Venomous Snakes in Alabama?

Fortunately for Alabamians, there arent many venomous serpents in the Yellowhammer State, but several of them are common, and close encounters with them should be avoided when possible.

People encounter snakes in a lot of different ways at home in the rafters of their garage or barn, in their gardens, while walking on trails in wooded areas. Secor said to tell the difference, remember the popular rhyme: If red touches yellow, kill a fellow.

Water snakeCopperheads and timber rattlesnakes will hold their ground, coil up, and, if you bother them, they may defend themselves or slither off, he said. With a global reputation for excellence, UA provides an inclusive, forward-thinking environment and nearly 200 degree programs on a beautiful, student-centered campus. As the states largest higher education institution, UA drives economic growth in Alabama and beyond.

What is deadliest snake in Alabama?

Eastern Diamondback Rattlesnake. It has facial pits and elliptical pupils like the other pit vipers. This snake is the most dangerous of venomous snakes in Alabama.

How many venomous snakes are in Alabama?

Alabama is one of the most biologically diverse areas in the United States. Although we have 66 known species and subspecies of snakes, only 6 are venomous. Learn more about Alabama’s 6 venomous snakes and how to react if you encounter one in the wild.

Does Alabama have Cobras?

This group includes the eastern diamondback rattlesnake, timber rattlesnake, pigmy rattlesnake, copperhead, and cottonmouth. The sixth venomous snake in Alabama is the coral snake. This fairly small, secretive relative of the cobra has black and red rings separated by yellow rings, and a black snout.

What 3 states have no venomous snakes?

Snake species. The United States has about 30 species of venomous snakes, which include 23 species of rattlesnakes, three species of coral snakes, two species of cottonmouth, and two species of copperhead. At least one species of venomous snake is found in every state except Hawaii, Rhode Island, and Alaska.

Finding a snake in Alabama isnt a difficult task. With the variety of terrains the state has to offer, almost anywhere you go, youll find something slithering around. Like most states, Alabama has a mixture of both non-venomous and venomous snakes. In total, Alabama plays host to 50 different species of snake. Due to the mix of terrains throughout the state, its quite common to see these snakes enjoying their habitat.

Two venomous snakes who call Alabama home are even considered endangered, while the copperhead is one of the most encountered. The cottonmouth is found throughout the state of Alabama but is most common in the Coastal Plain Swamps.

These are the only venomous water snakes in North America and are best known for their large size and white mouths. The cottonmouth thrives quite well in aquatic areas by feeding on fish, turtles, small snakes, baby alligators, and even lizards. Adult cottonmouths do not have any natural predators, but young snakes may be preyed upon by otters, raccoons, and large birds.

Image Credit: Vladislav T. Jirousek, ShutterstockSpecies: Crotalus horridus Longevity:30 yearsGood to own as a pet? The timber rattlesnake is found throughout most of Alabama but due to habitat issues, they are now gone from areas they once populated. This snake is a heavy-bodied creature most famous for its tan rattle that alerts people and prey to their strike.

Bobcats, hawks, and even coyotes are among the predators who will attack and eat young timber rattlesnakes. Image Credit: James DeBoer, ShutterstockSpecies: Sistrurus miliarius Longevity:20+ yearsGood to own as a pet? Rarely seen over the past few years, the few visuals have taken place in the extreme southern parts of the state.

Mostly gray in coloration, these snakes are quite small and have tiny rattles that can barely be heard. Hawks, owls, raccoons, and other snakes are the pigmy rattlesnakes natural enemies and may be contributing to their decrease in numbers. Image Credit: Patrick K. Campbell, ShutterstockSpecies: Micrurus fulvius Longevity:7 yearsGood to own as a pet?

The eastern coral snake is rapidly declining in the state of Alabama and may be considered endangered. Known for the diamond patterns on their back and the rattles on their tails, this snake is a pit viper that feeds on most small creatures. Image Credit: Jeff Holcombe, ShutterstockSpecies: Coluber constrictor Longevity:10 yearsGood to own as a pet?

This species is easy to find throughout the state, but enjoy staying in areas where terrains meet such as baselines of swamps. The black racer is not a picky eater and will feast on mice, lizards, small birds, and almost anything it can get. The most feared enemy of this snake are birds of prey who are known to add the black racer to their meals.

Image Credit: Nathan A Shepard, ShutterstockSpecies: Heterodon platirhinos Longevity:12 yearsGood to own as a pet? The eastern hognose snake , also known as the puff adder, is another species in Alabama with dwindling numbers. Ideal for life in any of the states terrain, these snakes prefer to feed on mostly toads and salamanders but dont mind adding small mammals and birds to their list.

The background color of the eastern milk snake features a gray or black while reddish-brown bands cover the rest of the body. The diet of the eastern milk snake consists mostly of small animals, preferably mice. Although found throughout the state, this snake prefers life in eastern Alabama, feasting mostly on mice and eggs.

Preferring life near the water, this snake is brown with lighter bands running the length of its body. These water snakes feed on aquatic creatures such as small fish, tadpoles, and frogs. These snakes are considered great pets and live up to 9 years in captivity, but little is known about their longevity in the wild.

Snapping turtles are one of the biggest threats to these snakes and often make them a food source. This snake is fairly common in Alabama but appears to have dwindling numbers in the southern areas of the state. Never wear open-toed shoes when walking through the woods Wear pants when possible, even if its hot outside Keep a visual of at least 3 to 5 feet ahead of you at all times Avoid placing your hands or feet in areas where you cannot see When encountering a snake, move away slowly, especially if you are unaware of the species

Keep in mind, when venturing into the wilderness, swamps, or other areas where snakes are common, stay aware, listen, and keep your eyes peeled. Nicole is the proud mom of Baby, a Burmese cat and Rosa, a New Zealand Huntaway.

Approximately 40 species of snakes occur in Alabama, and only six of these are venomous. Yet these six attract a lot of attention. Get a crowd of people together and yell snake and youre bound to get a reaction. Since early times, people have had a mysterious fascination with snakes. They have been used in religious ceremonies and for medicinal purposes. To some people, snakes conjure up an image of evil. Yet, in reality, snakes as a group are very beneficial to humans, especially because snakes help control farm pests that can transmit diseases.

Sincethe majority of snakes in Alabama are nonvenomous and pose no threat to humans, their varied feeding habits make them valuable to have around for rodent and insect control. Most snakes, such as the common kingsnake, bury their eggs under loose dirt or in decaying logs, leaving the young to hatch and fend for themselves.

Since snakes are helpful to humans, as well as being a part of our natural environment, it is important that we learn to distinguish venomous and nonvenomous varieties. Unlike the pit viper, the coral snake has a small head, round pupils, and a slender body. The diamondback likes the relatively dry pine flatwoods and longleaf pine-turkey oak hills of southern Alabama.

Its diet includes insects, snails, fish, frogs, baby alligators, lizards, turtles, snakes, bird eggs, small mammals, and carrion. The typical body markings are complete bands of alternating red and black, separated by narrow yellow rings. The coral snakes venom is conducted through a pair of short, erect, grooved fangs near the frontof the upper jaw.

Venomous Snakes Found in Alabama

Up first, let’s take a look at the venomous snakes in Alabama. As you will see, several of these species are far more common to encounter than others. Two venomous snakes who call Alabama home are even considered endangered, while the copperhead is one of the most encountered.

Copperhead

The copperhead is the most encountered venomous snake in the state of Alabama. These venomous snakes are found in most regions of the state and are in no danger of conservation concerns. They are known for their reddish coloring, dark crossbands, and hourglass designs. Copperheads are carnivores and live quite well eating mice, small snakes, small birds, and lizards. Copperheads can also become victims and are often hunted by the kingsnake, racer, and cottonmouth. These snakes are known as ambush hunters and have been noted with aggressive tendencies when approached.

Cottonmouth

The cottonmouth is found throughout the state of Alabama but is most common in the Coastal Plain Swamps. These are the only venomous water snakes in North America and are best known for their large size and white mouths. The cottonmouth thrives quite well in aquatic areas by feeding on fish, turtles, small snakes, baby alligators, and even lizards. Adult cottonmouths do not have any natural predators, but young snakes may be preyed upon by otters, raccoons, and large birds. When threatened, these snakes are known to vibrate their tails as a warning before striking.

Timber Rattlesnake

The timber rattlesnake is found throughout most of Alabama but due to habitat issues, they are now gone from areas they once populated. This snake is a heavy-bodied creature most famous for its tan rattle that alerts people and prey to their strike. Varying in colors, the timber rattlesnake has crossbands with a reddish-colored dorsal stripe. These snakes prefer a diet of small rodents, chipmunks, shrews, and even squirrels. Bobcats, hawks, and even coyotes are among the predators who will attack and eat young timber rattlesnakes.

Pigmy Rattlesnake

The pigmy rattlesnake is on the decline in the state of Alabama. Rarely seen over the past few years, the few visuals have taken place in the extreme southern parts of the state. Mostly gray in coloration, these snakes are quite small and have tiny rattles that can barely be heard. These snakes most commonly eat mice, lizards, small birds, and frogs. Hawks, owls, raccoons, and other snakes are the pigmy rattlesnake’s natural enemies and may be contributing to their decrease in numbers.

Eastern Coral Snake

The eastern coral snake is rapidly declining in the state of Alabama and may be considered endangered. These snakes are best known for their red, black, and yellow-colored bands. Known to eat mostly small snakes, mice, and lizards, the coral snake finds itself falling victim to most other snakes in the state. These snakes aren’t considered aggressive but are known for having the most toxic venom of any snake in North America.

Eastern Diamondback Rattlesnake

The eastern diamondback rattlesnake is another that is now extremely rare in the state of Alabama. Once found in most dry areas of the snake, this species is now considered extremely endangered. Known for the diamond patterns on their back and the rattles on their tails, this snake is a pit viper that feeds on most small creatures. Large birds, coyotes, and bobcats look at these snakes as a food source when possible.

Black Racer

The black racer is known for its slender body and coloring. Mostly black, these snakes may have a slightly gray color on their bellies. This species is easy to find throughout the state, but enjoy staying in areas where terrains meet such as baselines of swamps. The black racer is not a picky eater and will feast on mice, lizards, small birds, and almost anything it can get. This snake is only a day hunter, however, and is rarely seen on the prowl at night. The most feared enemy of this snake are birds of prey who are known to add the black racer to their meals.

Eastern Hognose Snake

The eastern hognose snake, also known as the puff adder, is another species in Alabama with dwindling numbers. Ideal for life in any of the state’s terrain, these snakes prefer to feed on mostly toads and salamanders but don’t mind adding small mammals and birds to their list. The eastern hognose snake can vary in colors with most being mostly black, grey, or olive color. These snakes are also well-loved by snake enthusiasts who consider them a great pet to own. In the wild, these snakes may fall prey to large birds and other snakes.

Eastern Milk Snake

The background color of the eastern milk snake features a gray or black while reddish-brown bands cover the rest of the body. This snake is best-known for enjoying the northern areas of Alabama but has been encountered far less over the past few years. The diet of the eastern milk snake consists mostly of small animals, preferably mice. Another favorite of snake owners, this snake’s longevity normally increases to 15 to 20 years when in captivity and well-cared for. The natural threats to this snake include raccoons, skunks, and opossums.

Gray Rat Snake

Both the gray and black rat snake is found in Alabama, but the gray is far more common. As the name says, this stout snake is gray in color with gray blotches covering its body. Although found throughout the state, this snake prefers life in eastern Alabama, feasting mostly on mice and eggs. Hawks and foxes are this snake’s biggest enemies.

Southern Water Snake

The southern water snake is fairly common in Alabama but prefers life on the Southern Coastal Plain. Preferring life near the water, this snake is brown with lighter bands running the length of its body. These water snakes feed on aquatic creatures such as small fish, tadpoles, and frogs. These snakes are considered great pets and live up to 9 years in captivity, but little is known about their longevity in the wild. Snapping turtles are one of the biggest threats to these snakes and often make them a food source.

Queen Snake

The queen snake is quite small and mostly appears brown or olive. This snake is fairly common in Alabama but appears to have dwindling numbers in the southern areas of the state. These water snakes prefer smaller bodies of water and spend most of their time feeding on crayfish. Due to their size, the queen snake falls prey to most predatory animals in the area including crayfish, their preferred prey.