Sugar Glider Cage Set Up?

Sugar gliders need special cages to keep them safe and secure. Some cages can be purchased from the pet store to house your sugar glider, but you need to do a few things before welcoming your pet to their new home. Other times you may have to make your cage if you can’t find one that is pre-made to buy. Regardless of where your cage comes from, you can be sure your glider will love his new home if you follow these simple steps.

These can be made of untreated wood, plastic, wicker, or a cloth pouch can be hung from the cage. You do not need bedding in the nest box, but you can add a sleeping pouch or other soft cloth for your sugar glider to cuddle in.

What do sugar gliders need in their cage?

A large cage, at least 24 by 36 by 36 inches (61 by 91 by 91 centimeters), with a secure lock is recommended. The enclosure should have enough room for exercise as well as a place to put a food dish and a nest box or shelter in which your pet can sleep during the day.

What do you put in the bottom of a sugar glider cage?

Add a layer of absorbent bedding or substrate to the tray in the cage if there is a wire bottom on the cage. You do not need bedding in the nest box, but you can add a sleeping pouch or other soft cloth for your sugar glider to cuddle in.

Do sugar gliders need a heat lamp?

Therefore, if it’s not practical to keep their whole room at at least 75 degrees, then adding a small heat lamp to their cage – in addition to their heat rock – is strongly recommended at least for the first few weeks you have them (or as long as necessary if you like to keep your a little on the colder side).

Sugar gliders are tiny marsupials covered head to toe in luxurious, mink-like gray fur. A black stripe runs the full length of their bodies, stretching from the crown of their heads down their spines to the tips of their tails.

Besides paying attention to the overall size of your cage, you should also select one with bar spacing no wider than 1/4 inch. Many owners opt for a tall, large finch cage to hold their beloved pets.

If you choose this second option, make sure that the chicken wire is pinched off and carefully bent to avoid exposed sharp edges. These include boxes made from plastic, wicker, cloth pouches, or untreated wood. No matter the material you decide to use, hang it from the cage near the top as your sugar gliders will feel safest there.

Once youve set up a suitable nesting area and placed food and water containers in the right spots, its time to add a layer of substrate to the tray in the cage. Some owners also swear by adding a long piece of PVC pipe as a tunnel for your gliders to hide and play in. When you follow the specifics of the sugar glider cage set up outlined above, you can rest assured your pets will stay safe, entertained, and healthy.

Your sugar gliders permanent home (their enclosure) is just as important as their diet! This is where theyll spend all their time sleeping, eating, and playing whenever they aren’t with you, so it’s important that the cage provides adequate space and stimulating toys to keep your gliders healthy! The number of sugar gliders you have in each colony will determine the appropriate cage size to suite their needs. The minimum cage requirements will be just fine for 2-3 gliders of any age. In the long run, bigger is always better! And each additional glider will require a bit more space for comfortable living.

The biggest reason is that plastic bottles will over time leak chemical compositions into the water source that your gliders are drinking – which is something that we want to avoid!

Organizing your sugar glider habitat the right way is not a complicated task. However, there are a few things you should definitely get right to make sure your gliders thrive in their home. In this post, we will see what makes a good sugar glider cage set up.

These are nocturnal animals that tend to sleep through most of the day and stay busy at night, which is when they are typically kept inside their cages. Some clever sugar gliders eventually figure out how to open simple latches and let themselves out.

You may also want to learn some of the common signs of a sick sugar glider if the temperatures occasionally drop too low. As a matter of fact, the preferred temperature range for sugar gliders falls between 75-degrees and 80-degrees Fahrenheit. To maintain a slightly warmer temperature compared to the room, some owners choose to add fleece blankets in or around the cage.

You dont need a lamp or heat rock for the glider cage, as these pieces of equipment bring a risk of electrocution, shock, or burning. After purchasing a cage, you still need to gather the items that you plan to place inside it. Ideally, sugar gliders need several items to make their homes complete:

While gliders dont like to go to the bathroom where they sleep and eat, they will relieve themselves in a corner or away from the nesting pouch, food, and water. But if you choose a nest box, consider getting one made of plastic, making it easier to wipe clean. If choosing real wood, avoid cedar, plywood, oak, and red cherry.

Instead, choose pine, birch, balsam, maple, walnut, elm, or cactus. Moreover, large plastic rings provide spaces for sugar gliders to climb through. As a final suggestion, consider adding an exercise wheel but avoid the wire-type wheels.Source: My Pawfect Family

Bedding may need more frequent cleaning, especially if the cage houses multiple sugar gliders.

Do sugar gliders always need a cage?

Sugar gliders need stimulation to avoid getting bored. If the glider becomes isolated, lonely, and bored, it’s more likely to get depressed. That is why toys help keep the glider active. The stimulation it provides is essential to the physical and mental health of your pet.Toys come in a variety of sizes and textures. Some of the most common options include:For the most part, gliders enjoy toys that they can climb on and leap from. Typically, you secure the toys to the inside of the cage. If choosing real wood, avoid cedar, plywood, oak, and red cherry. These woods may pose health risks for the creatures. Instead, choose pine, birch, balsam, maple, walnut, elm, or cactus.When buying rope, only use rope made from 100% natural fibers, such as hemp or cotton. Nylon ropes may cause injury if the slider finds itself stuck. Moreover, large plastic rings provide spaces for sugar gliders to climb through. Just make sure that the rings are not too small to reduce the risk of the sugar glider getting its head stuck inside the ring.Bells are also popular, as sugar gliders enjoy making noise. As with any of the toys that you select, the bells should not pose a choking hazard. In fact, make sure to secure the bells to other objects, such as rings or rope. As a final suggestion, consider adding an exercise wheel but avoid the wire-type wheels.