Standard Schnauzer Giant Schnauzer?

The miniature and giant schnauzer are both derived from the standard schnauzer, a German breed that has existed for centuries. These dogs may appear at first glance to differ only in size. However, they also have key behavioral differences that have led the American Kennel Club to classify them as three distinct breeds, each with their own temperament and personality traits.

They are fiercely loyal and protective and have a long history as working dogs in Europe, capable of helping with various farm-related tasks. Like many intelligent breeds, the schnauzer can be strong-willed, so training should begin as early as possible to combat any stubborn streaks.

Their small size, boisterous nature and tendency to bark at strangers and doorbells might make them seem yappy and high strung.

Is a Giant Schnauzer a good family dog?

The Giant Schnauzer is good-natured but can be quite dominant. Typically friendly toward other dogs, Giant Schnauzers love to be around their families and children, making them ideal family pets. Giant Schnauzers are very loyal, devoted, and protective of their people—good traits for a guard dog.

What is bad about the Giant Schnauzer?

Fearfulness in a Giant Schnauzer can also be dangerous because it can lead to defensive biting if the dog becomes frightened and feels cornered. Potential animal aggression. Many Giant Schnauzers are dominant or aggressive toward other dogs of the same sex.

Are standard schnauzers aggressive?

Standard Schnauzers are bold and strong-willed. Socialization is critical. They may be aggressive towards people and dogs they don’t know, especially without adequate socialization when they are young. They require experienced owners who set firm, consistent boundaries.

What are the 3 types of Schnauzer?

There are three breeds: the Standard, the Giant, and the Miniature. Toy and teacup are not breeds of Schnauzer, but these common terms are used to market undersized or ill-bred Miniature Schnauzers.

The Giant Schnauzer is a breed of dog developed in the 17th century in Germany. It is the largest of the three breeds of Schnauzerthe other two breeds being the Standard Schnauzer and the Miniature Schnauzer. Numerous breeds were used in its development, including the black Great Dane, the Bouvier des Flandres, and the German Pinscher. Originally bred to assist on farms by driving livestock to market and guarding the farmer’s property, the breed eventually moved into the city, where it worked guarding breweries, butchers’ shops, stockyards and factories. It was unknown outside of Bavaria until it became popular as a military dog during World War I and World War II.

Today, the Giant Schnauzer participates in numerous dog sports , including Schutzhund . The first Giant Schnauzers emerged from Swabia in the German state of Bavaria , and Wrttemberg in the 17th century.

[1] The origins of the breed are unclear, but sources speculate it originated through some combination of black Great Danes , [1] German Shepherds , [1] Rottweilers , [1] Dobermanns , [1] Boxers , [1] Bouvier des Flandres , [1] Thuringian Shepherds , [2] and the Standard Schnauzer . The Giant Schnauzer was originally bred as a multipurpose farm dog for guarding property and driving animals to market. [8] By the turn of the 20th century the Giant Schnauzer was being used as a watchdog at factories, breweries , butcheries , and stockyards throughout Bavaria.

[1] It has the potential to be aggressive, [1] but Giant Schnauzers are usually reserved [2] they are “amiable in repose, and a commanding figure when aroused”. [1] They are also very energetic and highly spirited, [7] which, when coupled with boredom, can lead to unwanted and destructive behavior. Some breeders believe that pepper and salt colored Giant Schnauzers are more docile than their black-furred counterparts.

[12] Their beard can collect drool and food particles, making frequent cleanings essential. [14] They are also prone to skin diseases, such as seasonal flank alopecia , vitiligo , and follicular cysts. [14] This susceptibility occurs because melanoma is caused by a defect in the melanocytes , the cells that darken the color of the skin.

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The Giant Schnauzer is a larger and more powerful version of the Standard Schnauzer, and he should, as the breed standard says, be a bold and valiant figure of a dog. Great intelligence and loyalty make him a stellar worker and companion.

The Giant Schnauzer was created to be a working dog breed, so they have intelligence and drive. They can be a loyal and courageous companion for the person who can provide them with the training, exercise, and attention they need.

Low-sensitivity dogs, also called “easygoing,” “tolerant,” “resilient,” and even “thick-skinned,” can better handle a noisy, chaotic household, a louder or more assertive owner, and an inconsistent or variable routine. Breed isn’t the only factor that goes into affection levels; dogs who were raised inside a home with people around feel more comfortable with humans and bond more easily.

Mouthy dogs are more likely to use their mouths to hold or “herd” their human family members, and they need training to learn that it’s fine to gnaw on chew toys, but not on people. Mouthy breeds tend to really enjoy a game of fetch, as well as a good chew on a toy that’s been stuffed with kibble and treats. Originally bred to perform a canine job of some sort, such as retrieving game for hunters or herding livestock, they have the stamina to put in a full workday.

They need a significant amount of exercise and mental stimulation, and they’re more likely to spend time jumping, playing, and investigating any new sights and smells. When picking a breed, consider your own activity level and lifestyle, and think about whether you’ll find a frisky, energetic dog invigorating or annoying. These dynamos need lots of training to learn good manners, and may not be the best fit for a home with young kids or someone who’s elderly or frail.

Originally used to drive cattle to market, they excel as a police and guard dog and more recently branched out to drug detection and search and rescue. The keys to living successfully with a Giant Schnauzer include training, socialization, and providing physical and mental stimulation. Giant Schnauzers tend to be reserved and suspicious of strangers, a trait that makes them excellent guard dogs, but that characteristic must be balanced with socialization to avoid fearfulness or aggression.

Giant Schnauzers are energetic breed and require at least two long walks per day or 30 to 60 minutes of vigorous exercise in the backyard. As with every dog, Giant Schnauzers need early socialization –exposure to many different people, sights, sounds, and experiences when they’re young. Hip dysplasia is hereditary, but it can be worsened by environmental factors, such as rapid growth from a high-calorie diet or injuries incurred from jumping or falling on slick floors.

More obvious signs include obesity, mental dullness, drooping of the eyelids, low energy levels, and irregular heat cycles. Short nails keep the feet in good condition and won’t scratch your legs when your Giant Schnauzer jumps up to greet you. Giant Schnauzers can be prone to gastric torsion and should be fed two or three small meals per day to avoid any build up of gas.

Make grooming a positive experience filled with praise and rewards, and you’ll lay the groundwork for easy veterinary exams and other handling when they’re an adult.

History

Schnauzers have appeared throughout the ages in paintings from such artists as Albrecht Durer and Rembrandt. This breed appears to have begun as a cross between the black German poodle, the gray wolf spitz and the wirehaired pinscher. Small standards were then crossed with the affenpinscher, and possibly the poodle, to create the miniature schnauzer, while larger members of the breed were crossed with the Great Dane and the Bouvier des Flandres to create the giant schnauzer.

Standard Schnauzer

Standard schnauzers are friendly and intelligent dogs. They’re highly social, love children and generally do best in a family. They are fiercely loyal and protective and have a long history as working dogs in Europe, capable of helping with various farm-related tasks. They also make good guard dogs thanks to their territorial nature and tendency to bark at strangers. Like many intelligent breeds, the schnauzer can be strong-willed, so training should begin as early as possible to combat any stubborn streaks. This breed also possesses a lot of energy and needs to be able to burn it off with plenty of exercise.

Miniature Schnauzer

Miniature schnauzers share many of the same personality traits with standard schnauzers, but there are a few key differences. Their small size, boisterous nature and tendency to bark at strangers and doorbells might make them seem yappy and high strung. Although they tend to do well with children, these dogs were bred to hunt small, furry creatures and should be supervised around small children. Similarly, they probably shouldn’t co-exist in a house with pet rodents or birds and should be watched carefully around kittens. They do, however, tend to get along well with other dogs. While miniature schnauzers make good family pets, they have a tendency to single out a favorite person.

Giant Schnauzer

TheThey have a dense coarse coat that protects them from the weather and from vermin. Giant Schnauzers come in three color varieties: pepper and salt, pure black with black undercoat

History[edit]

The first Giant Schnauzers emerged from Swabia in the German state of Bavaria, and Württemberg in the 17th century.The Giant Schnauzer was originally bred as a multipurpose farm dog for guarding property and driving animals to market.In modern times, the Giant Schnauzer is used as a police dog; is trained for obedience, dog agility, herding, search and rescue, and schutzhund; and is shown in conformation shows.

Appearance[edit]

Although the Giant Schnauzer is called ‘Giant‘, this is not in comparison to other large dog breeds such as the Great Dane or the Rottweiler, but instead in comparison to the Standard and Miniature Schnauzers.The head is 1/2 the length of the dog’s back, when the back is measured from the withers to the base of the tail.

Temperament[edit]

Giant Schnauzers are usually a quiet breed.Giant Schnauzers have been described as trustworthy with children.

Health[edit]

Giant Schnauzers require regular grooming.Hip and elbow dysplasia are common.Some Giant Schnauzers develop central diabetes insipidus, autosomal recessive hypothyroidism, selective malabsorption of cobalamin, narcolepsy, cataplexy, and various seizure disorders.

Giant Schnauzer

The Giant Schnauzer was created to be a working dog breed, so they have intelligence and drive. They can be a loyal and courageous companion for the person who can provide them with the training, exercise, and attention they need.These pups originated in Germany, where they had jobs like driving cattle, working in butcher shops and stockyards, and even guarding breweries. Although this is a pure breed of dog, you may find them in shelters and rescues, so remember to adopt! Don’t shop if you decide this is the dog for you.Giant Schnauzers love to play and have high energy. They do best in homes with big yards to run and get plenty of exercise. Apartment life generally isn’t for them, and novice trainers beware. However, if you want a loyal guardian and energetic companion, this pooch may be your new best friend!DogTime recommendsSee all Giant Schnauzer dog breed characteristics below!