Types of Ball Pythons?

The ball python (Python regius), also called the royal python, is a python species native to West and Central Africa, where it lives in grasslands, shrublands and open forests. This nonvenomous constrictor is the smallest of the African pythons, growing to a maximum length of 182 cm (72 in).[2] The name “ball python” refers to its tendency to curl into a ball when stressed or frightened.[3]

The ball python is native to west Sub Saharan Africa from Senegal , Mali , Guinea-Bissau , Guinea , Sierra Leone , Liberia , Ivory Coast , Ghana , Benin , and Nigeria through Cameroon , Chad , and the Central African Republic to Sudan and Uganda . This species is known for its defense strategy that involves coiling into a tight ball when threatened, with its head and neck tucked away in the middle.

This defense behavior is typically employed in lieu of biting, which makes this species easy for humans to handle and has contributed to their popularity as a pet. In the wild, ball pythons favor mammal burrows and other underground hiding places, where they also aestivate . Parental care of the eggs ends once they hatch, and the female leaves the offspring to fend for themselves.

The ball python is primarily threatened by poaching for the international exotic pet trade . Other threats include habitat loss as a result of intensified agriculture and pesticide use. [1] Rural hunters in Togo collect gravid females and egg clutches, which they sell to snake ranches.

Wild-caught specimens have greater difficulty adapting to a captive environment, which can result in refusal to feed, and they generally carry internal or external parasites . Most captive ball pythons accept common rats and mice , and some eat birds, such as chicken and quail . Feeder animals are typically sold frozen and thawed by owners to feed to their pythons.

These snakes usually lay one clutch per year and the eggs hatch around sixty days later. Usually, these eggs are artificially incubated in a captive environment at temperatures between 8890 degrees Fahrenheit. It has been shown that the spider morph gene is connected with major neurological issues, specifically related to the snake’s sense of balance.

The ball python is particularly revered by the Igbo people in southeastern Nigeria , who consider it symbolic of the earth, being an animal that travels so close to the ground. Even Christian Igbos treat ball pythons with great care whenever they come across one in a village or on someone’s property; they either let them roam or pick them up gently and return them to a forest or field away from houses. If one is accidentally killed, many communities on Igbo land still build a coffin for the snake’s remains and give it a short funeral.

[25] [ obsolete source ] In northwestern Ghana , there is a taboo towards pythons as people consider them a savior and cannot hurt or eat them. According to folklore a python once helped them flee from their enemies by transforming into a log to allow them to cross a river. The Complete Ball Python: A Comprehensive Guide to Care, Breeding and Genetic Mutations .

“Searching for snakes: Ball python hunting in southern Togo, West Africa” . ^ “House of Commons Environment, Food and Rural Affairs Minutes of Evidence” . CS1 maint: multiple names: authors list ( link ) ^ “Breeders Meetings New Policy June 2017” .

“Exploring the African Traditional Belief Systems in Natural Resource Conservation and Management in Ghana” .

What are the different types of ball pythons?

Banana Ball Python. ….Albino Ball Python. ….Bumblebee Ball Python. ….Spider Ball Python. ….Pastel Ball Python. ….Mojave Ball Python. ….Lesser Ball Python. ….Blue-Eyed Leucistic Ball Python (BEL)

What is the most popular ball python?

The royal python , also known as the ball python, is the most popular large snake we sell and one of the 2 species we recommend for new keepers. They get quite thick and have a much larger head than other snakes but they still only get 4-6ft in length so they are still easy to keep.

What is the rarest ball python?

The rarest ball python morph is the pastel zebra morph.. The gene was first discovered in 2005 but not cultivated for successful breeding until 2015 by Roussis Reptiles. These amazing animals can be combined with recessive morphs like ghost and clow.

What type of ball python should I get?

The best choice will always be captive born and bred snakes because they are usually parasite free and most likely the healthiest. Any ball python should be well-started and eating prior to purchase.

Ball python morphs are selectively bred by isolating mutations that cause different pattern or color variations. We estimate there are now over 4,000 different morphs in captivity!

If you are considering adding this snake to your home, read on to learn about the 50 most popular ball python morphs and their color and pattern variations Morphs are bred by specialized snake breeders who try to isolate mutations found naturally in the wild.

The genes that make up ball python morphs are passed on through inheritance just like with humans. Codominance occurs when the offspring inherits two alleles (alternative forms of a gene) that have incomplete dominance. Alien Heads distorted heart-shaped blotches containing two symmetrical dark spots, like a pair of eyes.

Flaming lighter coloration bordering the sides of keyholes and alien heads around their base. MorphColorPricePopularity Rank Acid Dark brown or black base color with golden brown spots$1,50044 Albino Bright yellow and white snake with bright red eyes$250-$4003 Axanthic Gray, black, white, brown, and silver colors$2006 Banana Strong yellow colored blotches and spots against a tan base color$150-$2502 Black
(Black-Backed) A thick, unbroken stripe of concentrated pigment running down their spines$50-$10021 Black Pastel Dark, dusky black and shadowy gray base colors$1,00017 Blue-Eyed Leucistic Pure white with blue eyes$800-$1,00046 Blue-Eyed Lucy Faint yellow dorsal stripes with blue eyes$70048 Bongo Pastel Black base color that fades to white along the sides of the belly$300-$50049 Bumblebee The brightest yellow ones are called Killer Bees$45011 Butter Soft, creamy-yellow markings highlighted by a caramel-brown$10022 Candino Light pink or lavender base color and a bright yellow blotched pattern$30038 Candy Dark lavender, gray, and beige base colors while keeping the bright yellow patterning$35041 Champagne Dark brown in color with a light stripe down their spine$20030 Chocolate Dark chocolate-brown base colors with caramel colored keyhole and alien head spots$100-$25039 Cinnamon Rich brownish-red color and bronze rings$45018 Clown Tan and brown with copper undertones$20012 Coral Glow Dark lavender base coloration with bright orange blotches$25029 Dreamsicle White or pinkish in color with clouds$2,50034 Enchi Orange-tinted sides and a rounded pattern at the back of the head that shows some blushing$10015 Fire Coffee-brown with a thick, tan banding pattern$100-$40013 Fire Ivory Pink-lavender base color with graying blushing$37547 Ghi Ball Python Patternless, light colored bellies and a black base color$10050 Ghost Lighter tans, yellows, and even have gray flaming along the sides$10028 Highway Copper-brown to gray-brown$550-$65033 Ivory Patternless, pinkish-white color. They have a thin yellow stripe down their spine and jet black eyes$200-$30027 Lavender Albino Lavender base color with a well-defined, bright yellow pattern$40019 Lemon Blast Fine-lined, complex linear patterns of dark brown and black$20032 Lesser Dark brown, blushed-out base color that lightens towards the belly$12520 Mojave Dark brown to bluish-black$1007 Mystic Dark brown-black base that fades to a tan color towards the belly$15025 Pastel Blushing brown base color and clean white$755 Pewter Light brown or tan base color with a thick stripe along the spine$20023 Phantom Black base color that fades to tan as it approaches a white belly$10037 Piebald White base with patches of color that are filled with an erratic pattern$300-$4004 Pinstripe Light brown to copper color with a thick, patternless stripe$10014 Purple Passion Lavender-pink bodies with patternless sides$40016 Red Deep red undertone blotches$10031 Ringer A small spot or ring of white near the end of their tail$15045 Scaleless Totally scaleless with just belly scales$2,5009 Spider Tan-brown base colors that pale along the spine$1501 Spotnos Faded light brown spotting pattern on a dark alien head$15040 Stormtrooper White with gray and black markings was produced[n.a]26 Sunset Deep auburn-red with copper colored spotting$1,000-$1,50010 Super Blast Hazy, bright pastel yellow color$40043 Tiger Light yellow color that fades to an orange hue along the sides$200-$40042 Vanilla Blushed-out brown base with a faded head$10024 White No pigment with standard dark eyes$6508 Woma Brown sides that gradually lighten towards the spine$25036 Yellow Belly Yellowish tint on their bellies and a speckled pattern bordering their scutes$5035

They have thin, dark banding and spots along their bodies and distinct black markings on their head and face. Banana ball pythons possess a codominant gene first revealed in a clutch in 2003. Albinism means the snake is amelanistic and is not able to produce brown, black, red, or orange pigments in its scales.

Albinos are loved for their high contrast patterns that typically fade out to various shades of yellow. As the first affordable recessive morph, you will find them on sale for $250-$400, depending on their age and contrast level. The ratio of white to colored patches seems somewhat random too, though almost all Piebalds have a normal head.

These snakes have a normal pattern with a blushing brown base color and a clean white belly . This leaves the Axanthic with varying gray, black, white, brown, and silver colors. They have a high contrast normal pattern that tends to turn brown with age.

Since the recessive trait was discovered in 1997, these snakes have been sold to breeders around the world to create more morph variations. This Ball Python typically has a base color of dark brown to bluish-black. The Mojave Pattern is similar to the normal alien-head but has flaming and contains only a single small keyhole mark.

White Wedding pythons are considered the cleanest of all the leucistic patterns. This deep auburn-red snake has copper colored spotting and a dark red head. The Bumblebee ball is a very intricately patterned snake bred from the Pastel and Spider genes.

The brightest yellow morphs are called Killer Bees and retain their color into adulthood, unlike most snakes that fade with age. Darker variations of tan-yellow are $175, but a Killer Bee costs $450 depending on the level of contrast. Clown ball pythons possess a recessive mutation that affects both their color and pattern.

They are normally tan and brown with copper undertones that fade towards their belly and mellow with age. The Clown has a unique head with a complex pattern of light and dark shades. They are a mix of codominant genes that create a coffee-brown snake with a thick, tan banding pattern.

Super Fires are commonly known as Black-Eyed Leucistic pythons and are white with various shades of yellow spots along their spine with red pupils. First named in 2001, the Pinstripe morph is loved by many snake owners for the dominant stripe along their spine. Pinstripes are popular with breeders because they are frequently used to mate with other morphs to reduce patterns and create a more pronounced spine.

These snakes are typically a light brown to copper color with a thick, patternless stripe that stretches from the back of the head all the way to the tail tip. Compared with normal ball pythons, Enchies are more vivid and have orange-tinted sides with a rounded pattern on the back of their head that shows blushing. This morph is known known for its dark, dusky black and shadowy gray base colors .

They tend to be a rich brownish-red color and have bronze rings outlined in black shadow. Supers are a solid, dark brownish-red that fades with age to take on a more cocoa color or even a dusky gray-brown. Because they fade to a cocoa color these morphs are also called black ball pythons.

These snakes typically have a lavender base color with a well-defined, bright yellow pattern and red eyes. Most have a very high color contrast and sharp clarity in their pattern that makes them very valuable. Lesser Ball Pythons have a dark brown, blushed-out base color that lightens towards the belly.

This morph was truly unique at creation, however they are now easy to breed and have a very similar appearance and color intensity. The Black-Backed ball pythons origin is unknown , they are likely a wild caught snake. Yet, unlike normal varieties, these have a thick, unbroken stripe of concentrated pigment running down their spines.

This dominant gene is known to be passed on to around half of its offspring, however, it has yet to be isolated for selective breeding. They were first isolated in 2001 when careful breeding determined they possess codominant genes. It can take several generations and a bit of luck to obtain Blue-Eyed Lucies from pure Butters!

These ball pythons typically have a light brown or tan base color with a thick stripe along the spine. They tend to have golden yellow keyhole patterns with dark brown or black centers and outlines. A beautiful array of brown shades define the Vanilla ball python, but it can affect their offspring differently.

The codominant gene takes a normal pattern and brightens with a blushed-out brown base and a faded head. Created in 2005, the Mystic ball python is a very rare morph and becomes increasingly unique with age. The keyhole blotch pattern often takes on a bronze-orange to gold color and has little to no alien head shapes.

Their head tends to be very dark with no blushing and the morph only occasionally leads into a pinstripe. The melanin production in the scales increased and the black pattern started overtaking the white portions of the snake. Called the darkness gene, the Stormtroopers genetics have yet to be successfully reproduced and therefore cannot be sold.

Ivory ball pythons are bred from double recessive Yellow Bellies. Sometimes Ivory pythons occasionally have bright yellow and black patches on their heads. Hypomelanism is a recessive trait that causes reduced melanin pigmentation (e.g. brown, black, red, orange colored scales).

They are recognized by their dark lavender base coloration with bright orange blotches. Each of these blotches fades to a yellow color along the edge giving the illusion that the spots are glowing. Some Coral Glow morphs resemble Banana ball pythons as they can have dark specks along their body.

Also called the Puma, the Champagne morph is one of the most unique patterns of any snake in this list. They tend to be anywhere from tan to dark brown in color with a light stripe down their spine. They can brighten and/or reduce patterns when mixed with other morphs which makes them valuable to breeders.

The patterns blotches tend to have a deep red undertone but otherwise appear normal. This Ball Python is popular with breeders because it brings out copper and red hues in other morph patterns. The base color can be bright yellow to sunset orange with a lighter, pattern less pinstripe along the spine.

The Highway pattern is an incredible designer morph created by crossing a Gravel with a Yellow Belly . Regardless of color, all Highways have a yellow, broken stripe pattern along their spine similar. Dreamsicles are highly complex designer ball pythons that require 2-4 generations of breeding to ultimately achieve an Albino-Lavender and Piebald mix.

All three ( Albino, Lavender and Piebald ) of these genes are recessive, making the morph even harder to produce, though the coloration is well worth it to many breeders. Each blotch is bright orange and well defined, often containing small spots of white as well, a trait not usually observed in normal Piebalds. They have a clean, yellowish tint on their bellies and a speckled pattern bordering their scutes.

This morph is named for their banding pattern because it mimics the Woma Python . The Phantom ball python possesses a gene that is extremely close, if not the same, as the one that causes the Mystic morph . Most of these snakes have a black base color that fades to tan as it approaches a white belly.

They are a designer ball python meaning they possess such rare mutations that have an almost 0% chance of occurring in the wild. They have a light pink or lavender base color and a bright yellow blotched pattern. Chocolate ball pythons are a basic morph with codominant tendencies.

They also have solid caramel spots along their spines, and their heads appear relatively normal in color and pattern. The Spotnoses gene only affects the head pattern and facial colors when bred with other morphs, but otherwise has little effect on offspring. Candy balls are hatched looking albino, but quickly begin to wash out in color.

They start to take on dark lavender, gray, and beige base colors while keeping the bright yellow patterning. An interesting fact about Candies is that though they possess recessive genes, they display codominant patterns with Albino and Toffee morphs. Tigers are a light yellow color that fades to an orange hue along the sides.

They have dark brown bands across their back with spots and shorter horizontal stripes throughout the pattern. They also have dark heads and noses with lighter portions along the sides of the face and the mouth. The beautiful Super Blast receives lot of attention from Ball Python fans.

Their face has dark spotting which is an odd trait considering the lighter color of the rest of the body. These snakes are born to standard Ball Python parents but display a small spot or ring of white near the end of their tail. This small amount of white is called a ringer and breeders use them to find snakes that may carry the recessive Pied gene.

The pattern of inheritance is unknown and having a Ringer doesnt always mean the snake will produce Piebald offspring. Blue-Eyed Leucistics are pure white with blue eyes and are extremely rare to find . They are typically bred from up to five different morphs (Mojave, Lesser, Butter, Russo, and Phantom) and can take 2-4 generations to be produced.

Even after breeding five generations, the odds of some hatchlings being perfect Blue-Eyed Leucistics is unpredictable at best (no clutch is yet to exceed a 25% success rate). Most Blue-Eyed Lucy morphs have faint yellow dorsal stripes, making them slightly less desirable than their counterparts. Unlike other leucistic or albino snakes, their bright eyes experience no excessive light sensitivity.

These snakes have a dark brownish-black base color that fades to white along the sides of the belly. Their pattern is similar to a Bongo with reduced markings along the spine and alien-head blotches along the sides with black centers. The Pastel gene, however, increases the contrast by turning the blotches into bright yellow shapes outlined by sections of blushing base colors.

This Ball Python also has patterns of deep orange-brown blotching filled with black spots and specks. Towards the belly, the base color begins to blush or fade in between blotches, and silver flaming can be observed as a lining along the lower edges. Native to Africa, the Ghi python takes well to captivity and can be purchased for $100.

Ball Python Morphs are bred to be a variety of unique colors and patterns from beautiful alien spots to a completely white body.

The ball python is a common and popular snake. It is a manageable size, tends to have a decent friendly or even temperament, and there is a huge range of morphs available, which means you can get the look and style of snake that appeals to you.

Although new, this morph has increased in popularity and you may have to pay upwards of $1,000 for an Acid Ball Python. Image Credit: Oom Chaowanapreecha, Shutterstock Albino morphs are well known for their yellow and white scales, as well as their pink eyes.

Image Credit: Deb Davis, ShutterstockThe first example of a Banana morph sold for $25,000 in 2003. Credit: Kaorte, Creative CommonsThe Black Pastel morph has a gray-black base with standard ball python spots. Image Credit: Akekanick Pansang, ShutterstockThe Blue-Eyed Lucy is not quite as rare as the Blue-Eyed Leucistic and they arent truly albino.

Image Credit: bluedog studio, ShutterstockThe Butter Ball Python has yellow and caramel scales. You wont find this type of snake in the wild and will have to pay around $400 for a good example of this designer morph. The Champagne , or Puma, morph is unusual because it lacks traditional markings and is colored somewhere between light and dark brown with a stripe down its spine.

Image Credit: fivespots, ShutterstockDiscovered in 1999, the Clown Ball Python , so-called because the first discovered example had a teardrop shape marking under its eye, is tan and brown with copper. Image Credit: Miiko, Shutterstock Coral Glows , or White Smokes, have bright orange blotches on a dark lavender base. The inexpensive Enchi morph is available for $100 or less and has orange sides with blushing on their head pattern.

Image Credit: Taylor Kapuy, ShutterstockThe Ghi Ball Python has a light belly and a black base color over its back. Image Credit: Edwini9, ShutterstockBred from two Yellow Bellies, the Ivorys appearance is somewhat unpredictable. Those with a clear contrast in their pattern tend to cost more, and a Lavender Albino will normally set you back around $400.

Image Credit: Edwini9, ShutterstockThe Lemon Blast costs $200 and combines a Pastel and Pinstripe. Image Credit: Deb Davis, Shutterstock The Lesser is a cheap morph, costing around $100, although you pay a little more for a more unusual pattern. Image Credit: Hand Robot, ShutterstockThe Mojave is one of the most recognizable of all ball python morphs.

The Pastel is a basic morph and has a normal pattern but they have a unique pale green eye color. Image Credit: fivespots, Shutterstock Pewter is a designer morph, which means that it is not found in the wild. Image Credit: Oom Chaowanapreecha, ShutterstockThe Piebald is a highly recognizable ball python morph.

Image Credit: Deb Davis, ShutterstockThe Pinstripe is a popular morph. Combining the Mojave and Phantom morphs has given light to the Purple Passion markings with a lavender body and patternless sides. It can bring out the red in other morphs so is popular with breeders and is usually available for $100 for a good example.

The Ringer is usually used by breeders because it can expose snakes that carry the Pied gene, which is one of the most popular of all morphs. Image Credit: fivespots, ShutterstockThe Spider morph has a brown base and dark bands and spots. Over time, the black pattern overtook the white base, but the effect has never been repeated, which means that this morph is not available for purchase.

Image Credit: fivespots, ShutterstockThe Desert Enchi, or Tiger , morph is a light yellow and orange base. Commonly used by breeders for their ability to bring out the colors in other genes, the Vanilla morph has a blushed brown base and faded head, as well as normal patterns, and costs $100. Credit: PetlinDmitry, ShutterstockThe White Ball Python is, as the name suggests, a pigmentless snake with no pigmented scales.

Oliver (Ollie) Jones A zoologist and freelance writer living in South Australia with his partner Alex, their dog Pepper, and their cat Steve (who declined to be pictured). Ollie, originally from the USA, holds his masters degree in wildlife biology and moved to Australia to pursue his career and passion but has found a new love for working online and writing about animals of all types.

At the beginning of the 1990s, the ball python (Python regius) was a snake that everyone in town danced with, but no one wanted to take to the prom. Despite their perfect size and temperament, attractive colors and pattern, they were inexpensive and common snakes. Nearly everyone started out with ball pythons and boa constrictors as their first exotic, tropical snakes, but the roving eyes of young snake keepers would nearly always begin to look at other snakes that seemed more worthy of their lusting obsessions. It’s interesting now to see how at the end of the 1990s, ball pythons have become one of the most high profile and popular snakes in all of herpetoculture. It’s like looking back and suddenly realizing that the kid next door who you snubbed has grown up to become an international super model.

Since then, every single one of the tens of thousands of ball pythons that are annually imported has been carefully scrutinized to see if it’s different, if it has some additional market value because of some quirk of pattern or color unique to that snake. Of course, the fact that ball pythons were then inexpensive imports, as they are today, also retarded any serious attempts at establishing breeding projects for this species.

If, in fact, the captive breeding of normal-colored ball pythons does have any real value to science, conservation or to American small business, this anomaly of international trade someday must be corrected. On each side, spaced along the length of the neck and body, are 15 to 25 large, pale, rounded blotches, usually open on the bottom, connected with and shading to the paler belly coloration. Wild-caught normal-colored ball pythons with beautiful pale vertebral stripes from head to tail have been bred together to produce clutches of normally patterned offspring.

The pale pattern elements are yellow or yellow-gold and are without any of the fine stippling of tiny melanin dots that darken the overall appearance of normal ball pythons. It’s always seemed to us that black ball pythons are smaller snakes with large eyes, and we were hopeful that this melanistic appearance would be a simple recessive trait due to a single mutation. We have heard that two high-gold adults bred together produce high-gold babies, so it can be said to be an inheritable condition, a polygenetic character or perhaps a simple recessive trait.

Description[edit]

The ball python is black or dark brown with light brown blotches on the back and sides. Its white or cream belly is scattered with black markings. It is a stocky snake with a relatively small head and smooth scales.

Distribution and habitat[edit]

The ball python is native to west Sub Saharan Africa from Senegal, Mali, Guinea-Bissau, Guinea, Sierra Leone, Liberia, Ivory Coast, Ghana, Benin, and Nigeria through Cameroon, Chad, and the Central African Republic to Sudan and Uganda.

Behavior and ecology[edit]

This species is known for its defense strategy that involves coiling into a tight ball when threatened, with its head and neck tucked away in the middle. This defense behavior is typically employed in lieu of biting, which makes this species easy for humans to handle and has contributed to their popularity as a pet.In the wild, ball pythons favor mammal burrows and other underground hiding places, where they also aestivate. Males tend to display more semi-arboreal behaviors, whilst females tend towards terrestrial behaviors.

Diet[edit]

The diet of the ball python in the wild consists mostly of small mammals and birds. Young ball pythons of less than 70 cm (28 in) prey foremost on small birds. Ball pythons longer than 100 cm (39 in) prey foremost on small mammals. Males prey more frequently on birds, and females more frequently on mammals.

Reproduction[edit]

Females are oviparous and lay three to 11 rather large, leathery eggs.

Threats[edit]

The ball python is primarily threatened by poaching for the international exotic pet trade. It is also hunted for its skin, meat and use in traditional medicine. Other threats include habitat loss as a result of intensified agriculture and pesticide use.

Conservation[edit]

The Ball python is listed as Near Threatened on the IUCN Red List as it experiences a high level of exploitation so that the population has probably declined in most of West Africa.

In captivity[edit]

Wild-caught specimens have greater difficulty adapting to a captive environment, which can result in refusal to feed, and they generally carry internal or external parasites. Specimens have survived for up to 60 years in captivity, with the oldest recorded ball python being kept in captivity 62 years, 59 of those at the Saint Louis Zoo.Most captive ball pythons accept common rats and mice, and some eat birds, such as chicken and quail.

Breeding[edit]

Ball pythons are one of the most common reptiles bred in captivity. They usually are able to produce a clutch of six eggs on average, but clutch sizes also range from one to eleven. These snakes usually lay one clutch per year and the eggs hatch around sixty days later. Usually, these eggs are artificially incubated in a captive environment at temperatures between 88–90 degrees Fahrenheit. Some captive breeders use ultra-sounding technology to verify the progress of reproductive development. This can help to increase the chances of successful fertilization as the ultra-sound can help predict the best times to introduce males and females during the breeding season.In captivity, ball pythons are often bred for specific patterns, or morphs.

In culture[edit]

The ball python is particularly revered by the Igbo people in southeastern Nigeria, who consider it symbolic of the earth, being an animal that travels so close to the ground. Even Christian Igbos treat ball pythons with great care whenever they come across one in a village or on someone’s property; they either let them roam or pick them up gently and return them to a forest or field away from houses. If one is accidentally killed, many communities on Igbo land still build a coffin for the snake’s remains and give it a short funeral.

Top 50 Ball Python Morphs

Ball Python Morphs are Ball Python snakes that have been selectively bred for a specific color or pattern appearance.Morphs are bred by specialized snake breeders who try to isolate mutations found naturally in the wild. They use selective breeding to produce especially vivid and interesting color variations.The genes that make up ball python morphs are passed on through inheritance – just like with humans. That is why genes can be dominant, recessive, or codominant. Breeders look to exploit these three genes to produce different morphs:Below is a list of key terms you should get to know before exploring our list of Ball Python Morphs:

Spider

The Spider morph entered the market in 1999 as a unique dominating gene.Spider morphs haveThey have thin, dark banding and spots along their bodies and distinct black markings on their head and face.Ranked as the most popular morph, these snakes are in high demand and can be purchased for $150.

Banana

Banana ball pythons possess a codominant gene first revealed in a clutch in 2003.The first snake from that clutch was sold for $25,000!Since then, breeders have been producing these incredible morphs for enthusiasts.They have strong yellow colored blotches and spots against a tan base color. Sometimes they have dark freckles across their faded yellow bodies.Banana balls sell for $150-$250, depending on gender and pattern.

Albino

Hatched in 1992, the Albino ball python was the first-ever recessive morph.Albinism means the snake is “amelanistic” and is not able to produce brown, black, red, or orange pigments in its scales. That is why Albinos areAlbinos are loved for their high contrast patterns that typically fade out to various shades of yellow.As the first affordable recessive morph, you will find them on sale for $250-$400, depending on their age and contrast level.

Piebald

The Piebald is one of the most easily recognizable morphs.First bred in 1997, the Piebald’s variable patterns are caused by a recessive gene.They always have a white base with patches of color that are filled with erratic patterns. The ratio of white to colored patches seems somewhat random too, though almost all Piebalds have a normal head.Most Pieds can be purchased for $300-$400 depending on the amount of white present in the pattern.

Pastel (Super Pastel)

The Pastel is a basic morph that was first named the “Pastel Jungle” in 1997.These snakes have a normal pattern with aYou can purchase a Pastel for $75.When two Pastel morphs are bred, a totally different snake is produced.Super Pastels have a reduced, yellow pattern with a purplish-blushing color often called “Purple Haze.” They have an erratic pattern with some banding and more “keyhole” blotching.Expect to pay $150 for a Super Pastel.

Axanthic

Axanthic ball pythons lack red and yellow pigments in their scales (This leaves the Axanthic with varying gray, black, white, brown, and silver colors.They have a high contrast normal pattern that tends to turn brown with age.Since the recessive trait was discovered in 1997, these snakes have been sold to breeders around the world to create more morph variations.You can buy an Axanthic for $225.

Mojave

Another one of the most recognizable morphs, the Mojave was first bred in 2000. They are used for their gene codominance to produce incredible patterns – like the Blue-Eyed Lucy.This Ball Python typically has a base color of dark brown to bluish-black.Their pattern is a combination of deep browns and vibrant yellows with cream-colored flaming.The “Mojave Pattern” is similar to the normal alien-head but has flaming and contains only a single small keyhole mark.

White

The White ball python was first discovered in 2007 by accident.Interestingly, the first snake was discovered accidentally in a clutch that hatched on the breeder’s wedding day, hence the name “White Wedding.”White Wedding pythons are considered the cleanest of all the leucistic patterns. They have no pigmented scales but retain the standard dark eyes.Since 2007, these snakes have been successfully reproduced and can be purchased for $650.

Scaleless

The Scaleless is the most unusual of all the morphs in this list.Scaleless ball pythons were first bred in 2013 from Scaleless-Head morphs.As their name suggests, have skin instead of scales. The amount of scales they have can vary from totally scaleless to just a few skin patches, but all of them have belly scales. Without belly scales, called scutes, they would be unable to move across the ground.You can bring one of these scaleless snakes into your home for $2500.

Sunset

The Sunset is an unusual morph that was first bred in captivity in 2012 from a basic morph.This deep auburn-red snake has copper colored spotting and a dark red head. They are completely unique and unlike any other morph in this list.As the gene is now consistently reproduced, the price for this snake has dropped to $1000-$1500.

Bumblebee

The Bumblebee ball is a very intricately patterned snake bred from the Pastel and Spider genes.They are mostly tan-yellow with thin black spots and stripes and varied specks of white. The brightest yellow morphs are called “Killer Bees” and retain their color into adulthood, unlike most snakes that fade with age.Many keepers love Bumblebees for their gorgeous patterns.Some breeders use the Bumblebees to provide more vivid colors in other morphs.Darker variations of tan-yellow are $175, but a Killer Bee costs $450 depending on the level of contrast.

Clown

Clown ball pythons possess a recessive mutation that affects both their color and pattern.They are normally tan and brown with copper undertones that fade towards their belly and mellow with age.This morph also has a reduced pattern with a dark, wide dorsal stripe.The Clown has a unique head with a complex pattern of light and dark shades.Interestingly, this snake is known as the Clown because the first one found had a teardrop-like spot underneath its eye.Since their discovery in 1999 they have been called Clowns and are sold for $200.

Fire (Super Fire)

In 1995 the first Fire morph was bred. They are a mix of codominant genes that create a coffee-brown snake with a thick, tan banding pattern.You can purchase a Fire for around $100, however a Super Fire can be as high as $400.When mated together, the codominant gene causes colors to be “fired up” and a Super Fire is born.The first Super Fire was bred in 2002.Super Fires are commonly known as Black-Eyed Leucistic pythons and are white with various shades of yellow spots along their spine with red pupils.

Pinstripe

First named in 2001, the Pinstripe morph is loved by many snake owners for the dominant stripe along their spine.Pinstripes are popular with breeders because they are frequently used to mate with other morphs to reduce patterns and create a more pronounced spine.For $100 you can purchase a Pinstripe.These snakes are typically a light brown to copper color with a thick, patternless stripe that stretches from the back of the head all the way to the tail tip.They also have thin stripes perpendicular to the pinstripe with some light-colored flaming.

Enchi

The Enchi morph was first found as a breeding pair in Ghana, Africa in 2002.A standard Enchi can normally be purchased for $80-$100.Compared with normal ball pythons, Enchies are more vivid and have orange-tinted sides with a rounded pattern on the back of their head that shows blushing.Their genes are codominant when bred to other morphs – so the patterns of their offspring are more defined.In a hatchling, the color difference is almost too subtle to notice, but it will intensify with age.

Purple Passion

The Purple Passion morph is the result of a codominant gene produced by mating the Mojave and Phantom morphs.They were first bred in 2007 and sell for $400.Purple Passions have lavender-pink bodies with patternless sides.They also have a light, off-white striping down the spine with dark-colored eyes. Their lavender-pink bodies vary in intensity, and some have circular spots with keyholes, though that is uncommon.

Black Pastel (Super Black Pastel)

The Black Pastel morph was first bred in 2002. After the first clutch was born, it was determined that the morph is a codominant gene.They are currently being sold for between $150-$200.This morph is knownThese snakes have a completely unmarked belly.Breeding two Black Pastels produces a Super Black Pastel, which can be solid black or dark with some visible patterning.Super Black Pastels are typically high contrast snakes with rusty colored blotches and a black base.

Cinnamon (Super Cinnamon)

Cinnamons were first discovered in 2002 and are the result of basic codominant genetics.They tend to be a rich brownish-red color and have bronze rings outlined in black shadow.The average Cinnamon ball is normally $75, however, a Super Cinnamon is far more expensive costing $450.When two Cinnamons are crossed, a Super Cinnamon is hatched.Supers are a solid, dark brownish-red that fades with age to take on a more cocoa color or even a dusky gray-brown. They are completely patternless with a light, unmarked belly.Because they fade to a cocoa color these morphs are also called black ball pythons.

Lavender Albino

The Lavender Albino morph was first discovered in 2001 and sold for $40,000!This basic morph is a combination of recessive Albino and Lavender traits. They are a color mutation.These snakes typically have a lavender base color with a well-defined, bright yellow pattern and red eyes.Most have a very high color contrast and sharp clarity in their pattern that makes them very valuable.Now that breeders can consistently produce this morph they sell for $400.

Lesser

The Lesser is a basic morph that takes on a codominant role when bred. The first Lesser was bred in 2001 and sold for $30,000.Lesser Ball Pythons have a dark brown, blushed-out base color that lightens towards the belly. They have light yellow spots along the sides and spines with almost no spots or disruptions within the balloon-splotches.Their head appears normal, just slightly lighter brown.This morph was truly unique at creation, however they are now easy to breed and have a very similar appearance and color intensity. This makes them one of the cheaper morphs on this list at $125.

Black (Black-Backed)

These snakes have an almost normal pattern. Yet, unlike normal varieties, these have a thick, unbroken stripe of concentrated pigment running down their spines.This dominant gene is known to be passed on to around half of its offspring, however, it has yet to be isolated for selective breeding.Without knowing the gene, these snakes are known as “super normal” and only cost $50-$100.

Butter

The Butter ball is a calmer variation of the yellow morphs that costs $100.It is a basic mutation that causes soft, creamy-yellow markings highlighted by a caramel-brown.Their mellow colors descend directly from the wild.They were first isolated in 2001 when careful breeding determined they possess codominant genes. Two Butters bred together to create Super Butters.Some of the Supers are pale yellows, but others are actually Blue-Eyed Lucies. It can take several generations and a bit of luck to obtain Blue-Eyed Lucies from pure Butters!

Pewter

The Pewter morph is an interesting combination of the codominant Pastel and Cinnamon genes.These ball pythons typically have a light brown or tan base color with a thick stripe along the spine. They tend to have golden yellow keyhole patterns with dark brown or black centers and outlines. Some may have spots or more erratic patterning.
This designer morph was first bred in 2003 and can be purchased for $200.

Vanilla

Despite what their name suggests, this snake is not Vanilla!A beautiful array of brown shades define the Vanilla ball python, but it can affect their offspring differently. Vanillas bring out vibrant colors in other morphs so they are commonly used by breeders. Because of their popularity with breeders this morph costs $100.The codominant gene takes a normal pattern and brightens with a blushed-out brown base and a faded head.Vanillas also have a light belly color.

Mystic

Created in 2005, the Mystic ball python is a very rare morph and becomes increasingly unique with age. They are all first born with a dark brown-black base that fades to a tan color towards the belly. They often become a purplish-gray color with age.This pattern is typically compared to a Mojave but lacks the distinct flaming pattern.The keyhole blotch pattern often takes on a bronze-orange to gold color and has little to no alien head shapes. Their head tends to be very dark with no blushing and the morph only occasionally leads into a pinstripe.If the idea of a color-changing snake interests you, you can buy a Mystic morph for $150.

Stormtrooper

The Stormtrooper was an accidental morph bred in 2015.It was intended to be an Axanthic x Pastel snake (a fairly common morph) but a mostly white snake with gray and black markings was produced.Over time, the Stormtrooper experienced a “darkening” event. The melanin production in the scales increased and the black pattern started overtaking the white portions of the snake.Called the “darkness” gene, the Stormtrooper’s genetics have yet to be successfully reproduced and therefore cannot be sold.

Ivory

Ivory ball pythons are bred from double recessive Yellow Bellies.These designer morphs are a patternless, pinkish-white color. They have a thin yellow stripe down their spine and jet black eyes.Their heads, however, exhibit a dark lavender-gray blushing coloration. Sometimes Ivory pythons occasionally have bright yellow and black patches on their heads.Though extremely unique and variable, they only cost between $200-$300.

Ghost

The Ghost gene is a snake with reduced pigmentation. This is known as a hypomelanistic coloration and it is the most commonly observed mutation.Hypomelanism is a recessive trait that causes reduced melanin pigmentation (e.g. brown, black, red, orange colored scales).Ghost morphs have a normal pattern but are paler in color. They are lighter tans, yellows, and even have gray flaming along the sides of the spots at the belly side.While the pattern is simple, this $100 morph can produce extraordinary clutches.

Coral Glow

Coral Glows were first named in 2002 but are also known as White Smokes.They are one of theThey are recognized by their dark lavender base coloration with bright orange blotches. Each of these blotches fades to a yellow color along the edge giving the illusion that the spots are glowing.Some Coral Glow morphs resemble Banana ball pythons as they can have dark specks along their body.Despite being available for over 18 years these morphs still cost $250 or more.

Champagne (Puma)

Also called the Puma, the Champagne morph is one of the most unique patterns of any snake in this list.They tend to be anywhere from tan to dark brown in color with a light stripe down their spine. Other than their color gradient, these snakes lack any real pattern.Because of their unique pattern they are often bred to create variations of patternless morphs. They can brighten and/or reduce patterns when mixed with other morphs which makes them valuable to breeders.First bred in 2005 Champagnes are fairly common and cost $200.

Red

The Red gene is a basic, dominant trait that affects color alone. The pattern’s blotches tend to have a deep red undertone but otherwise appear normal.This Ball Python is popular with breeders because it brings out copper and red hues in other morph patterns. It can also intensify color contrasts with darker morphs.

Lemon Blast

The 2003 Lemon Blast is a clever mix of the codominant Pastel and dominant Pinstripe genes.This designer morph tends to have fine-lined, complex linear patterns of dark brown and black colors, sometimes with flecks of color scattered around the body.The base color can be bright yellow to sunset orange with a lighter, pattern less pinstripe along the spine.This snake is valued for its unique pattern and costs $200 from most breeders.

Highway

The Highway pattern is an incredible designer morph created by crossing a Gravel with a Yellow Belly.Most Highways have a base color of copper-brown to gray-brown, though some can take on a more pastel yellow color. Some are solidly colored along the body and others can have small rings.Regardless of color, all Highways have a yellow, broken stripe pattern along their spine similar. Some stripes may have a dark shadow around them, emphasizing the bright pattern.The higher the contrast in the morph, the higher the price. Most are priced between $550 and $650.

Dreamsicle

Dreamsicles are highly complex designer ball pythons that require 2-4 generations of breeding to ultimately achieve an Albino-Lavender and Piebald mix.All three (These snakes are often white or pinkish in color with “pattern-clouds” scattered randomly along their body.Each blotch is bright orange and well defined, often containing small spots of white as well, a trait not usually observed in normal Piebalds.They have been

Yellow Belly

The Yellow Belly was first proven in 2003 and is bred from a basic codominant gene.Yellow Bellies are known for their ability to intensify the color of other morphs when bred together.They have onlyDue to their similar appearance, they cost around $50.Some Yellow Belly morphs have blushing or flaming along the belly, but this isn’t as common.

Phantom

The Woma is a basic, dominant gene that was first produced in 1999.This morph is named for their banding pattern because it mimics the Woma Python.These snakes have brown sides that gradually lighten towards the spine. Their heads are dark with mild blushing and yellow upper lips. They also have dark bands across their bodies that become thinner towards the belly.This morph is difficult to breed for two main reasons:Despite the breeding issues that may occur with this morph they can be purchased for $250.

Candino

The “Candino” is a mix of the recessive Albino and Candy genes created in 2012.They are a designer ball python meaning they possess such rare mutations that haveThey have a light pink or lavender base color and a bright yellow blotched pattern. There is a slight fading around the blotches, highlighting them for a truly spectacular appearance.To purchase a Candino you should expect to pay $325 or more.

Chocolate

Chocolate ball pythons are a basic morph with codominant tendencies.Recognized as a genetic variant in 1999 these snakes have been consistently popular costing around $100. However, a more intense color pattern may cost as much as $250.They have dark chocolate-brown base colors with caramel colored keyhole and alien head spots.Most of the spots have dark centers that are balloon shaped. They also have solid caramel spots along their spines, and their heads appear relatively normal in color and pattern.

Spotnose

The Spotnose was first bred in 2005 from a codominant gene.This morph is named after the prominent circular spots on either side of their nostrils.When compared with normal variations these snakes have more alien head shapes and have a faded light brown spotting pattern on their head with a dark background.The Spotnose’s gene only affects the head pattern and facial colors when bred with other morphs, but otherwise has little effect on offspring.A Spotnose can be purchased for $150.

Candy

The Candy ball Python was first recognized in 2009.They are truly interesting because of their drastic color changes that occur as they age. They are one of few morphs thatCandy balls are hatched looking albino, but quickly begin to wash out in color. They start to take on dark lavender, gray, and beige base colors while keeping the bright yellow patterning.An interesting fact about Candies is that though they possess recessive genes, they display codominant patterns with Albino and Toffee morphs.Candy and Toffee morphs were caught from the same bush in Africa, stemming controversy about the legitimacy of their morph separation.

Tiger

The Tiger is also known as the Desert Enchi.The origin of this morph is unknown but they are a designer morph bred by combing a dominant Desert gene with a codominant Enchi gene. Tigers are a light yellow color that fades to an orange hue along the sides.They have dark brown bands across their back with spots and shorter horizontal stripes throughout the pattern. They also have dark heads and noses with lighter portions along the sides of the face and the mouth.Depending on the intensity of the color and pattern, a tiger morph can be purchased from $200 to $400.

Super Blast

The Super Blast is a designer pattern produced by combing a Super Pastel snake with a Pinstripe (The beautiful Super Blast receives lot of attention from Ball Python fans. Because of their fanfare they currently cost $425.These snakes are a hazy, bright pastel yellow color. They have thin, faded black vertical lines along the sides of a light-striped spine.Their face has dark spotting which is an odd trait considering the lighter color of the rest of the body.

Acid

The Acid is a new morph that was introduced in 2015.Since 2015 they have remained especially popular with breeders who have beenAcid ball pythons have a dark brown or black base color with golden brown spots resembling a broken up normal pattern. Their most interesting feature is their intricately patterned belly. It is yellowish with a black zipper-like line along the entire snake.The dominant gene responsible for their pattern is one of very few that can overtake an Ivory gene. It’s also known to “shatter” the patterns of any morph it is bred to.

Ringer

Ringers are an interesting anomaly found within the world of morph breeding.They have normal or specific morph patterns and colors, but are roughly 5% Pied (These snakes are born to standard Ball Python parents but display a small spot or ring of white near the end of their tail. This small amount of white is called a “ringer” and breeders use them to find snakes that may carry the recessive Pied gene.The pattern of inheritance is unknown and having a Ringer doesn’t always mean the snake will produce Piebald offspring.

Blue-Eyed Leucistic

Blue-Eyed Leucistics are pure white with blue eyes and areThey are typically bred from up to five different morphs (Mojave, Lesser, Butter, Russo, and Phantom) and can take 2-4 generations to be produced.Even after breeding five generations, the odds of some hatchlings being perfect Blue-Eyed Leucistics is unpredictable at best (no clutch is yet to exceed a 25% success rate).This difficulty in breeding this snake is the main reason they are sold for $800 to $1,000.

Fire Ivory (Fire Super Yellow Belly)

Also known as a “Fire Super Yellow Belly,” the Fire Ivory was first bred from Fire and Ivory morphs in 2012.These snakes cost $375 and are truly unique in appearance.Ivory ball pythons are a product of two codominant Yellow Belly morphs, making the Fire Ivory a combination of three genes.They have a pink-lavender base color with gray blushing making them look dirty.They are

Blue-Eyed Lucy

The Blue-Eyed Lucies is another morph with the Blue-Eyed Leucistics complex.This snake is bred from Mojave and Lesser morphs.Most Blue-Eyed Lucy morphs have faint yellow dorsal stripes, making them slightly less desirable than their counterparts. However, these snakes still sell for $700.Unlike other leucistic or albino snakes, their bright eyes experience no excessive light sensitivity.

Bongo Pastel

This morph was first bred in 2012 by mating a Bongo with a Pastel morph.These snakes have a dark brownish-black base color that fades to white along the sides of the belly. Their pattern is similar to a Bongo with reduced markings along the spine and “alien-head” blotches along the sides with black centers.The Pastel gene, however, increases the contrast by turning the blotches into bright yellow shapes outlined by sections of blushing base colors.This brightly contrasted snake can be purchased for $300-$500 depending on the quality of the coloration.

Ghi Ball Python

Another example of codominant genetics, the Ghi ball python was first discovered in 2007.They Ghi has a patternless light colored belly and a black base color over their back.This Ball Python also has patterns of deep orange-brown blotching filled with black spots and specks. Towards the belly, the base color begins to blush or fade in between blotches, and silver flaming can be observed as a lining along the lower edges.Native to Africa, the Ghi python takes well to captivity and can be purchased for $100.

Acid Ball Python Morph

The Acid Ball Python has only been known since 2015. They have a dark brown or black base with golden brown spots. They have a yellow belly and a black zipper. Although new, this morph has increased in popularity and you may have to pay upwards of $1,000 for an Acid Ball Python.

Albino Ball Python Morph

Albino morphs are well known for their yellow and white scales, as well as their pink eyes. They are rare because this morph only occurs when both parents carry the gene. They cost around $400.

Axanthic Ball Python Morph

The Axanthic morph is a recessive morph whereby the snake has the same markings as a traditional ball python but consists of shades of silver, black, and white. Expect to pay around $200 for this morph.

Banana Ball Python Morph

The first example of a Banana morph sold for $25,000 in 2003. While they have become even more popular since then, they are also more readily available. This morph, with its tan base and yellow blotches, now costs around $200.

Black Ball Python

The Black Ball Python is an affordable morph, costing no more than $100, and looks very similar to a standard ball python except that he has a single black line running parallel to his spine.

Black Pastel Ball Python

The Black Pastel morph has a gray-black base with standard ball python spots. It is a relatively easy morph to find, and you shouldn’t have to pay more than $200 for one of these snakes.

Blue-Eyed Leucistic Ball Python Morph

Leucistic Ball Pythons lack any pigmentation, and it can take five or more generations of selective breeding to achieve a Blue-Eyed Leucistic Ball Python. This difficulty means that you can expect to pay $1,000 for a BEL Ball Python.

Blue-Eyed Lucy

The Blue-Eyed Lucy is not quite as rare as the Blue-Eyed Leucistic and they aren’t truly albino. One will set you back around $700, and they are easier to locate than the aforementioned morphs.

Bongo Pastel

The Bongo Pastel combines a Bongo morph with that of a Pastel morph. These snakes are purple when they hatch and have blushing on the back of the head, thanks to the pastel morph. Set aside $400 for a Bongo Pastel Ball Python.

Bumblebee

The Bumblebee is not a naturally occurring Python morph and can only be created by breeding a Spider with a Pastel, resulting in the yellow and black scales that give this morph its name. A regular Bumblebee morph costs $200, while the brighter yellow Killer Bee costs $500.

Butter

The Butter Ball Python has yellow and caramel scales. This is an affordable morph, and you can pick up a good example of this kind of ball for around $100.

Candino

The Candino combines the Albino morph with the Candy morph and results in a snake with yellow blotches and a lavender base. You won’t find this type of snake in the wild and will have to pay around $400 for a good example of this designer morph.

Candy

Candy morphs are very unusual. They start out albino at birth and get darker as they get older. Created in 2009, this is one of the newer ball pythons and you will pay $300 for one.

Champagne

The Champagne, or Puma, morph is unusual because it lacks traditional markings and is colored somewhere between light and dark brown with a stripe down its spine. Although this morph is quite new, having been bred in 2005, they are available for around $200.

Chocolate

Costing around $100, the popular Chocolate morph has a dark, chocolate color base, with caramel-colored keyhole spots. They are quite a common morph and were recognized as a distinct genetic variant in 1999.

Cinnamon

The Cinnamon Ball Python is a common morph that will cost less than $100 but the Super Cinnamon, which is created by crossing two Cinnamons, will set you back around $400. Super Cinnamon Ball Pythons are a dark cinnamon color with no markings, and their color fades with age.

Clown

Discovered in 1999, the Clown Ball Python, so-called because the first discovered example had a teardrop shape marking under its eye, is tan and brown with copper. They have a reduced pattern with a wide stripe.

Coral Glow

Coral Glows, or White Smokes, have bright orange blotches on a dark lavender base. The blotches have a yellow edge which gives them the appearance of glowing, hence the name Coral Glow. These morphs cost $250.

Dreamsicle

The Dreamicle can take four generations of breeding. They combine an Albino-Lavender and Piebald, and they are white or pink with orange clouds on their body. Expect to pay more than $2,500 for this rare morph.

Enchi

The inexpensive Enchi morph is available for $100 or less and has orange sides with blushing on their head pattern. It can be difficult to recognize this morph when they hatch, but the difference will become increasingly evident as they age.

Fire

The Fire Ball Python will cost $100 while the Super Fire, which is bred by combining two Fire Balls and commonly referred to as a Black-Eyed Leucistic Python, will cost you $400.

Fire Ivory

Costing around $400 and having a truly unique appearance with lavender base and gray blushing, the Fire Ivory, which is properly known as the Fire Super Yellow Belly, has a yellow stripe along its spine.

Ghi Ball Python

The Ghi Ball Python has a light belly and a black base color over its back. They were first discovered in 2007 and are relatively inexpensive morphs, costing approximately $100 each.

Ghost

The Ghost morph has reduced pigmentation. This is a commonly seen mutation and was first recorded in ball pythons in the 1990s. This morph will cost approximately $100.

Highway

The Highway is created by crossing the Gravel with a Yellow Belly morph. They have a copper base color and may have small rings along their body. Expect to pay approximately $500 for this unique looking morph.

Ivory

Bred from two Yellow Bellies, the Ivory’s appearance is somewhat unpredictable. The Ivory will have a patternless but attractive light pink body. The head will be a lavender color and may have patches. They cost around $250.

Lavender Albino

Combining the appearance of the Albino and the Lavender morph, the Lavender Albino has a lavender base, yellow pattern, and red eyes. Those with a clear contrast in their pattern tend to cost more, and a Lavender Albino will normally set you back around $400.

Lemon Blast

The Lemon Blast costs $200 and combines a Pastel and Pinstripe. The resulting morph has a fine lined pattern and dark colors.

Lesser

The Lesser is a cheap morph, costing around $100, although you pay a little more for a more unusual pattern. Although it was unique when first created, this morph, which has a blushed base color with spots along its back, is now one of the most common morphs.

Mojave

The Mojave is one of the most recognizable of all ball python morphs. It was first bred in 2000 and this morph is commonly used to produce incredible patterns in future generations. Its popularity and prevalence mean that this morph is available for $100 today.

Mystic

The Mystic morph is rare, has a dark brown base at birth but can become a purple color as they age, and it is this color-changing tendency that gives rise to the Mystic name. Despite its uniqueness, the Mystic costs a reasonable $150.

Pastel

The Pastel is a basic morph and has a normal pattern but they have a unique pale green eye color. They also have white lips on a pale head. Pastels are available for less than $100 each, while Super Pastels can cost twice this amount.

Pewter

Pewter is a designer morph, which means that it is not found in the wild. It has a light base color and a thick spinal stripe. The pattern and color are uniform in all Pewters and this morph costs $200.

Phantom

With a black base and yellow alien heads, the Phantom morph is commonly kept by breeders and because it is a common morph, one can be bought for $100.

Piebald

The Piebald is a highly recognizable ball python morph. It has a white base and patches of color and uneven pattern. Most Piebalds have a normal head and costs vary according to the ratio of white in the snake but typically vary between $300 and $400.

Pinstripe

The Pinstripe is a popular morph. The snake has a brown base color and has a patternless stripe that stretches down the back of the snake. Expect to part with $100 for a good-looking example of this morph.

Purple Passion

Combining the Mojave and Phantom morphs has given light to the Purple Passion markings with a lavender body and patternless sides. They have been bred for more than 10 years and typically cost $400 each.

Red

A common morph, the Red gene only affects the color of the snake and this morph has blotches with a red hue. It can bring out the red in other morphs so is popular with breeders and is usually available for $100 for a good example.

Ringer

The Ringer is usually used by breeders because it can expose snakes that carry the Pied gene, which is one of the most popular of all morphs. A Ringer is relatively cheap and this morph is available for about $100.

Scaleless

As the name suggests, the Scaleless morph has no scales. Instead, it has skin. Some examples do actually have a limited number of scales, but the fewer scales one of this morph has, the more it will cost, and prices can reach $2,500.

Spider

The Spider morph has a brown base and dark bands and spots. It also has black markings on its head and this morph can be bought for $150.

Spotnose

The Spotnose gene only really affects the head of the snake and gives it more alien head shapes with a light spot pattern. Pay around $150 for this morph.

Stormtrooper

The Stormtrooper was bred accidentally in 2015. The resulting snake was white with dark markings. Over time, the black pattern overtook the white base, but the effect has never been repeated, which means that this morph is not available for purchase.

Sunset

The Sunset is a hybrid morph that was bred in 2012. The red snake has a dark-red head but also has copper spots. Now available for around $1,000, the first example of this type of ball python sold for a staggering $70,000.

Super Blast

Crossing the Super Pastel with a Pinstripe led to the breeding of the Super Blast, a very popular morph with bright yellow color and black vertical lines. The popularity of the morph means that one may have to pay as much as $400 for one.

Tiger

The Desert Enchi, or Tiger, morph is a light yellow and orange base. It has a pattern consisting of bands and spots, and the intensity of the pattern determines the price you will have to pay, but this ranges from $200 to $400.

Vanilla

Commonly used by breeders for their ability to bring out the colors in other genes, the Vanilla morph has a blushed brown base and faded head, as well as normal patterns, and costs $100.

White

The White Ball Python is, as the name suggests, a pigmentless snake with no pigmented scales. They do retain their dark eyes, however, and will cost you around $650 for a good example of this morph.

Woma

The Woma Ball Python resembles the Woma Python, hence its name, and although they are a basic morph and available for around $250, they are actually difficult to breed. They cannot be crossbred with themselves, because the Super Woma dies quickly, and they produce unpredictable offspring.

Yellow Belly

The Yellow Belly Morph looks like a standard ball python except that they have a yellowish tint on their bellies. Their similarity to standard balls means that they only cost $50.