What Can Chinchillas Eat?

It’s crucial to always give your pet chinchilla the right things to eat. This includes grass hay, chinchilla pellets, and fresh fruits and vegetables in moderation. Chinchillas in the wild eat a few things that pet chinchillas don’t get. Clean water is also important.

In moderation, fresh vegetables and fruits can be healthful and occasional chinchilla treats — though no more than 10 percent of his diet. If your chinchilla is unwell for any reason, don’t feed fruit or other foods that have significant sugar content.

Chinchillas who wander on their own eat a lot of bark, foliage, seeds, cactus fruit, flowers and many varieties of grasses.

What human food can chinchillas eat?

Some suitable veggie options for chinchillas are carrots, kale, parsley, dandelion greens, lettuce, collard greens and turnip greens. Fruit choices include strawberries, pears, bananas and apples. Always chop vegetables and fruits up into very small bites.

What snacks can I give my chinchilla?

Dried rose hips. ….Dried Herbs (dandelion roots or leaves, rosemary, hibiscus, parsley, strawberry, and blackberry leaves). ….Dried fruit (apple, banana, and papaya). ….Raisins and dried cranberries. ….Fresh fruit (apple, strawberry, or pear).

What fresh vegetables can chinchillas eat?

Carrot..Kale..Alfalfa..Celery..Potato..Sweet potatoes..Squash.

What foods are poisonous to chinchillas?

There are a number of foods that are poisonous to chinchillas so always double check before you feed them. DO NOT FEED your chinchilla with the following: asparagus, avocado, peas, cabbage, corn, lettuce, broccoli, spinach, rhubarb and rhubarb leaves. Other dangerous foods are banana, sunflower seeds and peanuts.

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Chinchillas are herbivores they eat a lot of plants and grasses. Their diet should be high in fibre and protein and low in fat and moisture.

It should consist of approximately 35% carbohydrates, 15% protein, 30% fibre, 4% sugar and no more than 3.5% fat. In their natural environment, chinchillas chew the bark off trees. If your pet chinchilla has a lack of fibre in their diet, its teeth could become overgrown, which could then lead to fur chewing.

Chinchillas eat different types of vegetation but plants that are too lush might upset their tummies, so quantities need to be carefully regulated. Chinchillas digestive systems need hay and grass to stay healthy. Leafy greens should be part of chinchillas‘ core diet.

Chinchillas need around a tea spoon a day of fresh greens. Exotic pet sources are not unanimous on the matter, but rabbits and chinchillas have different dietary requirements, so it is best to avoid giving chinchillas rabbit food pellets. A number of brands sell chinchilla food pellets

Feed around two table spoons of pellets a day, preferably one in the morning and one at night as chinchillas tend to be most active around midnight and at dawn. Small amounts of dried fruit and root vegetables, such as raisins, sultanas and carrots. Some sources recommend nuts and seeds as treats but you must bear in mind the high fat content in those.

Chinchillas have sensitive stomachs, so dont give too much fruit and veg as they can cause diarrhoea. Cabbage Corn Banana Nuts Sunflower seeds Lettuce Asparagus Avocado Rhubarb Rhubarb leaves Peas Broccoli Spinach Make sure theyre eating and drinking every day and passing dry droppings.

Chinchillas‘ teeth grow continuously throughout their life needing wearing down and keeping at the correct length/shape by eating grass/ hay/grass-based chinchilla pellets. Not eating the right diet can result in serious dental disease.

Only give your chinchillas small amounts of dried fruit and root vegetables as treats.

Chinchillas are adorable. They are playful, cute, entertaining, and full of energy – and they love to beg for treats. They are hard to resist when it comes to begging and believe me, they are masters at it! While they definitely deserve a treat, its hard to know what are safe treats for chinchillas. Weve got some recommendations for you.

However, remember that their digestive systems are extremely sensitive and cannot handle the fats, sweets, and oils in some foods. Too many of these treats can cause health issues such as diarrhea, seizures, gastrointestinal impactions, tooth decay, malocclusion, pancreatitis, liver disease, and bloating, leading to death.

He was lethargic, didnt appear to be eating or drinking, had evidence of teeth issues, and very few cecals (poops) in his house. He had been fed a diet of seed stick treats, yogurt drops, and other junk food sold for chinchillas in pet stores. Any food containing dairy animal ingredients such as milk, cheese, ice cream, etc., is dangerous for a chinchilla.

Seeds and nuts are incredibly high in fat, protein, and oils, leading to a calcium deficiency and possibly liver damage. Now youve got a list of healthy chinchilla treats so you can safely reward your chin for being your best friend.

Basic Chinchilla Diet

When it comes to a well-balanced chinchilla meal plan, two things are very important: grass hay and chinchilla pellets. When looking for roughage, a couple of healthful choices are orchard grass, oat, alpine and alfalfa. Chinchillas also should have constant access to Timothy hay. Commercial chinchilla pellet mixes are available at many pet supply stores. Always feed pellets that are made specifically for chinchillas and not for any animals, even other types of rodents. Feed only one to two tablespoons of pellets daily.

Fresh Vegetables and Fruits

In moderation, fresh vegetables and fruits can be healthful and occasional chinchilla treats — though no more than 10 percent of his diet. Consider giving treats between two and four times weekly, for example. Some suitable veggie options for chinchillas are carrots, kale, parsley, dandelion greens, lettuce, collard greens and turnip greens. Fruit choices include strawberries, pears, bananas and apples. Always chop vegetables and fruits up into very small bites. Don’t let them stay in your chinchilla’s cage when they’re no longer fresh. If your chinchilla is unwell for any reason, don’t feed fruit or other foods that have significant sugar content.

Water

Water is very important for your chinchilla. Always make sure he has plenty of fresh and clean water right in front of him. Choose purified or filtered water that contains no chlorine. Refresh his drinking supply at least once a day.

What do you feed a pet chinchilla?

Chinchillas are herbivores – they eat a lot of plants and grasses.Their diet should be high in fibre and protein and low in fat and moisture. It should consist of approximately 35% carbohydrates, 15% protein, 30% fibre, 4% sugar and no more than 3.5% fat.In their natural environment, chinchillas chew the bark off trees. If your pet chinchilla has a lack of fibre in their diet, its teeth could become overgrown, which could then lead to fur chewing. A diet low in fibre will also disrupt their digestion.Too much fat in a chinchilla’s diet could cause liver damage.Chinchilla’s eat different types of vegetation but plants that are too lush might upset their tummies, so quantities need to be carefully regulated.A constant supply of hay is highly recommended. Hay makes up most of their diet. Chinchillas’ digestive systems need hay and grass to stay healthy.Chinchilla’s can become very ill without water, so they need constant access to clean drinking water. To keep the water clean, use a drinking bottle.
In this article: What fruit and vegetables can chinchillas eat? | Can chinchillas eat rabbit food? | Can you buy chinchilla food? | What treats do chinchillas like? | Foods that chinchillas can’t eat | Chinchilla diet dos and donts

Can you buy chinchilla food?

The following vegetables can up make the majority of a chinchillas’ core diet:Chinchillas need around a tea spoon a day of fresh greens.Fruits are only to be given as treats as they are high in sugars. Chinchillas can eat small amounts of fruit such as:

What treats do chinchillas like?

Small amounts of dried fruit and root vegetables, such as raisins, sultanas and carrots.Some sources recommend nuts and seeds as treats but you must bear in mind the high fat content in those. Chinchillas can get seriously ill if they are fed fatty foods so avoid giving nuts and seeds and other foods high in fat.Control the amount of treats you give as they can be high in sugars and making too much of those available to your chinchilla might make it overweight, which can lead to illness.Chinchillas have sensitive stomachs, so don’t give too much fruit and veg as they can cause diarrhoea.Treats are normally higher in sugar and fat; too many can cause liver damage and weight gain, so don’t overfeed with treats.

The Chinchilla Diet

Chinchillas are herbivores. Therefore, their natural diet in the wild includes mostly roots, grass, and plants, but not fats and sugars. If you have a pet chinchilla, the most important things you can provide are good quality grass hay (Timothy hay), pellets explicitly formulated for chinchillas, and fresh water every day.Usually, however, people who have chinchillas don’t just give them hay, water, and pellets. Chinchillas love to beg for treats, and most really enjoy sweets. However, remember that their digestive systems are extremely sensitive and cannot handle the fats, sweets, and oils in some foods. Also, most commercial chinchilla “treats” sold in stores should be avoided. Seed stick treats and “yogurt” drops, and grains are very high in fats and sugars. Too many of these treats can cause health issues such as diarrhea, seizures, gastrointestinal impactions, tooth decay, malocclusion, pancreatitis, liver disease, and bloating, leading to death.As an example, I’d like to share Zyphr’s story. Zyphr was an eight-year-old chinchilla surrendered to an area animal shelter. I happened to see him when I went to visit the shelter and was immediately concerned because he didn’t look well. He was lethargic, didn’t appear to be eating or drinking, had evidence of teeth issues, and very few cecals (poops) in his house. The shelter told me he would be available for release in a few days. I returned to get Zyphr and took him to my exotic veterinarian immediately. Under anesthesia, my vet removed six spurs on his molars, cutting into his cheeks and tongue. We hoped he would resume eating once the spurs were removed, but sadly, he did not.Upon examining the food and treats that his former human caretakers sent with him, we realized he most likely was suffering from bloat. He had been fed a diet of seed stick treats, yogurt drops, and other “junk food” sold for chinchillas in pet stores. His poor diet, including non-healthy chinchilla treats led to molar spurs. The molar spurs prevented him from eating hay, which is essential to keep the digestive system healthy. He passed away in my arms the following day.