Types of Corn Snakes?

Corn snakes are nonvenomous snakes found primarily in the southeastern United States. They are medium-size snakes, brightly colored with individual patterns. Corn snakes are fairly calm and easy to care for. They are popular as pets. But watch out, corn snake owners these elegant serpents are skilled at escaping from their homes.

Herpetologist Jeff Beane, collections manager of amphibians and reptiles at the North Carolina Museum of Natural Sciences , described corn snakes‘ back markings as “dark-margined red or brown mid-dorsal blotches and smaller lateral blotches on a ground color of red, orange, brown or gray.” These corn snakes are able to angle their scales outward to make them better at catching and digging in to the bark’s rough surface.

(Image credit: Tim Nowak and Hamidreza Marvi)Their heads are also distinctive, having what Beane described as a “spear-shaped blotch.” Well, snakes use their scales and body muscles to climb narrow crevices on tree bark, new research finds. (Image credit: Tim Nowak and Hamidreza Marvi )Sadly, corn snakes are often mistaken for copperheads and killed in the wild, according to the Virginia Department of Game and Inland Fisheries.

Without legs, snakes must get creative to slither up trees, and new research suggests they use the scales covering their bodies to make such climbs. Their scales and body muscles work together to push against the bark on the tree as they inch upward, the researchers said. According to Beane, corn snakes are probably most common in the longleaf pine forests and flat woods of the southeastern United States.

He also pointed out that a subspecies known as the Great Plains rat snake can be found from the Mississippi River to eastern Utah. In cold climates, corn snakes seek shelter in stump holes, mammal burrows or other subterranean refuges, Beane said. During the warmer months, corn snakes slither into abandoned buildings, invade rodents’ burrows looking for prey, and sometimes even climb trees, according to the Smithsonian Zoo .

Beane said that corn snakes “often seek refuge under sheltering objects such as logs, boards and sheet metal.” First, they bite the prey to get a firm grip on it, and then they quickly wrap their muscular bodies around the victim in tight coils. She lays them in rotting stumps, and in piles of decaying vegetation or other places where there will be enough heat and humidity for the eggs to incubate.

What is the best type of corn snake to get?

The albino (amelanistic) is the most popular corn snake morph. Others include the sunglow, the blizzard (which is white from nose to tail), the striped corn snake (which has stripes instead of saddles) and the strawberry snow morph (candy pink).

How do I identify a corn snake?

The corn snake can be distinguished from other rat snakes and from kingsnakes by the stripe extending from the back of its eye past the corner of its jaw, plus the large, bold black and white checkerboard pattern on its belly.

What is a lavender corn snake?

What is a lavender corn snake? The lavender morph is one of many different corn snake morphs—these morphs are basically different color palettes of the same snake. Lavenders are light pink, with dark purple-grey markings and striking, burgundy colored eyes.

How many Colours of corn snakes are there?

Corn Snakes come in a ton of different colors, commonly referred to as morphs. So, just how many different Corn Snake colors are available? Somewhere in the 700-800 range. That’s right – there’s a ton of variations of Corn Snake morphs.

Anerythristic/Anerythrism: Commonly shortened to Anery, Anerythristic means the absence of erythrism the red pigment in their skin (including the scales).

Abbreviated as Amel, refers to a snake with a total absence of melanin; the result of the gene mutation with the same name. Single Recessive Mutation

________________________________________________________ Single Recessive Mutation ________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________

Mutation: CompoundRecessive: Amelanistic, Anerythristic, Diffused, Masque AKA: Diffused Snow / Bloodred Snow ________________________________________________________

Mutation: CompoundRecessive: Amelanistic, Charcoal, Diffused, Masque Mutation & Selectively BredRecessive: Diffused, Masque Polygenetic: Red emphasis

Interspecies Hybrid: Amel Cornsnake X Emory’s Ratsnake Interspecies Hybrid: Cornsnake X Emory’s Ratsnake Mutation: CompoundRecessive: Amelanistic, Caramel

Mutation + Polygenetic Selectively BredRecessive: Amelanistic Single Recessive Mutation Single Recessive Mutation

Single Recessive Mutation Interspecies Hybrid: Amel Cornsnakes X Emory’s Ratsnake Single Recessive Mutation

Bloodred + Amel + Red Factor Single Recessive Mutation Mutation: CombinationRecessive: KastanieDominant:Tessera

Single Recessive Mutation Single Recessive Mutation Selectively bred Polytenetics – NOT a mutation

Single Recessive Mutation ________________________________________________________ Motley + Dilute + Anerythristic ________________________________________________________ Gold Dust mutation = Ultramel + Caramel (hybrid from Grey Ratsnake)

Kastanie + Motley + Amelanistic ________________________________________________________ Ultramel + Motley (hybrid from Grey Ratsnake) Polygenetic (selectively-bred) non-mutation ________________________________________________________

Amel Creamsicle + Okeetee pattern ________________________________________________________ Amel + Lavender ________________________________________________________ Single Dominant mutation

Diffused + Masque + Charcoal ________________________________________________________ Charcoal Hypomelanistic ________________________________________________________ Single Recessive Mutation ________________________________________________________

This obvious striped pattern is not from a Striped mutation The Ultramel gene mutation was borrowed from Grey Ratsnakes via crossing an Ultramel mutant with a Cornsnake. Therefore, all Ultra types are interspecies hybrids.

Corn Snakes are one of the best beginner snakes as they stay small, have a simple diet and enjoy handling. They are also popular for their unique color and pattern combinations.

MorphColorPriceRank Amelanistic Low contrast red with yellows and oranges.$50 $7525 Anerythristic A Pale gray with dark gray blotching and black margins.$7035 Anerythristic B The same as Anerythristic A morphs but they not develop yellow coloring with age.$10036 Black Dark gray with charcoal blotching outlined by black margins.$1005 Blizzard Completely white with red eyes.$1509 Blood Red Vibrant red with faint or no patterning and a white belly.$7010 Blood Red Pied-Sided Deep red with some faint patterning and a white belly.$25037 Blue Bluish-gray with darker gray blotches.$20013 Butter A bright yellow snake with red eyes.$7024 Candy Cane High contrast of red and white.$5015 Caramel Yellow-brown base with caramel, light brown or rich chocolate dorsal and lateral blotches.$4018 Coral Snow Light pink and peachy-orange blotchings with a white faded belly.$13022 Creamsicle A yellow base with dark yellow-orange blotches.$7019 Crimson High color contrast snakes with a dazzling crimson color scheme.$7032 Eastern Tan or brown and reddish-orange dorsal and lateral blotches.$3023 Florida Tan-orange base color with reddish-orange blotches.$3012 Fluorescent Orange Vibrant orange with dark red splotches and white margins.$14033 Ghost Pale gray base color with a muted color.$508 Hypomelanistic Vibrant combinations of light reds, whites, oranges and yellows.$7011 Jungle An unpredictable codominant morph.$8029 Lavender Pink base color and lavender blotching.$751 Miami Phase Silver base color with burnt-orange blotches.$707 Motley Dark lines down their spine and belly scales with dashed lateral blotching.$50 $7021 Normal Reddish-brown blotches on light brown or gray.$3020 Okeetee Deep red or burnt orange dorsal blotches and a medium brown or deep orange base.$502 Opal Almost white with a faint yellow patterning and burgundy eyes. $6530 Palmetto White with random red, orange, and yellow scales.$1,5004 Peppermint Stripe Dark pink with faint pink striping along their body.$17534 Pewter Silver-lavender snakes with faint blotching that fades with age.$90 $10031 Pink Light pink and pale dorsal blotches with orange center stripes.$12016 Red Amelanistic Bright reds and oranges and vibrant red dorsal blotches.$10038 Reverse Okeetee Peach with red-orange blotches surrounded by a thick white margin.$12528 Scaleless Their body is without scales.$5006 Slowinskis Grayish-brown with large chocolate brown dorsal blotches.

]39 Snow White with pink or beige patterning.$1003 Sunkissed A beautiful combination of sunset orange and red with a masquerade-mask shaped head pattern.$8014 Tessera Thin dark-edged dorsal stripes and dense square lateral blotches.$8026 Texas Light beige base color with reddish-brown dorsal blotches.$3027 Zig-Zag A pattern morph that only changes the belly of the snake.$17540 The Lavender morph is a beautifully unique color variant with the standard corn snake pattern. Adults normally brighten with age to have a pink base color and lavender blotching . Despite having the lavender genetic trait these snakes are actually known as mocha or cocoa morphs.

The first lavender variety was bred in the 1980s as a cross between a snow corn (#3) and a wild-caught snake. These morphs have deep red or burnt orange dorsal blotches with black margins. Their base color is always a medium brown or deep orange.

Purchasing captive bred snakes is important to reduce pressure on the wild population. These snakes are totally white as hatchlings and develop coloration as adults. They are a result of incomplete dominance genes when two recessive leucistic traits are bred together.

These morphs are white with random red, orange, and yellow scales speckled across their body. In 2008 the first wild Palmetto morph was discovered and collected from South Carolina. The breeder who collected the first wild palmetto was able to produce offspring.

Their name comes from the place they are normally found in Southwestern Florida. The only way to guarantee a Black Devils Garden morph is if the breeder knows the parent was collected from this area. These snakes are typically dark gray with charcoal blotching outlined by black margins.

As juveniles they have a much higher contrast of light to dark gray similar to baby black rat snakes. However, they still have full or partial belly scutes otherwise they would be unable to slither . The Miami phase is named after the area of Florida they are found in Miami-Dade county .

An interesting fact about this morph is that because of where they live, they prefer to eat lizards and not rodents. These corn snake morphs are famous for their unique silver base color . Interestingly, halfway down their body their color and pattern inverses their base becomes reddish-brown and their blotches become gray!

When they are bred with other corn snake morphs, they produce pastel or neutral colors. A wild caught anerythristic type B (#36) corn snake was collected and bred with a charcoal morph. Hatchlings have some patterning but this fades with age making adults more desirable than juveniles.

The red color comes from a recessive trait that was discovered by mating wild caught snakes. Hypomelanistic morphs are sometimes called Rosy corn snakes. When compared to other corn snake morphs they are a lighter shade of color .

Red White Orange Yellow Gray Brown When combined with codominant genes this trait can create beautiful hybrids that can be purchased for $70. This snake is a wild type color variation that can be found all across the state of Florida.

This gene is produced by breeding the codominant dilute and charcoal morphs (#36) : As adults their pattern may fade and leave a bluish-gray body with variable hues. The Sunkissed corn snake morph is a beautiful combination of sunset orange and red.

Sunkissed morphs have a dark reddish-orange color with deep red dorsal and lateral blotches. Their head has a distinct masquerade-mask shaped pattern of dark red-orange on a lighter orange base. The Candy Cane is a high contrast color variation that is adorable.

As hatchlings these snakes have a white base color with vibrant red dorsal and lateral blotches. The high contrast of red and white is what gives the Candy Cane its name. Like most motley pattern morphs they have elongated dashes instead of lateral blotches.

Pink morphs require several genes to produce which gives them a higher price of $120. Instead fancy is a collective term used to describe any corn snake that is not common ( i.e. normal ). Pet stores or places that do not specialize in breeding snakes often refer to unknown morphs as fancy because they dont know the full genetic composition.

If you have purchased a fancy variety feel free to post a comment so we can help you identify it. After careful breeding consistent clutches began being produced in captivity. Their dorsal and lateral blotches can be caramel, light brown or rich chocolate.

The Creamsicle is a designer corn snake morph that takes two rounds of breeding: Normal is the name given to a standard wild type corn snake. The Normal corn snake typically has reddish-brown blotches on a light brown or gray base .

This snake is commonly used by breeders to produce other morph variations. A Motley pattern creates dark lines down the spine and sides of the belly scales . They sometimes have light pink or white margins and yellow along the sides of their body.

Their bellies are normally white with pale or faded markings unlike the high contrast checkers in most corn snake morphs. Selective breeding has produced a bright yellow snake with red eyes . The first wild Amelanistic corn snake was collected in North Carolina in 1953.

Every amelanistic snake lacks the brown and black pigments found in melanin. Tesseras normally have one thin dark-edged dorsal stripe and dense square lateral blotches. Standard Tesseras can be purchased for $80 but hybrids with rare colors are more expensive.

The Texas corn snake is another regional subgroup of this species similar to the Eastern (#23) . Texas corns normally have a light beige base color with reddish-brown dorsal blotches that have strong black margins. These snakes usually have a peach base with red-orange blotches that are surrounded by a thick white margin.

Reverse Okeetees retain their contrast and vibrancy into adulthood and cost $125. These two species form an unpredictable codominant corn snake morph. Hatchling Opals are a light pink color with peach blotches and white margins.

Adults turn almost white with a faint yellow patterning that is barely visible. Pewters are normally a silver-lavender color with faint blotching that fades with age. However, do not get this designer morph confused for a common red corn snake.

The Fluorescent Orange is an interesting color morph that combines several recessive amelanistic genes. Adults take on a vibrant orange base with dark red splotches and white margins. They have red pupils with pink irises and a clean white belly.

These snakes cost $175 because of their unique pattern and difficult breeding requirements. The first adult Anerythristic B was caught in 1984 in Florida and was used to help start the Blizzard morph (#7) lines. The biggest difference is this species does not develop yellow coloring with age .

Like all Anery morphs these snakes lack red, yellow and orange pigmentation. This snake is normally used to mute or gray-out the coloration of other morphs and are therefore highly valued at $100. The main difference is that the white trickles up the sides of the belly and across the lateral portion of the snake.

The pied gene is similar to that found in ball pythons and is responsible for this snakes creeping white scales. They normally have high variation and contrast when compared to the yellow Amelanistic. The Slowinski is actually a different species of corn snake known as the Patherophis slowinskii.

This snake is native to small regions of Louisiana, Texas and Arkansas. Slowinski corn snakes have a grayish-brown base with large chocolate brown dorsal blotches . Their heads have two dark stripes along the sides that meet between their eyes in a point like a Texas (#27) .

This pattern morph only changes the belly of a corn snake. Corn snake morphs are loved for their vivid colors and unique patterns. If you are looking to add a small and unique snake to your collection one of these morphs will be perfect!

Corn snakes tolerate handling well, rarely show aggression and have a simple diet.

Snakes are incredibly diverse creatures, often wearing a wide range of vibrant colors in complex and beautiful patterns. As naturally curious creatures, humans have experimented with popular snake breeds such as corn snakes, crossing them to create even more interesting and unique colorations and patterns. The result is that today we have tons of beautiful corn snake variations to pick from. No matter your personality and preferences, youre certain to find a corn snake that fits you in this wide range of options.

Image Credit: fivespots, ShutterstockThis morph results in a striking snake thats pure white on its entire body with red eyes that stand out against the pale scales. They have blotches that arent visible because theyre white, though these sometimes develop yellow outlines as the snake reaches maturity.

They lack the traditional pattern that most corn snakes wear and are a solid red or orange instead. This results in a snake thats actually gray but often takes on a blueish coloration with dark grey blotches. Calico snakes dont begin to show their distinguishing white freckles and splotches until theyre close to maturity, making them expensive to raise.

Worse, they tend to develop blistering beneath their white patches, making many people think theyre unhealthy. Image Credit: Nutthagreth Chaiwong, ShutterstockFor such a unique and interesting-looking morph, candy cane snakes are very affordably priced, with specimens available for a mere $50. Image Credit: fivespots, ShutterstockConsidering all the work it takes to create a creamsicle morph, these snakes are rather affordable with an average price of around $70.

Image Credit: fivespots, ShutterstockCrimson corn snakes have dark red blotches over a lighter orange base with high contrast colors that really pop. Dilute genetics are commonly crossed with other mutations as they fade the snakes colors, giving it a somewhat pastel appearance. As a pure dilute, theyre not much more than a standard corn snake, but they can get pretty pricey when crossed with other variations.

These snakes begin life as pink hatchlings but will mature into orange adults that feature patches of dark red outlined in white. Image Credit: Mboychuk, Wikimedia CommonsTo create a ghost morph requires crossing an anerythristic type A with a hypomelanistic corn snake. The resulting ghost has a normal pattern with faded colors, causing them to appear pale gray with patches that are reddish-brown.

With distinct looks and an affordable price of about $50, lavender morphs are highly popular corn snakes. Unlike most corn snakes, this variation prefers to eat lizards rather than rodents, which can make them harder to feed in captivity . Image Credit: Fullmerdvm, FlickrThere are many pattern morphs that corn snakes can display, but motley is the most common, so its usually combined with other variations.

This is a very rare and difficult variation to produce that requires the combination of three recessive genes; amelanistic, cinder, and stripe. Pewter corn snakes are a cross between the anerythristic B morph and a blood red variation. They have orange center stripes with red dashes along their bodies instead of the lateral blotches common to most corn snakes.

Since they require a combination of several morphs to create, pink corn snakes arent cheap, with prices starting at $120. These are set on top of a peach base, creating a hard contrast that this morph retains through adulthood. They have a similar head pattern to a Texas corn snake with two stripes that meet between their eyes.

A combination of amelanistic and anerythristic A morphs, snow corn snakes are white in color and can have very pale patches or even pink to light tan patterns. Strawberry corn snakes are so similar to hypomelanistic ones that the trait was only recently shown to be a separate mutation. Image Credit: Novelyst, Wikimedia CommonsThis pattern is defined by the dorsal stripe that Tessera morphs have running down their backs.

Due to this stripe, their patterns are pushed down to the sides and squared off, turning them into a work of southwestern art. It creates an appearance thats almost patternless with grainy stripes and bellies that lack the common corn snake checkering. As awesome as these corn snakes colors appear on your screen, theyre far more incredible to see and touch in person.

A Canadian expat, Nicole now lives on a lush forest property with her Kiwi husband in New Zealand.

Corn snake morphs

Corn snakes are the most commonly bred snake species in the United States, according to ADW. Commercial breeders of domesticated corn snakes have developed hundreds of variations, or morphs (or breeds), through selective breeding.According to the Ratsnake Foundation Herpetological Society, morphs include:

Copperhead look-alike

Sadly, corn snakes are often mistaken for copperheads and killed in the wild, according to the Virginia Department of Game and Inland Fisheries. But according to Beane, “These species do not look at all alike to anyone familiar with snakes.” He recommends that people “get familiar with them” in order to learn how to tell them apart.People can tell the species apart by the markings. Copperheads have hourglass markings, whereas corn snakes‘ markings are blotchy and random. Copperheads also do not have the black-and-white checked belly. And as Beane said, “If you don’t plan on handling a snake, you don’t need to know what it is — just leave it alone.”Corn snakes have a “typically gentle disposition, though temperament varies,” he said. If threatened, they may vibrate their tails.

How big do corn snakes get?

Corn snakes are slender and range from 18 to 44 inches (45 to 112 centimeters), with the record at 72 inches (1.8 meters), according to the Florida Museum of Natural History.

Habitat

According to Beane, corn snakes are probably most common in the longleaf pine forests and flat woods of the southeastern United States. They range, however, “from the New Jersey Pine Barrens south to the Florida Keys and west to the Mississippi River.” He also pointed out that a subspecies known as the Great Plains rat snake can be found from the Mississippi River to eastern Utah.Corn snakes are active both day and night, but tend to be nocturnal in hot weather. They enjoy a “wide range of habitats,” Beane said. “Usually there’s at least some forest present, but [they] also occur in grasslands and other habitats.” In cold climates, corn snakes seek shelter in stump holes, mammal burrows or other subterranean refuges, Beane said. During the warmer months, corn snakes slither into abandoned buildings, invade rodents’ burrows looking for prey, and sometimes even climb trees, according to the Smithsonian Zoo.They enjoy manmade habitats, too, such as woodlots, abandoned buildings and barns. Beane said that corn snakes “often seek refuge under sheltering objects such as logs, boards and sheet metal.”

What do corn snakes eat?

“Juveniles feed mostly on lizards and frogs (especially tree frogs), but adults eat mostly mammals and birds,” Beane said. Rodents are corn snakes‘ favorite dinner. Not being venomous, these snakes don’t just bite their prey to kill it — they constrict it. First, they bite the prey to get a firm grip on it, and then they quickly wrap their muscular bodies around the victim in tight coils. Corn snakes squeeze their victims tightly until they suffocate and die. Then, corn snakes swallow their dinner whole, usually head first, reports the Smithsonian Zoo. Occasionally, they will swallow small prey alive.

Reproduction

According to Beane, corn snakes mate in both the spring and the fall. “Males may engage in ritual combat (body-shoving contests) when two or more meet in the presence of a receptive female,” he said. Corn snakes are oviparous, meaning that the mothers lay eggs. According to the ADW, the mother pops out 10 to 30 eggs any time from May to July. She lays them in rotting stumps, and in piles of decaying vegetation or other places where there will be enough heat and humidity for the eggs to incubate. Then, she slithers off, never to see the babies.The eggs gestate for about two months. When born, babies are 10 to 15 inches (25 to 38 cm) long and are patterned like adults, according to Herps of North Carolina. Their blotches, however, are much darker, being brown to nearly black on a grey or light-orange body.According to the Florida Museum of Natural History, they can live up to 22 years in captivity, though their life expectancy in the wild is less.

Conservation status

Historically, corn snakes were included in the genusWhile the Integrated Taxonomic Information System (ITIS) — a partnership of several agencies in the United States and abroad — has not adopted the new taxonomy, other organizations, such as the Animal Diversity Web and the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN), have. The IUCN states, “We retain this species inThe taxonomy of corn snakes is:

Amelanistic

Abbreviated as Amel, refers to a snake with a total absence of melanin; the result of the gene mutation with the same name.Single Recessive Mutation

Anerythristic

Anerythristic/Anerythrism: Commonly shortened to Anery, Anerythristic means the absence of erythrism — the red pigment in their skin (including the scales).Single Recessive Mutation

Motley Gold Dust

Gold Dust mutation = Ultramel + Caramel (hybrid from Grey Ratsnake)

Ultramel

The Ultramel gene mutation was borrowed from Grey Ratsnakes via crossing an Ultramel mutant with a Cornsnake. Therefore, all Ultra types are interspecies hybrids.

Corn Snake Morphs Color Chart

Corn snakes were some of the first snakesSome of these morphs are naturally occurring mutations. South Carolina and Florida have many natural corn snakes.Many corn snake morphs are selectively bred. Color morphs are typically more popular than pattern variations.The most popular colors are Lavender, Snow and Black:

Lavender

The Lavender morph is a beautifully unique color variant with the standard corn snake pattern.Hatchlings are typically dark gray with purple patterning. Adults normally brighten with age to have aSometimes lavender snakes have a brown or orange base color. Despite having the lavender genetic trait these snakes are actually known as “mocha” or “cocoa” morphs.The first lavender variety was bred in the 1980s as a cross between a snow corn (#3) and a wild-caught snake. Since then these beautiful snakes have remained the most popular corn snake morph.They can be purchased for $75.

Okeetee

The Okeetee is a wild morph that was first discovered in South Carolina. Collectors took specimens and began breeding them in captivity.Okeetees are still found in the wild. However, over collecting has led to a population decline and reduced sightings.These morphs haveTheir base color is always a medium brown or deep orange.If you are considering an Okeetee corn then select a private breeder. Purchasing captive bred snakes is important to reduce pressure on the wild population.

Snow

The Snow corn snake is sometimes known as a “white albino”. White albinos are beautiful snakes that can be purchased for $100.This morph is a combination of the Amelanistic (#25) and Anerythristic A (#35).Snow morphs are predominantly white but can have pale blotching. Some may have pink or beige patterning.These snakes areThis variety cannot occur naturally in the wild so they must be captive bred. Both traits (

Palmetto

The Palmetto morph is possibly one of the most unique in this list.They are a result of incomplete dominance genes when two recessive leucistic traits are bred together.These morphs are white with random red, orange, and yellow scales speckled across their body. They also have jet black pupils surrounded by off-white or blue-white irises.Since then only one more wild citing has been reported.The breeder who collected the first wild palmetto was able to produce offspring. They sold the first captive clutch for $4,000. Today these snakes are priced at $1,500.

Black

The Black morph is also called the Black Devil’s Garden corn snake.Their name comes from the place they are normally found in Southwestern Florida. The only way to guarantee a Black Devil’s Garden morph is if the breeder knows the parent was collected from this area.These snakes are typicallyBlack morphs are part of the anerythristic species.Anerythristic species have a recessive trait that is so prevalent the majority of corn snakes in the region either display the trait or carry the recessive allele.

Scaleless

The Scaleless corn morph is the most unique pattern morph. They are rarer than the Sunkissed Corn Snake (#14). This $500 snake is very rare to see.They are a hybrid snake bred from a Great Plains Rat Snake and common corn snake.These snakes are beautiful and their lack of scales highlights their natural color patterns.

Miami Phase

The Miami phase is named after the area of Florida they are found in –An interesting fact about this morph is that because of where they live, they prefer to eat lizards and not rodents. This can make it difficult for them to feed on rodents in captivity.A captive bred Miami can be purchased for $70.These corn snake morphs are famous for theirThey have burnt-orange blotches lined with black margins. Captive breeding has increased the contrast in this variety over time.

Ghost

Ghosts are a type of designer corn snake morph.They are selectively bred by mating hypomelanistic snakes with anerythristic type A (#35) morphs.Ghost morphs have a normal pattern but have a muted color.They are normally aAnother reason these morphs are popular is because they are phenotypically codominant. When they are bred with other corn snake morphs, they produce pastel or neutral colors.

Blizzard

The Blizzard morph is one of the more beautiful corn snakes and can be purchased for $150.The first Blizzard was born in 1984. A wild caught anerythristic type B (#36) corn snake was collected and bred with a charcoal morph.These snakes are bornAs they age sometimes they may develop faint “lemon-lined” margins around their blotches. They may also develop yellow checkering on their belly.

Blood Red

The Blood Red corn snake morph isHatchlings have some patterning but this fades with age – making adults more desirable than juveniles.The red color comes from a recessive trait that was discovered by mating wild caught snakes.Red morphs have completely white bellies! Because corn snakes are known for their belly patterns, the absence of any pattern makes them desirable to breeders.

Florida

Hypomelanistic morphs are sometimes called Rosy corn snakes.These snakes are recessive so have reduced melanin pigmentation. They can look like an albino or just a lighter-shade of color.When compared to other corn snake morphs they are aTheir lack of dark pigmentation allows them to be vibrant combinations of light:When combined with codominant genes this trait can create beautiful hybrids that can be purchased for $70.

Sunkissed

The blue corn snake morph has the blue dilute gene. This gene is produced by breeding the codominant dilute and charcoal morphs (#36):This leaves a gray snake that sometimes takes on a bluish hue.TheirYou can find a blue for $200 from a reputable breeder.

Candy Cane

The Candy Cane is a high contrast color variation that is adorable.Candy Canes are bred from a recessive amelanistic gene. This is normally introduced by breeding two Miami Phase morphs (#7) together – or a Miami and Creamlike (#19) morph.As hatchlings these snakes have a white base color with vibrant red dorsal and lateral blotches. TheAs they age this snake’s color may either fade or develop an orange coloration around their neck.This colorful morph can be purchased for $50.

Pink

The Pink morph is a designer snake that is a combination of the dilute-amelanistic (#25) and motley pattern (#21).Pink corn snake morphs have a light pink base with thick red margins.They haveLike most motley pattern morphs they have elongated dashes instead of lateral blotches. These dashes are red. Their eyes are red too.Pink morphs require several genes to produce which gives them a higher price of $120.

Fancy

Fancy corn snakes are not a single morph!Instead “fancy” is a collective term used to describe any corn snake that is not common (Pet stores or places that do not specialize in breeding snakes often refer to unknown morphs as fancy because they don’t know the full genetic composition.If you have purchased a fancy variety feel free to post a comment so we can help you identify it.

Caramel

Another popular corn snake morph is the Caramel.The first Caramel was wild caught and brought into captivity. After careful breeding consistent clutches began being produced in captivity.Caramels tend to have a yellow-brown base. Their dorsal and lateral blotches can beTheir common appearance and ease of breeding mean you can buy them for $40.

Normal

The Creamsicle is a designer corn snake morph that takes two rounds of breeding:Creamsicles normally haveThey also have red eyes.Creamsicle corn snake morphs can be purchased for $70.

Motley

The Motley corn snake is a pattern morph – not a color morph.Corn snake pattern morphs typically do not affect the color of the snake’s scales.The Motley pattern was the first recessive pattern morph discovered and has one of the most complex actions.A Motley pattern createsMotley snakes are common and cost $50 – $70.

Coral Snow

This designer morph is a combination of Hypomelanistic A, Amelanistic (#25), and Anerythristic (#36) genes. Because of their albino genes they have red eyes.Coral Snows have aThey sometimes have light pink or white margins and yellow along the sides of their body.Their bellies are normally white with pale or faded markings – unlike the high contrast checkers in most corn snake morphs.

Eastern

Eastern corn snakes are a wild type corn snake.They are found east of the Mississippi and from New Jersey to the tip of Florida.Easterns are not endangered and are easy to find. However, buying a captive bred specimen from a breeder is always recommended.Scientifically this snake is known as the Pantherophis guttatus species and comes in a variety of colors.Easterns are tan orThis corn snake is very similar to the Carolina and Florida species, however Eastern is the true name for this species.

Butter

The Butter morph is also known as a Snow Caramel because it is a hybrid of the Snow (#3) and Caramel (#18) morphs.Selective breeding has produced aThe yellow base is typically lighter than their blotches.Their pattern is fairly similar to a wild pattern.

Amelanistic

The first wild Amelanistic corn snake was collected in North Carolina in 1953. However, they were not successfully bred until 1961.The Amelanistic morph is the gene source for the standard albino.This gene is recessive and is inherited through normal breeding. Every amelanistic snake lacks the brown and black pigments found in melanin.These snakes are very low contrast and even have red eyes.Compared to the Red Albino (#38) this corn snake has more yellows and oranges.

Tessera

The Tessera is the second pattern morph in this list.Motley (#21) was the first recessive pattern and Tessera was the first dominant pattern.Tesseras normally have oneHomozygous Tesseras cannot be produced. It is thought the homozygous form of Tesseras is a lethal gene.Standard Tesseras can be purchased for $80 but hybrids with rare colors are more expensive.

Texas

The Texas corn snake is another regional subgroup of this species – similar to the Eastern (#23).They are wild type corn snake that cost $30.Texas corns normally haveThey have two stripes that cross their eyes and meet in a point between them.

Reverse Okeetee

The Reverse Okeetee is also known as an Albino Okeetee.These snakes usually have aTheir pattern is identical to the Standard Okeetee (#2) – just without melanin pigments.Reverse Okeetees retain their contrast and vibrancy into adulthood and cost $125.

Jungle

The Jungle corn snake is an interspecies hybrid!Jungle morphs are the result of mating a normal Corn Snake with a California King Snake.These two species form an unpredictable codominant corn snake morph.Some are black and white with aspects of both patterns. Some look exactly like one parent and are tan or brown with a single pattern.This morph is very interesting but their unpredictability and inability to breed makes them $80.

Opal

The Opal corn snake is a designer morph.They are a recessive combination of the Amelanistic (#25) and Lavender (#1) morphs.The change from hatchling to adult is one of the most drastic changes of any variety on this list.Hatchling Opals are a light pink color with peach blotches and white margins. They have bright red pupils with pink irises – similar to the Pink (#16) variety.Adults turn

Pewter

Pewters are also known as Peppercorn morphs.They are a designer hybrid of the Anerythristic B (#36) and Blood Red (#10).Pewters are normally aThis species costs $90 – $100 depending on how clean their pattern is.

Crimson

The Crimson morph is sometimes called the Red Corn Snake. However, do not get this designer morph confused for a common red corn snake.Crimsons are codominant snakes bred by breeding a Hypomelanistic (#11) to a Miami (#7).They have aThese snakes have a high color contrast with a dazzling crimson color scheme.

Fluorescent Orange

The Fluorescent Orange is an interesting color morph that combines several recessive amelanistic genes.They also change color with age.Hatchlings are pink with very light orange colorations.Adults take on

Peppermint Stripe

The Peppermint Stripe is a unique combination of the recessive amelanistic, cinder and stripe traits.Peppermint stripes are normallyThey have red pupils with pink irises and a clean white belly.Young Peppermints tend to have cloud-like fading on their heads. This intensifies to a pale pink with age.These snakes cost $175 because of their unique pattern and difficult breeding requirements.

Anerythristic A

The Anerythristic type A morph is also known as the Anery or Black Albino corn snake morph.Anerythristicism is the lack red, orange and yellow pigmentation.Their body coloration is aAs adults they can develop a yellow coloring around their throat and neck.

Anerythristic B

The first adult Anerythristic B was caught in 1984 in Florida and was used to help start the Blizzard morph (#7) lines.The Anerythristic type B corn snake is part of the same Anery complex as the type A (#35). The biggest difference is this speciesJust like the Anery A they are pale gray with dark gray blotches and black margins.Like all Anery morphs these snakes lack red, yellow and orange pigmentation.This snake is normally used to mute or gray-out the coloration of other morphs and are therefore highly valued at $100.

Blood Red Pied-Sided

The Blood Red Pied-Sided morph is a highly valued species at $250.They are a recent combination of the Blood Red (#10) gene and recessive Piebald gene.These snakes areThe pied gene is similar to that found in ball pythons and is responsible for this snake’s creeping white scales.

Red Amelanistic

The Red Amelantistic morph is also called the Red Albino and the Red Amel.Red Amels areTheir dorsal blotches are normally vibrant red too.They normally have high variation and contrast when compared to the yellow Amelanistic.

Slowinski’s

The Slowinski is actually a different species of corn snake known as the Patherophis slowinskii.They were only given species status in 2002 and are named after the famous herpetology Joseph Bruno Slowinski!This snake is native to small regions of Louisiana, Texas and Arkansas.Slowinski corn snakes have a grayish-brown base withThe easiest way to know that you have found a Slowinski is by their head pattern.Their heads have two dark stripes along the sides that meet between their eyes in a point – like a Texas (#27).These are wild morphs and are rarely sold.

Zig-Zag

The Zig-Zag is also known as the Zipper.This pattern morph only changes the belly of a corn snake.Rather than the standard maize pattern the Zipper morph causes the corn snake’s belly scales to realign in a zig-zag pattern along the center of their belly.It is a recessive trait that is being stabilized for consistent use in breeding.Most morphs with this pattern contain other designer genes such as the Aztec or Zagtec.

Amelanistic Corn Snake Morph

This variation occurs wildly. Though they weren’t bred in captivity until 1961, a wild specimen was captured in 1953. An amelanistic morph has low contrast between their colors, making a yellowish-orangeish-reddish snake with red eyes. An interesting fact is that this morph is the source of the gene for a standard albino. You can pick up an amelanistic corn snake for between $50-$75.

Anerythristic A Corn Snake Morph

Anerythristic A corn snakes are a pale gray color with patches of a darker gray outlined in black since they lack any yellow-orange or red pigment. However, they can show a small amount of yellow on their throat and neck when they’re fully mature. Also called anery or black albino corn snakes, this morph sells for about $70.

Anerythristic B Corn Snake

This variation is also called a charcoal morph or the Pine Island Black Albino. It looks pretty close to an Anerythristic A, but it’s a completely different mutation and even more difficult to find. They range in price from $80-$150.

Aztec Corn Snake Morph

Corn snakes with this mutation have a pattern of broken zig-zags down their sides that looks similar to many patterns in Aztec art; hence, the name. These are rather affordable, with prices starting at $65.

Black Corn Snake Morph

You could say that black is this morph’s short name because they’re also known as the black devil’s garden corn snake. These are a rare morph because the only one to truly make one is to get a parent from a particular area in the southwestern part of Florida. These snakes charcoal patches with black outlines over a dark gray base. You can pick up a black corn snake for $100.

Blizzard Corn Snake

This morph results in a striking snake that’s pure white on its entire body with red eyes that stand out against the pale scales. They have blotches that aren’t visible because they’re white, though these sometimes develop yellow outlines as the snake reaches maturity. This morph was surprisingly created by crossing a charcoal morph with an anerythristic B morph that was caught in the wild. Blizzard morphs are pretty costly, with prices beginning at about $150.

Blood Red Corn Snake

Blood red corn snakes are diffused snakes that were purposefully bred and didn’t occur as an accidental mutation. They lack the traditional pattern that most corn snakes wear and are a solid red or orange instead. While they’re very unique in appearance, they’re not very expensive. Prices start at $80.

Blue

This rare and valuable morph is a rather recent addition to the corn snake family. They were created by crossing a piebald with a blood red, resulting in a red snake that might have some faint patterning. They also have white bellies, with small trails of white reaching up from the underside of the snake towards their top. Due to their beauty and rarity, these morphs cost $250 on average.

Butter

Butter snakes are named for their yellow coloration. They’re also called snow caramels because they’re a mixed morph created by crossing two other morphs; snow and caramel. On top of their yellow base are lighter or darker blotches of yellow, but it’s really the red eyes that set off this morph’s appearance. Though striking, they can be purchased for as little as $70.

Calico

This is a rare trait that has fallen out of favor with breeders. Calico snakes don’t begin to show their distinguishing white freckles and splotches until they’re close to maturity, making them expensive to raise. Worse, they tend to develop blistering beneath their white patches, making many people think they’re unhealthy.

Candy Cane

For such a unique and interesting-looking morph, candy cane snakes are very affordably priced, with specimens available for a mere $50. They have a white base color with standout red patches along their bodies. Naturally, it’s this juxtaposition of red on white that earns them the name of candy cane.

Caramel

This is a naturally-occurring color variation that was captive-bred after first being captured in the wild. They have a base color of yellowish-brown with brown patches that range in shade from light to dark. These are very common morphs and they’re easy to breed, which is why they only cost about $40.

Cinder

Similar in appearance to charcoal corn snakes as babies, cinder corn snakes start to show red in their pattern as they age. Prices for a cinder morph begin around $90.

Coral Snow

This morph features light orange patches over a base color of faded pink. They can also have yellow or white along the sides of their bodies. The bellies of these snakes are usually white instead of the checkers that most corn snakes exhibit. They’re about $130 on average, making them one of the pricier variations.

Creamsicle

Considering all the work it takes to create a creamsicle morph, these snakes are rather affordable with an average price of around $70. These snakes have red eyes with bodies that are a yellow base and have orange-yellow patches. To create a creamsicle morph, you have to complete two rounds of breeding with different morphs, making them prohibitively difficult to create for the price.

Crimson

Crimson corn snakes have dark red blotches over a lighter orange base with high contrast colors that really pop. They cost about $70, so they’re one of the more affordable variations.

Diffused

Diffused corn snakes are all red or orange with none of the normal patterning that defines most corn snakes. Diffused snakes might have odd variations to their patterns when they’re young, but they’ll begin to fade as the snake nears adulthood. Prices begin at around $80.

Dilute

Dilute genetics are commonly crossed with other mutations as they fade the snake’s colors, giving it a somewhat pastel appearance. It looks almost like the snake is in shed, but with a shiny appearance. As a pure dilute, they’re not much more than a standard corn snake, but they can get pretty pricey when crossed with other variations.

Eastern

These are some of the most common corn snakes. They can be found in the wild in the eastern part of the US, ranging from southern Florida to as far north as New Jersey. Because they’re so common, these snakes are some of the cheapest-priced corn snakes, usually available for about $30.

Fancy

Fancy is kind of a catchall term for any corn snake that’s not a common variation. At many pet stores, they don’t know how to differentiate between specific corn snake morphs. So, they call them fancy corn snakes and figure it covers the whole range.

Fluorescent Orange

These snakes begin life as pink hatchlings but will mature into orange adults that feature patches of dark red outlined in white. They are striking creatures that are well deserving of the $140+ price tag that they commonly wear.

Ghost

To create a ghost morph requires crossing an anerythristic type A with a hypomelanistic corn snake. The resulting ghost has a normal pattern with faded colors, causing them to appear pale gray with patches that are reddish-brown. What sets them apart is that this pattern switches halfway down their body, meaning their other half is reddish-brown with gray patches. Despite their awesome looks, they’re one of the cheapest morphs with most specimens selling for around $50.

Hypomelanistic

Hypomelanism sounds complex, but it’s just a reduction in the amount of black pigment in a snake’s skin. It’s one of the most common of all color morphs and can produce a wide range of looks. They’re so common that they’re priced about the same as a standard corn snake.

Jungle

Jungle corn snakes aren’t just corn snakes anymore and they can have a rather unpredictable appearance. To create a jungle corn snake, you have to mix a standard corn snake with a California King Snake. While the results can be pretty cool, they can’t be bred, so they’re rather inexpensive at just 80.

Lava

Similar in appearance to a hypomelanistic morph that’s lacking black pigment, but shows a purplish color in the places where a hypo would show their small bit of remaining black pigment. You can get a corn snake with only the lava mutation for around $80. But they can cost over $300 when crossed with other mutations, like cinder, for example.

Lavender

With distinct looks and an affordable price of about $50, lavender morphs are highly popular corn snakes. They appear grey when young, but their color turns lavender with silver patches as they age. Though they’re affordable as a single morph, they cost considerably more once they’re mixed with other desirable morphs.

Miami Phase

Like many corn snake variations, the Miami phase corn snake is named for the area where they naturally occur. Unlike most corn snakes, this variation prefers to eat lizards rather than rodents, which can make them harder to feed in captivity. They have a silver base color with burnt-orange patches. They cost about $70, even though they’re a naturally-occurring variation.

Microscale

This is a rare morph that affects a snake’s scales rather than their color or pattern. The result is that they have tiny scales, which causes there to be gaps of skin between their scales. This creates a snake with a very unique texture and they can sell for $150 or more.

Motley

There are many pattern morphs that corn snakes can display, but motley is the most common, so it’s usually combined with other variations. This morph inverts the snake’s normal pattern, resulting in a ladder design going down their side and removing the checkered belly pattern that’s present on most corn snakes. Because this mutation is so commonplace, you can get motley morphs for as little as $30.

Normal

As you might guess, normal corn snakes are your average, run of the mill corn snakes. They’re brown or gray with patches that are a mix of red and brown. These snakes are some of the cheapest and they’re most commonly used to breed other morph variations.

Okeetee

This morph is characterized by a medium brown to orange base color with dorsal patches of a deep red or burnt orange outlined in black. They can also have lateral markings of orange or yellow. What’s interesting about this morph is that it’s a wild morph that was discovered in South Carolina. Unfortunately, they’ve been over-collected in the wild since their discovery, so they’re much harder to find now. You can purchase a captive-bred Okeetee for about $100.

Opal

Opal corn snakes are almost completely white with a very faint pattern of light yellow that’s so light it’s hard to make out. They have burgundy eyes as well. But these snakes change wildly throughout their lives. Hatchlings begin with light pink on their bodies, and eyes that have pink irises and red pupils.

Palmetto

This morph creates incredibly beautiful corn snakes. They’re a pure white color with splotches of orange-red and a few spots of black. Prices for these snakes start at $350 and reach $900.

Peppermint Stripe

This is a very rare and difficult variation to produce that requires the combination of three recessive genes; amelanistic, cinder, and stripe. Adults of this morph are usually a dark pink color with fainter pink stripes, though they can sometimes fade to a lighter pink with speckles as they age. Other traits of the peppermint stripe morph are their red pupils and white bellies. Since they’re so hard to produce, their high cost of about $175 isn’t surprising.

Pewter

Pewter corn snakes are a cross between the anerythristic B morph and a blood red variation. The result is a snake with a base color of light gray-lavender that has faint patches that get even less pronounced as the snake reaches maturity. They cost about $100 on average.

Pink

As the name would suggest, pink morphs are a light pink color. They have orange center stripes with red dashes along their bodies instead of the lateral blotches common to most corn snakes. They also display red eyes. Since they require a combination of several morphs to create, pink corn snakes aren’t cheap, with prices starting at $120.

Red Amelanistic

This morph usually results in a snake with bright red or orange coloration, beset with patches of another red color. They’re also referred to as red albinos and generally sell for around $100.

Red Coat

Red coat corn snakes have a deeper, more vibrant red coloration due to a gene mutation that intensifies the red pigment in their skin. These are common morphs and share a similar appearance with several other variations, so you can usually pick them up for as little as $60.

Reverse Okeetee

Also called the Albino Okeetee, the Reverse Okeetee has red-orange patches with white borders. These are set on top of a peach base, creating a hard contrast that this morph retains through adulthood. Pricing for this morph begins at about $125.

Scaleless

Based on their name, you’d expect these snakes to be devoid of scales, but they’re not. On top, scaleless corn snakes can have patches of scales missing, all of their dorsal scales gone, or anything between. These snakes still have scales on their bellies, and they often still have scales on their lips and sometimes their spines as well. As a very rare and desirable variation, snakes with this variation cost $450 and up.

Slowinski’s

This breed gets its name from the renowned herpetologist Joseph Slowinski. They’re a wildly-occurring corn snake that’s native to select areas in Louisiana, Arkansas, and Texas. They have a similar head pattern to a Texas corn snake with two stripes that meet between their eyes. This type of corn snake is rarely sold or bred in captivity.

Snow

A combination of amelanistic and anerythristic A morphs, snow corn snakes are white in color and can have very pale patches or even pink to light tan patterns. Their patterns don’t develop until adulthood though. As babies, they’re all white. They’re often referred to as white albinos and their pricing starts at about $100.

Strawberry

Strawberry corn snakes are so similar to hypomelanistic ones that the trait was only recently shown to be a separate mutation. This means that there are already many snakes with strawberry genetics in captivity. They have a bit more contrast than hypos and more pronounced red in their coloration, but they’re so common that they only sell for around $40.

Striped

This morph’s pattern is pretty self-explanatory. Rather than the traditional corn snake pattern, striped corn snakes are adorned with three or four lines that run down the length of their body. If you get a corn snake with just the striped variation, they’ll generally cost around $70-$100. But when mixed with other morphs as this variation commonly is, prices can be many times higher.

Sunkissed

There’s very little way to distinguish a sun-kissed corn snake from a hypomelanistic one. In fact, sunkissed snakes are often called hypomelanistic B, though they’re really a hypomelanistic Okeetee. They’re most often crossed with other morphs for striking effects, but you can get a sun-kissed for little more than a regular corn snake if it’s the only variation.

Tessera

This pattern is defined by the dorsal stripe that Tessera morphs have running down their backs. Due to this stripe, their patterns are pushed down to the sides and squared off, turning them into a work of southwestern art. They’re surprisingly affordable with prices beginning at just $75.

Texas

Texas corn snakes are so-named because they’re native to Texas. They’re a naturally-occurring corn snake. As such, they’re quite affordable, with prices generally falling near $30. These snakes have a light brown base color with brown patches. Their most defining feature is two stripes that cross their eyes, meeting in a point between them.

Terrazzo

This is a very rare variation that’s also quite new. It creates an appearance that’s almost patternless with grainy stripes and bellies that lack the common corn snake checkering. Their pricing starts at $150 and climbs from there.

Zig-Zag

While most pattern morphs have noticeably different patterning on the tops of their bodies, zig-zag corn snakes don’t. This trait, instead, alters the pattern of scales only on the snake’s belly. This causes them to have a zig-zag pattern; hence, the name. At $175, this is a pretty pricey variation, showing its desirability among breeders and buyers.