What Are Cats Tails Made Of?

Nothing is quite as wonderful as walking into your home at the end of a long day and being greeted by your cats, cooing their happiness, their tails held high as if to say, Welcome back! We missed you so much! But your cats tail does much more than help you understand how shes feeling. Read on for some cool facts about the cat tail and what it does.

Is a cat's tail made of bone?

The tail is an important part of the feline anatomy and is actually an extension of the spine. The bones of the tail (vertebrae) are bigger at the base and get smaller toward the tip. Soft discs cushion the spaces between the vertebrae and allow flexibility. The tail muscle and nerves facilitate tail movement.

Do cats feel pain in their tails?

She’ll probably be in pain and may snap or growl if you touch her hind quarters, so you’ll need to be extraordinarily gentle. Vertebrae dislocations can often heal on their own, but if a severe breakage occurs, your veterinarian might have to amputate her tail.

Does pulling a cat's tail hurt them?

Pulling on a cat’s tail could actually paralyze your cat. … A well-intentioned grab could cause a world of misery for your cat, so leave your kitty’s tail be. If your cat does get its tail hurt, take a visit to a local veterinary hospital for help.

What happens when a cat breaks its tail?

For most fractured tails, the tail will heal naturally, but over time. This implies that it was a clean break that did not affect any nerves or blood vessels. In these cases, the vet will simply make sure it is healing properly and provide your cat with pain relievers to help ease the pain.

If your cats tail is hanging down, it might sign that its broken or injured. Find out how long a broken tail takes to heal and whats involved with treating it.

In all cases, the nerves and blood vessels in the area are often damaged, Aimee Simpson, DVM , medical director of VCA Cat Hospital of Philadelphia , says. But there may be additional signs since some of the nerves at the base of the tail also control the hind legs, bladder, and bowel, explain the experts at Mar Vista Animal Medical Center in Los Angeles, California.

If nerves that control the function of the bladder or bowel have been injured, your kitty may require more help. This involves gently squeezing the bladder to push urine outyour veterinarian can demonstrate how to safely do this and may also prescribe medication to help.

1. Your cats tail helps them to balance. The tail helps to serve as a counterbalance when cats walk on narrow spaces such as fences or shelves. The tail also aids in balance when a cat is running after or jumping on prey.

It is a simple fact: cats move their tails. Tail movement is a communication tool in the feline world, so when a cat does not move her tail, it is an indication that something might be wrong.

Wrap the tail in a towel to control bleeding while you transport your cat to the veterinary emergency clinic. Tail pull injuries can cause damage to nerves higher up in the spinal cord that control urination and defecation.

2. It’s a communication aid, too

Cats communicate largely through body language, and the cat tail is one of the most important parts of your cat’s communication toolbox. By understanding “tail talk,” you can understand how your cat is feeling with just a glance.A happy cat, for instance, walks with her tail held high, and a super-happy cat will add a quiver at the tail tip to demonstrate her joy. A mildly annoyed cat will twitch the end of her tail, but if she’s lashing her tail back and forth, you’d better step away, because the claws are about to come out. A cat concentrating on prey will have her tail held low to the ground, although there might be a very slight twitching at the end as she tries to control her excitement.

4. Cats can live without tails

A cat whose tail is amputated because of injury learns to compensate for the loss pretty easily. Manx cats are born without tails, and I’ve never heard any reports of excessive clumsiness in these breeds.

First Aid for Tail Injuries in Cats

It is a simple fact: cats move their tails. Tail movement is a communication tool in the feline world, so when a cat does not move her tail, it is an indication that something might be wrong.The tail is an important part of the feline anatomy and is actually an extension of the spine. The bones of the tail (vertebrae) are bigger at the base and get smaller toward the tip. Soft discs cushion the spaces between the vertebrae and allow flexibility. The tail muscle and nerves facilitate tail movement. This complex tail structure of bone, muscles, nerves, and blood vessels can easily be injured.