanese sports a medium-long single coat that doesn’t mat. Because of the lack of undercoat, they have less fur, which translates into fewer allergens.Javanese cats are devoted, intelligent and known for their communication skills. They have a fascination with food and tend to burn off extra calories in playful antics. This breed is perfect if you want a responsive cat that’s easy to train and likes showing affection by purring in your ear and following you around.

Devon Rex

Of the two Rex cats, the Devon has both shorter fur and less fur. Your Devon Rex will need to have her paw pads and ears cleaned of oil build-up frequently, but doesn’t need frequent full baths like the Sphynx or Cornish Rex.Devons have been compared to elves and space aliens for their jumbo satellite-dish ears, large, mischievous ‘window-to-the-soul’ eyes, and ethereal appearance. They’ve been known to cuddle up with you at night and wake you in the morning with kisses and purrs of affection. And since the Devon sheds less than other breeds, you can snuggle back without fear of covering yourself in cat hair.

Cornish Rex

The Cornish Rex requires more upkeep than the Devon because they require frequent baths to mitigate the oil buildup on their skin.Cornish Rexes are active, inquisitive, gazelle-like felines that have a playful temperament. Everything is a game to the Cornish Rex, and they can be hard to ignore when they’re in a sociable mood, which is most of the time. Rexes are determinedly outgoing and loving towards their favorite humans. With their warm suede feel, they make the perfect winter lap warmer, too.Both the Devon and Cornish Rex can be the best cats for allergies, choose one that matches your personality.

Sphynx

The hairless Sphynx is the cat most often associated with being a hypoallergenic cat breed. Being hairless does not mean they’re maintenance-free, however. Your Sphynx will need frequent baths to remove the gummy buildup of oils on her skin, and their large ears will also require frequent cleanings.According to the French breed standard, the Sphynx personality traits are often compared to dogs children based on its animated nature. To say Sphynxes are lively is an understatement; they’ll keep you entertained performing aerialist feats from the top of doorways and bookshelves.Very devoted and loyal, they follow their humans around, wagging their tails doggy fashion and purring with affection.

Siberian

Like the Balinese, the Siberian sports a moderately long coat, but still is hypoallergenic due to the lower-than-average enzyme levels in their saliva. Some claim that 75 percent of cat allergy sufferers have no reaction to the Siberian.Siberians are affectionate cats with a good dose of personality and playfulness. They are open to handling, and have a fascination with water, often dropping toys into their water dishes or splashing in bathtubs before they’re dry.Siberians are intelligent, with the ability to problem-solve to get what they want. Despite their size, they are very agile and are great jumpers, able to leap tall bookcases in a single bound.

Tip

Most people who have cat allergies aren’t allergic to a cat’s fur but rather the proteins in its saliva, urine, and dander (skin flakes). Consistently cleaning the areas of your home where your cat spends a lot of time can help reduce some of these allergens.

Balinese

Often referred to as the “longhaired Siamese”, the Balinese looks like an unlikely candidate for a hypoallergenic cat. Developed in the United States as a breed of its own, it’s a natural spontaneous mutation of the Siamese gene. Possessing all the charm and beauty of the Siamese, the Balinese (meaning “Oriental Ballerina) cat has the added benefit of a uniquely silky, angora-like coat.

Javanese

Highly intelligent, agile, playful and athletic, the Javanese makes a beautiful family pet. Another longhaired variety of the Siamese, the breed was developed from a foundation of Siamese, Colourpoint and Balinese cats and is extremely fond of people. They like to be “helpful” and follow you around wherever you go and will likely sneak into your bed at every opportunity (not a good idea for someone with allergies). While not as loud as the Siamese, the Javanese is still just as opinionated and will tell you exactly what he thinks.

Devon Rex

The “pixie of the cat fancy” Devon Rex sports oversized ears and an elfin face with large impish eyes. This adorable combination only hints at the mad-cap personality within – fun-loving, relaxed, social and a little devilish. Intensely loyal, the Devon Rex possesses almost dog-like qualities and will want to be with you whenever possible.

Cornish Rex

The Cornish Rex have soft, wavy, rippled coats that lack guard hair, therefore they don’t shed like other cats. Requiring very little grooming, they won’t deposit hair around the home. Slender and athletic with curved contours, an arched back and super soft hair, the Cornish Rex is a fine cat you’ll instantly fall in love with. To find out more about this gorgeous feline, visit our cat breed centre https://www.petsecure.com.au/cat-breeds/cornish-rex/

Siberian

The muscular, powerful Siberian is extremely agile and can leap great distances and heights. An intelligent breed, it’s known to problem solve to get what it wants and will get along with children, other cats and cat-friendly dogs. The Siberian cat is thought to produce some of the lowest levels of Fel D1. To find out more about this amazing beauty visit https://www.petsecure.com.au/cat-breeds/siberian-cat/

Sphynx

The Sphynx has long been a ‘go to’ cat for people with allergies, however it’s not strictly “hypoallergenic”. The first hairless cat to bred specifically for that trait, its features are unique in that it lacks a fur coat. Extremely warm to touch, they have earned the nickname “suede hot water bottle”. While grooming is not a problem, they do require sponging down regularly to remove oily secretions. To find out more about this unusual cat which we dont see around very often, visit https://www.petsecure.com.au/cat-breeds/sphynx-cat/