What Are Categorical Grants??

Since the New Deal, the national government has played an increasing role in encouraging and even coercing states to administer federal policies. Central to this evolving relationship has been the federal governments use of grants-in-aid to encourage states cooperation in implementing federal policies.

Describe the causes and consequences of increased federal aid to the states in recent years. Block grants are federal grants-in-aid that allow states considerable discretion (within broad limits) about how the funds will be spent.

The federal government places few restrictions, allowing states to spend funds within broad programmatic areas. The Republicans replaced the federal Aid to Families with Dependent Children (AFDC) entitlement welfare program with Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF), which provided block grants to state governments to reform welfare. States are free to tailor program and impose added restrictions on recipients.

With the Taking Back Our Streets Act, the Republicans replaced the specific programs and grants to state and local governments that characterized the Clinton administrations crime bill with block grants to states, allowing them to fight crime as they saw fit. Clinton bill: Violent Crime Control and Law Enforcement Act of 1994. Contract with Americas crime provisions: Taking Back Our Streets Act of 1995.

About $10 billion in block grants to states to meet general crime problems. All political actors engage in instrumental acts designed to further their individual goals.

What's an example of a categorical grant?

Medicaid and the food stamp program are examples of categorical grants. Block grants come with less stringent federal administrative conditions and provide recipients more flexibility over how to spend grant funds. … The federal government uses grants and other tools to achieve its national policy priorities.

What is a categorical grant grant?

Categorical grants are funds the federal government gives to state and local governments to spend on specific activities within specific programs. … Categorical grants contrast with block grants, which can be used for broadly defined purposes and are not subject to as much oversight or as many administrative conditions.

What are 3 examples of categorical grants?

Examples of categorical grant funding include Head Start programs, Magnet School programs, Forestry Assistance programs, and Asbestos Abatement programs.

What are categorical grants and why would they be used?

Categorical grants are federal grants given to state and local governments to encourage their cooperation in implementing specific purposes and programs. These grants give less flexibility to state governments than block grants.

Categorical grants can only be used for a specific purpose, and are given out to state and local governments by federal entities. It is very specific, and can only be used for the one defined objective. Entities are not required to accept these categorical grants, but if they do, they are required to all the rules and regulations that are laid out beforehand. This article with talk more about categorical grants, and give some examples of some.

When Barak Obama was the president, he stressed the importance of getting children ready for their education through Head Start programs. Without them, there simply would not have been enough funding to provide all this support to the Head Start Programs of the country, and children would be worse of for it.

Imagine you are the governor of a state, and you need funding for state projects. How would you like to receive a boatload of money from the federal government? Sounds good, right? Not so quick there’s always a catch!

However, the money is contingent upon local governments meeting the requirements set by the Department of Education. Here, Congress decides how much it wants to spend overall on a project, and then the money is distributed to all states according to a formula.

In this program, states competed for education money by making changes to their educational system, such as adopting the Common Core standards, uncapping the number of charter schools, and making improvements to the lowest-achieving schools. Categorical grants are a major part of American society, even if we don’t always realize it. A controversial categorical grant has been the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, sometimes called Obamacare.

They have, thus, left billions of dollars on the table as an act of protest against the controversial piece of legislation. There are many familiar examples of projects that receive categorical grants, including food stamps, Medicare, and Obamacare.

How a state chooses to design its system of funding schools is ultimately a question of education governance, determining whostate policymakers, school districts, or school principalsgets to make the decisions about how and where funding is spent. States have two primary ways of funding schools: the foundation, or base funding that is intended to cover the basic costs of education (teacher salaries, textbooks, materials, and more); and categorical funding targeted to specific purposes (reducing class sizes, programs for English language learners, special education, and more).

Opponents argue that categorical funding limits local districts flexibility and stifles innovative approaches to improve student achievement. But in one of the most relevant studies of categorical fundingState Policies That Pay: A Survey of School Finance Policies and Outcomeseducation researchers Hightower, Mitani, and Swansons national survey found that targeted categorical funds in fiscal year 2008 mostly went toward the following program areas: special education, transportation, capital outlay/ debt service, technology, or gifted and talented programs.

The survey questions also asked about their views regarding the effectiveness of categorical funding in helping states to meet student improvement goals. We supplemented our survey with interviews in four statesArkansas, California, Ohio, and Wisconsinto better understand the impact of categorical funding on school and district efforts to improve student performance and meet the requirements of state and federal accountability policies. Based on our review of the prior research, we asked survey respondents to identify the categorical programs in their state from a list provided.

As such, we examined whether the use of categorical funding had changed in the past five years, the impact of the economic downturn on their use, and the locus of control in each state. At the other end of the spectrum, the change from FY 2008 to the 2012-13 school year was more varied: All five states with the fewest number of categorical-funding programs increased their use. Categorical allotments for staff development and technology were eliminated due to the economic downturn, reported the respondent from North Carolina.

But state respondents are more neutral on whether categorical funding helped schools and districts meet the requirements of the No Child Left Behind Act. While a plurality of the state survey respondents remained neutral on these topics, feelings were more mixed than on the questions around categorical funding helping schools and districts meet student performance targets and NCLB requirements. Six of our study states reported a similar practice: Alabama, Wisconsin, South Carolina, Mississippi, Massachusetts, and Utah.

(see Figure 7) The accuracy of this response is uncertain, as state respondents may not know how districts at the local level use general fund money. As noted earlier, we supplemented our survey with interviews with district-level respondents in four statesArkansas, California, Ohio, and Wisconsinto better understand the impact of categorical funding on school and district efforts to improve student performance and meet the requirements of state and federal accountability policies. There was a sense that local actors are best suited to make decisions about how to spend money to meet the needs of their specific students.

Districts also noted that overly strict restrictions on categorical programs prevented them from using the money in ways they deemed appropriate at times. Districts would prefer the flexibility to spend categorical funding on people, programs, or materials and supplies to meet their students needs in ways they deem most effective.

Categorical Grants

Categorical grants can only be used for a specific purpose, and are given out to state and local governments by federal entities. It is very specific, and can only be used for the one defined objective. Entities are not required to accept these categorical grants, but if they do, they are required to all the rules and regulations that are laid out beforehand. This article with talk more about categorical grants, and give some examples of some.

Head Start programs

Categorical grants are given to government agencies and entities that are to be used for a very specific purpose. The grants are awarded to applicants that can meet all of the predefined categories. Those who receive these grants must report back frequently to show the money is being used correctly. Some examples of these categorical grants are

Definition of Categorical Grants

Imagine you are the governor of a state, and you need funding for state projects. How would you like to receive a boatload of money from the federal government? Sounds good, right? Not so quick… there’s always a catch!This is the basic idea of a

Categorical Grants and the Federal System

Categorical grants are a result of the United States’s federal system. With this system, the federal government has power in some areas, such as military spending, while the state and local governments have power over other areas, such as schooling, roads and law enforcement. But just because certain areas are the domain of local governments does not mean that the federal government can’t influence them. Instead, the federal government uses money to convince the states to comply with national goals. This is where categorical grants come into play.Take education, for example. Nowhere in the Constitution does it say that the federal government should provide for education. Yet, we have a Department of Education in Washington, D.C. Why is that? The simple answer is that the Department of Education does not provide schooling. Instead, it provides federal money to local states to oversee schooling. However, the money is contingent upon local governments meeting the requirements set by the Department of Education.Categorical grants are the most common types of grants given by the federal government to state and local governments, but they are not the only type. There also exist

Types of Categorical Grants

There are two ways in which categorical grants are distributed. The first way is throughBut how was that money distributed? Clearly, some states have higher levels of poverty than other states. So using a formula, the money was distributed to the different states based on the poverty levels and the number of people in each state.Another type of categorical grant is a

Examples of Categorical Grants

Categorical grants are a major part of American society, even if we don’t always realize it. Anti-poverty programs, such as Medicaid and Head Start, are categorical grants. Likewise, the national drinking age is a result of a categorical grant. In order for states to receive federal-highway-funding money, all states have to make 21 years of age the official age to drink. Otherwise, the state would not get the federal grant money.A controversial categorical grant has been the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, sometimes called Obamacare. This program, among other things, gives states massive amounts of money in order to start private insurance exchanges to help individuals buy insurance. Because of the controversial nature of the bill, some Republican governors have refused federal government money in order to not comply with the federal government’s requirements. They have, thus, left billions of dollars on the table as an act of protest against the controversial piece of legislation.

The Conditions for Money

State governments rely on federal funding for a wide variety of projects and programs. The federal government handles this need for money through grants, specifically categorical grants. Categorical grants are money given to state and local governments for programs and projects with specific limitations on how that money is to be spent. The process of obtaining these grants can vary depending on the grant.

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