What Can I Use Instead of Straw for Cat Shelter?

Furthermore, where can I buy straw for a feral cat shelter? Straw is the best insulated bedding for cat shelters. Bales of straw are plentiful at this time of year in garden centers and home improvement stores, such as Home Depot and Lowe’s. Even local supermarkets have bales of straw alongside the chrysanthemums!

Cut a small hole in the end of the box, feed a waterproof outdoor electrical cord through, and place a heating pad between the carpet square and blanket. Feral cats do not meow at humans as a form of communication (though some may develop this habit if they’re successfully tamed and domesticated.)

What bedding is best for outdoor cats?

Straw, the dry leftover stalks from harvested crops, repels moisture, making it the best bedding for outdoor cat shelters. Loosely pack the straw in the shelter to the quarter or halfway point.

What should I put in my feral cat house?

Putting a cover, or flap, over the doorway of your shelter will help keep cold air out and warm air in. A piece of heavy vinyl or rubber, like a car’s floor mat, will work. The material has to be thick enough to provide some insulation but light enough for the cats to easily pull or push it open.

Should I use hay or straw in a cat shelter?

Straw— Not Hay —for Outdoor Cat Shelters. They look similar, but while straw makes excellent bedding for outdoor cat shelters, hay becomes a soggy mess. Hay is typically used to feed animals, like horses. It soaks up moisture, making it cold and uncomfortable for cats—and has the potential to get moldy.

No matter the time of the year, feral and stray cats can struggle with finding a warm place to crash for the night and unfortunately there are just too many of them for all of them to find safe, warm forever homes.

If youre up for a more serious carpentry project, this A-frame made from recycled pallets will keep feral cats safe from the elements while looking great in your yard. (Noteyoull have to add insulation to make this shelter suitable for outdoor cats in the winter.)

Loaded up with straw for insulation, this shelter will ensure cozy days and nights for your neighborhood feral cats. Halfway between a premade and DIY solution, plywood and straw turn this sturdy doghouse into the perfect winter shelter for feral cats. Instead of tossing the cooler in the basement once beach season is over, why not convert it into a winter home for feral cats?

The KatKabin is a sturdy, waterproof structure with an insulated floor, best for locations with more mild winters.

Cold, wet, wintry weather is just around the corner. So now is the time to purchase or construct outdoor cat shelters for your feral colony cats if you dont have them in place already. Its also the perfect time of year to replace the straw in the cat shelters you already use. Read on for information from the New York City Feral Cat Initiative on where to buy ready-made shelters and bales of straw to keep your feral cats warm this winter.

To locate the nearest retail store that carries bales of straw, do a Google search for garden centers near you, then call them to ask. Note: Bear in mind that stores sometimes refer to it as hay when its actually straw. Straw, used as bedding for livestock, is the hollow, dried stems of harvested grain; it is shiny and yellow.

DIY Shelters: You can make a simple cat shelter using Styrofoam coolers. Coolers need to be big enough for a cat to stand up and turn around inside (larger if more than one cat will be using it). A nice cooler can be purchased on Amazon for under $30 and will last for years if properly cared for. You can also make a simple shelter out of an 18 gallon plastic storage tote that are available at home improvement stores.

Straw, the dry leftover stalks from harvested crops, repels moisture, making it the best bedding for outdoor cat shelters. Loosely pack the straw in the shelter to the quarter or halfway point.

Straw is not hard to come by and can be bought at pet/farm supply stores, garden centers, and your local farm. Keep enough straw to freshen the shelter when the seasons change, or as needed. Straw can last decades when stored properly – in a dry place and off the ground, such as a wood pallet.

If you live in an area that has extreme winter temperatures, consider installing a kitty door in a garage, barn, or storage building to allow your cats an escape from the extreme temperatures and preciptation. Feeding your cats year-round on a regular schedule will keep them healthy, strong and less prone to wander off looking for a meal. If theres always food left after 30 minutes, you might be giving them too much If possible, build a simple elevated feeding area for your cats.

It will help keep other critters out of their food Dont leave uneaten food out for more than 30 minutes – it attracts bugs and other animals Keep the feeding area clean and in one maintained location Dont worry if some cats eat before others. Felines with seniority in the cat community may eat before others who are lower on the social scale Before starting your car, give a firm tap on the hood and check between the tires – sometimes kitties crawl into the engine or hide under the car for warmth Antifreeze is deadly to cats – keep it out of reach and clean up spills Dont use salts or chemicals to melt snow – they can hurt cats paws and some are toxic Don’t use rat poisoning or similar items on your property.

This includes changes in behavior, eating habits, dull eyes or coats, discharge from noses or eyes, weight loss, fur loss, changes in their gait, and listlessness.

10 Awesome Outdoor Cat House Ideas

No matter the time of the year, feral and stray cats can struggle with finding a warm place to crash for the night — and unfortunately there are just too many of them for all of them to find safe, warm forever homes.While spaying, neutering, and cat adoption are critical to solving the problem of feral cats long term, many cat lovers take the extra step of buying or building outdoor shelters for the feral cats in their neighborhood — especially during wintertime.Check out these outdoor shelter ideas for feral cats, and get inspired to make a homeless cat’s life more comfortable and safe.

2. Insulated, straw-lined DIY feral cat shelter

For very cold conditions, Neighborhood Cats has a DIY guide to create an ultra-warm shelter out of Styrofoam and linoleum tiles. Latex deck paint makes it cheerful-looking while sealing out the elements. See how to make one.

3. Ultra-deluxe heated cat House

Not the DIY type? You can still help feral cats stay warm with this outdoor heated cat house from Cozy Winters. Two exits help make sure cats won’t get trapped by predators. Check it out.

4. Cat mansion made from wood pallets

Give feral cats an outdoor shelter—in style! If you’re up for a more serious carpentry project, this A-frame made from recycled pallets will keep feral cats safe from the elements while looking great in your yard. (Note—you’ll have to add insulation to make this shelter suitable for outdoor cats in the winter.) See how on Pinterest.

5. Super-cozy, super-easy DIY cat shelter

A jumbo-sized clear plastic bin is the foundation for this winter cat shelter. Loaded up with straw for insulation, this shelter will ensure cozy days and nights for your neighborhood feral cats. See how it’s done.

6. Converted doghouse

Halfway between a premade and DIY solution, plywood and straw turn this sturdy doghouse into the perfect winter shelter for feral cats. Take a look.

7. Best-ever use for your picnic cooler

Instead of tossing the cooler in the basement once beach season is over, why not convert it into a winter home for feral cats? (Hint: cat shelter experts suggest using straw instead of blankets for extra warmth and water-resistance.) Get step-by-step instructions.

8. Adorable outdoor cat hotel

Why not get a winter cat shelter that’s as cute as the cats inside it? The KatKabin is a sturdy, waterproof structure with an insulated floor, best for locations with more mild winters. Check it out.

9. Ultra-simple Styrofoam cat shelter

All you need is a Styrofoam cooler, a box cutter, some straw, and a few boards to create this simple, effective feral cat shelter. Ask a local restaurant or medical office to donate a heavy-duty Styrofoam coolers—they usually end up in the trash, anyway. Read all the tips for making it work.