What Can I Give My Cat for Pain?

If you are searching for something that you can give your cat for pain, dont look to your medicine cabinet or your dogs medications for answerswhat you find there can be toxic to cats.

Veterinarians will occasionally prescribe the forms of NSAIDs that are formulated for people, such as aspirin and ibuprofen , for specific conditions, but you should never give them to your cat for pain relief without veterinary guidance. There are also NSAIDs made specifically for cats, but even these products needs to be used with extreme caution (if at all) and always under the close supervision of a veterinarian.

Research has suggested that this is because cats lack certain enzymes that help metabolize and eliminate certain drugs. As little as one tablet of Regular Strength Tylenol contains enough acetaminophen to kill some cats. The drugs metabolites (breakdown products) destroy liver cells, damage the kidneys and convert hemoglobinthe oxygen-carrying molecule in bloodto methemoglobin, which results in poor oxygen delivery throughout the body and tissue damage.

Chronic pain associated with inflammation, like that caused by degenerative joint disease (also called osteoarthritis or simply arthritis), tends to respond best to multimodal therapy (taking several approaches at once), which often may not include traditional pain medications . These guidelines explain that NSAIDs are an important class of medication in feline medicine, and that its worth looking into whether they can be used safely in cats in long-term treatment protocols. Giving them food that has a reduced caloric density with normal amounts of protein will help them lose weight while still allowing them to retain muscle mass and strength.

Excess body weight not only puts undue stress on arthritic joints, but it also promotes the inflammation that is at the heart of the disease.

Which human painkiller is safe for cats?

As little as one tablet of Regular Strength Tylenol contains enough acetaminophen to kill some cats.

What is good to give a cat for pain?

NSAIDs for Cats. NSAIDS are usually the first line of defense. The FDA hasn’t approved any NSAIDs for long-term pain management, but certain ones are cleared for short-term use in cats. Your vet may prescribe the pill robenacoxib, which is also available as an injection.

How can I calm my cats pain?

Clean minor wounds with warm water and dry them with a clean kitchen towel or a wad of soft paper towels. ….Deep injuries may improve with soaking or hot compresses. ….Only apply topical creams and salves with a recommendation from your vet.

Can I give my cat aspirin?

Aspirin in high doses gives a cat hepatitis, gastric irritation, and respiratory problems. Basically, giving a cat aspirin is very risky. But paracetamol is worse, because cats can’t get rid of it. You should never ever give a cat any paracetamol.

Theres few things worse than seeing our babies in pain and when a pet is in pain, they cant exactly explain what is wrong or where it hurts. But regardless of the causes or symptoms, we just want to make them feel better. So what can you give a cat for pain? Of course, the obvious solution would be to try what works with us but the pain relievers humans take can be deadly for pets.

If your cat has taken paracetamol, you should phone your nearest emergency veterinarian immediately for advice. Also: Multiple products have been shown to contain impurities, which may be toxic to your cat, warns Dr. Burch.

They will likely give a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID), or an opioid, both of which are commonly used for feline pain, explains Dr. Woodnutt. Supplements, for example fatty acids, may also help with inflammation, which is another resource a vet may recommend to deal with pain. Heat therapy utilizes the same strategy as with humans, warming up problem areas to help relieve pain.

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Its one of the most helpless feelings a pet owner can experience: Fluffy or Fido is in pain, and you dont know how to make it better. Maybe they stepped on a piece of broken glass and cut their paw. Or, they ate something that didnt agree with their stomach and are now lying in a ball whimpering. Or maybe theyre having an unexpected flare-up of arthritis. Whatever the case may be, they are hurting, the veterinarians office is closed for the night, and you just want to alleviate their pain.

Advil (ibuprofen) and Tylenol (acetaminophen) should never be used in your pet, says Kristi C. Torres, Pharm.D., a pharmacist in Austin, Texas, and a member of SingleCares Medical Review Board. While acetaminophen is toxic to both dogs and cats, felines are especially prone to poisoning death, according to the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) , because they lack an enzyme to properly break it down in the liver.

Gabapentin , for instance, is an anticonvulsant and nerve medicine used to control seizures and alleviate pain associated with shingles in humans. According to Dr. Torres, gabapentin can be given as the oral capsule available for human use, but if your pet requires the liquid version, theyll have to prescribe a formulation especially for animals. Prescription medications arent the only option for pain relief in your petthere are a handful of natural remedies that may be worth trying.

First of all, make sure that your cat doesn’t fall into the list of life threatening emergencies. If they do, run, don’t walk, to the nearest vet, regardless of your financial situation. At the very least, most vets will put your cat out of their misery rather than letting them die in agony if you cannot afford care. Even the emergency clinic will do a no charge euthanasia if your cat is suffering, and you cannot afford treatment. If you just can‘t get to All Feline, either because of location or weather, or because we are full, ask us for a referral to a closer vet, or call a friend, neighbor, or taxi for a ride to get your cat to the vet.

If your cat‘s health issue is not immediately life threatening, depending on what the issue is, you may be able to help them until you can get them to a vet.If you have internet access (which I am guessing you do if you are reading this), there are two options for questions and answers, or even live chats with veterinarians online. For non-life threatening issues, here are a few things that you can do.Keep in mind though, you are not a vet, you do not necessarily know if what your cat has is a major medical issue or a minor one, and we strongly suggest that you bring your cat in to be seen by a veterinarian at the earliest opportunity.

Pain.Whether this from trauma, illness, disease, or for whatever reason, there is not much you can do at home for pain control.The only thing you can give your cat is of a children’s (81mg) aspirin once every other day.Do not exceed this dose unless under the advice of a veterinarian, and do not continue for longer than a week or you may end up with bleeding issues.Do not give this any more often.Cats metabolize aspirin very differently than people or dogs, and it take them 48 hours to metabolize one little half of a low dose aspirin.NEVER EVER give your cat Tylenol or Ibuprofen.Tylenol is a caticide.It will shut down your cat‘s liver, and be a very painful way to die.Ibuprofen will cause acute kidney failure, and unless we can treat it immediately, your cat could die.We have much better, safer pain medications at the veterinary clinic.Bring your cat in if they are in pain. Upset stomach.Whether your cat has vomiting, diarrhea, or just plain is nauseous and doesn’t want to eat, there are a lot of different causes for this.If your cat hasn’t been seen by a veterinarian for this, then they should be.For short term, to try and help reduce the nausea, you can give a 1/4 th of a tablet of Pepcid AC once or twice daily.You need to make sure that this is just the plain 10mg Pepcid AC or its generic equivalent, famotidine.Do not give Pepcid AC Complete or Maximum Strength Pepcid AC.DO NOT give Pepto Bismol, because this has salicylates in it and cats have a hard time metabolizing it, just like aspirin.Again, we have much more effective medications at the veterinary clinic, and the first thing is to figure out the cause of the nausea so that we can make your cat feel better. Wound care.Please don’t use hydrogen peroxide.This is an antiseptic with way too much credit.It is very damaging to the tissue it is used on, and could even be absorbed into the bloodstream and cause a fatal embolism.Don’t use it.Instead, use a diluted gentle soap and warm water, alcohol (although this will sting like crazy and you might get bit), or if you have it, betadine or chlorhexadine solutions would be ideal.Be very gentle when cleaning out the wound.It hurts, and you don’t want to cause even more damage.If it is a large wound and you can see muscle, bone, or worse, or if there is pus draining from it, then you need to bring your cat into the veterinary clinic as soon as possible.

NSAID Use in Cats

Cats are extremely sensitive to the side effects of NSAIDs. Veterinarians will occasionally prescribe the forms of NSAIDs that are formulated for people, such as aspirin and ibuprofen, for specific conditions, but you should never give them to your cat for pain relief without veterinary guidance.There are also NSAIDs made specifically for cats, but even these products needs to be used with extreme caution (if at all) and always under the close supervision of a veterinarian.

What About Tylenol for Cats?

Cats are roughly two to five times more sensitive to NSAIDs than are dogs.They are also not able to eliminate NSAIDs from their system as efficiently as dogs and humans. Research has suggested that this is because cats lack certain enzymes that help metabolize and eliminate certain drugs.Cats are therefore at increased risk for adverse drug reactions, such as:

What

Pain medications for cats should only be given to cats under close veterinary supervision.Acute (short-term) pain is often treated with a prescription opioid pain reliever called buprenorphine, but this medication can be costly over the long run.Chronic pain associated with inflammation, like that caused by degenerative joint disease (also called osteoarthritis or simply arthritis), tends to respond best to multimodal therapy (taking several approaches at once), which often may not include traditional pain medications.

Are human drugs safe for pets?

Unfortunately, many of the common over-the-counter pain relievers for humans are dangerous for dogs and cats. “Advil (ibuprofen) and Tylenol (acetaminophen) should never be used in your pet,” says Kristi C. Torres, Pharm.D., a pharmacist in Austin, Texas, and a member of SingleCare’s Medical Review Board.While acetaminophen is toxic to both dogs and cats, felines are especially prone to poisoning death, according to the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), because they lack an enzyme to properly break it down in the liver.Meanwhile, aspirin as a pet pain med is less dangerous, but Dr. Torres says it’s best not to risk it.“Some vets may say that using a coated, buffered aspirin would be acceptable in an emergency situation, but it will likely make your animal’s stomach very upset and possibly cause a stomach bleed,” she explains.Even if a human drug seems “safe” for a pet (for instance, Benadryl is typically okay for both human and pet consumption), the dosing will likely be very different for your furry friend. “It’s important to recognize that an animal dose of any drug is not simply a percentage of a weight-based dose in humans,” says Jeffrey Fudin, Pharm.D., the managing editor of paindr.com.“For example, if the dose of a drug is 75 mg in a 150 pound human, that does not mean that the dose is 37.5 mg in a 75 pound dog. Dogs and cats metabolize drugs very differently from each other and from humans,” Dr. Fudin explains. “What’s acceptable in one animal could be dangerous or even fatal in another. It is always best to seek advice from a veterinarian before giving any medication to your pet.”

Prescription pain relief for dogs and cats

While there are a number of OTC human medications you should never give your pet, your vet may prescribe a pain med for your pet that’s commonly prescribed for humans—albeit at a different dosage and a potentially different formulation. If it’s available at your local pharmacy, you can use your SingleCare card to save.

1. Gabapentin

According to Dr. Torres, gabapentin can be given as the oral capsule available for human use, but if your pet requires the liquid version, they’ll have to prescribe a formulation especially for animals. “The human liquid formulation contains xylitol, which would be toxic to your pet,” she says.

3. Rx-only NSAIDs

Though OTC NSAIDs are off-limits for your pets, there are a handful of Rx-only NSAIDs that can be prescribed by a vet. For the most part, each species has their own unique prescription nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory medication, but there are a few canine and feline prescription options that are also used in humans (etodolac, celecoxib, meloxicam). Prednisone, an Rx steroid medication used in humans, can also sometimes help pet pain.