Staffordshire Bull Terrier Puppy?

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The Staffordshire Bull Terrier is slightly longer than they are tall, and relatively wide, giving them a low center of gravity and firm stance. Their small size imparts a surprising agility, while their heavy musculature provides great strength. Their head is wide and their gait is powerful and agile. Their coat is smooth, short, and close.

In the early 1800s, the Bulldog of the time was mixed with the Black and Tan Terrier, thus producing the Bull and Terrier, a fearless, quick and strong dog. From there, selective breeding resulted in a small, nimble dog with great strength. Efforts to produce an attractive pet resulted in the Staffordshire Bull Terrier’s recognition by the English Kennel Club in 1935 and in 1974 the AKC confirmed similar status. Those who live with Staffordshire Bull Terriers know them to be loving members of the family. The Staffordshire Bull Terrier is a fun-loving character that loves playing with their family and friends. They are typically playful, companionable, amiable, docile, and generally responsive to their family. Their love of a good game is rivaled only by their need for human companionship. They are generally very good with children; although usually gentle, some can be rambunctious. In the United Kingdom the Staffordshire Bull Terrier is known as the Nanny Dog, in reference to their eagerness and ability to get along with children in the home. This is an athletic breed that needs a good walk on leash every day. Most Staffordshire Bull Terriers are poor swimmers. Major concerns: CHD Minor concerns: none Occasionally seen: cataract, L2 HGA Suggested tests: hip, eye, DNA for L2 HGA, DNA for cataract Life span: 12–14 years Note: CHD seldom causes problems or symptoms Note: While the characteristics mentioned here may frequently represent this breed, dogs are individuals whose personalities and appearances will vary. Please consult the adoption organization for details on a specific pet.

How much do Staffordshire bull terrier puppies cost?

A Staffordshire Bull Terrier has an average cost of $2000 in the US. Staffies’ price ranges from $1000 to $3000. It varies due to the breeder’s reputation, location, and the dog’s pedigree, age, and gender. If a Staffordshire Bull Terrier is rare in your area, then it can cost a little higher.

Is a Staffy a good family dog?

Staffies can make great family pets. As a rule, they are gentle, affectionate dogs who adore people. … In fact, their well documented love of children once earned them the nickname “nanny dog”. Of course every dog is different and, in the wrong hands or with a bad experience, any breed can become troubled or aggressive.

Is a Staffordshire terrier the same as a pitbull?

Generally speaking, the American Staffordshire terrier is nearly the same breed as the American pit bull terrier. Today, the main difference is in appearance. The American Staffordshire terrier is bred in part for AKC conformation and conforms to a stricter standard, particularly in size range.

Are Staffordshire bull terriers aggressive?

Bill Lambert, from the Kennel Club, said Staffies are not naturally aggressive and were one of the only breeds it recommended as suitable around children.

From his brawling past, the muscular but agile Staffordshire Bull Terrier retains the traits of courage and tenacity. Happily, good breeding transformed this former gladiator into a mild, playful companion with a special feel for kids.

Although they were created in 19th-century Britain to be a small, fast fighting dog, those days are long past. The Staffordshire Bull Terrier dog breed of today is a fine companion known for their courage, intelligence, and love of children.

Low-sensitivity dogs, also called “easygoing,” “tolerant,” “resilient,” and even “thick-skinned,” can better handle a noisy, chaotic household, a louder or more assertive owner, and an inconsistent or variable routine. Breed isn’t the only factor that goes into affection levels; dogs who were raised inside a home with people around feel more comfortable with humans and bond more easily. Mouthy dogs are more likely to use their mouths to hold or “herd” their human family members, and they need training to learn that it’s fine to gnaw on chew toys, but not on people. Originally bred to perform a canine job of some sort, such as retrieving game for hunters or herding livestock, they have the stamina to put in a full workday. When picking a breed, consider your own activity level and lifestyle, and think about whether you’ll find a frisky, energetic dog invigorating or annoying. These dynamos need lots of training to learn good manners, and may not be the best fit for a home with young kids or someone who’s elderly or frail. He has been described as “a sort of everybody’s Man Friday,” and his greatest desire is to spend time with his people, whether that means vegging out on the sofa and watching football, running errands in the car, going for walks, or participating in activities such as agility, flyball, obedience, and therapy work. In the United States, the Staffordshire Bull Terrier generally enjoyed life as a family companion, and it wasn’t until 1975 that the breed was recognized by the American Kennel Club. Like every dog, a Staffordshire Bull Terrier needs early socialization–exposure to many different people, sights, sounds, and experiences–when he’s young, and it should continue throughout his life. Inviting visitors over regularly, and taking him to busy parks, stores that allow dogs, and on leisurely strolls to meet neighbors will also help him polish his social skills. It then builds up in cerebrospinal fluid and plasma, causing such signs as lack of coordination, muscle tremors, poor learning ability, and seizures. The mites live in hair follicles and usually don’t cause any problems, but dogs with weakened or compromised immune systems can develop a condition called demodectic mange. The American Academy of Veterinary Dermatology recommends neutering or spaying all dogs that develop generalized demodectic mange because there is a genetic link. Like all terriers, Staffords are diggers, so it is important to reinforce fences by embedding them in concrete or burying chicken wire at the bottom to prevent escapes. His short face makes the Staffordshire Bull Terrier unsuited to staying outdoors for more than a few minutes in a hot or humid climate, and he should always have access to shade and fresh drinking water. Make grooming a positive experience filled with praise and rewards, and you’ll lay the groundwork for easy veterinary exams and other handling when he’s an adult.

The Staffordshire Bull Terrier is rated high on Bark Busters’ list of popular breeds, coming in as the 4th most popular trained breed in the USA, and 3rd in the United Kingdom, Canada, Australia and New Zealand

If selecting your Staffordshire Bull Terrier puppy from a breeder, try and view both parents to determine the type of personality your puppy might grow up to be. Don’t concern yourself if one of the puppy’s parents is the type of dog that barks on your approach to the property, providing they are friendly once you have gained access. Check out the hereditary history of your puppy. Check whether any of the parents or grandparents had any genetic diseases. Puppies inherit a lot from their parents and ancestors, including their personality, their genetic DNA and their characteristics and personality. So if you spot a parent that has some signs of serious aggression or fear issues, this dog is more likely to produce some offspring that will inherit some or all of those traits. Puppies also learn a lot from their parents while they are in their environment especially when they are with their mother. The right type of early puppy education from its mother and siblings is an important factor towards how well-adjusted you puppy will be and how it will behave in the future. For this reason, it is not wise to take possession of your puppy until at least 8 weeks of age or older if possible. Experienced breeders will want to adhere to this as they know that the puppy gains a lot of education if it is allowed to stay in that environment a little longer. Be wary of anyone who says that you can take your Staffie puppy away at the age of 4 to 5 weeks. Your puppy is missing out on vital education from its mother, which will affect its behavior in the future. When selecting a Staffordshire Bull Terrier puppy, be sure to select the personality of puppy that suits your lifestyle. Be sure that you know the type of personality you are looking for: Family pet that is good with children? You will need to give thought to the amount of time you have to devote to your Staffie. Be sure that you have the room needed to accommodate a lively breed and that you are capable of educating such an energetic breed of dog. Think carefully of the amount of time that your new dog or puppy will have to spend alone. Staffies are not high on the scale of those dogs capable of being left alone too much. You might need to budget for ‘dog walkers’ or consider a ‘day care center’. Bark Busters offer lots of advice to new dog and puppy parents and we have a huge resource of information on the needs of dogs and how to best manage them, and what works. New dog parents often ask us whether they should adopt one or two Staffordshire Bull Terrier puppies. Their concern is that their dog will be lonely while ‘Home Alone’ and they are out at work. We have all seen that animated film “The Secret Life of Pets’ and what dogs get up to when left alone. Although fiction, many of the things they depicted in that movie were based on fact. Dogs do suffer separation anxiety and resort to, destructive behavior such as counter surfing and raiding the trash bin when left to their own devices. In that movie, one of the pet parents brought home another dog for her “Home Alone” dog and initially they did not hit it off. This again is based on fact because truthfully some dogs don’t. Even dogs from the same litter can suffer from sibling rivalry. All puppies are adaptable if given the right environment and education in which to thrive. They soon look upon you as part of their pack — a two-legged dog — and they can fit right into that social structure with ease. However, many people will think of their dog as a little four-legged human! A pup and a kitten are a good option if you are not looking to add two dogs to your family unit. Here is a check list of things to look for when selecting your Staffordshire Bull Terrier dog/puppy: Check out the way they walk, particularly their hind legs, to see if you can spot any weakness there. The dog’s hocks should be properly aligned and equal, not bending in or out. Is the Staffie puppy/dog you are thinking of selecting friendly, with an outgoing personality? A timid type that avoids approaching you could be a sign of a personality problem. Any attempt at avoiding humans is a warning sign that the dog or puppy has issues with strangers, which could manifest into aggression towards strangers. This again is not a good sign, especially if you live in an apartment or gated community. Is the puppy biting down hard onto your hands or feet? Bark Busters are called upon to train many puppies who have aggressive biting issues. Check out the animal shelters, rescues or speak to breeders to find the right Staffordshire Terrier for your needs. Although Staffies are generally a friendly, fun loving breed, occasionally you will encounter that undesirable personality. So be selective and make sure you follow the Bark Busters’ check list on what to look for when selecting your new Staffordshire Bull Terrier dog or puppy. When searching for a Staffie be sure to check out your local animal shelter or rescue. Check out the following link to see how easily these dogs can be reformed with Bark Busters training. Always try to bring your new dog or puppy home early in the day. The reason behind this is that they will need time to become accustomed to their new home. If you can bring something from their old home like some bedding or a toy, this will help them to settle. You need to ensure that you have pre-selected where your new dog or puppy will sleep and start to get it used to this by feeding it there during the day and spending time with it there. If you have selected a crate, you will need to make sure that you place your dog in it well before bed time, so you have time to see how it’s going to react when you leave it. Be sure to select a place for your dog to sleep that is practical. It should not be your bed unless you are determined to always have your dog sleep with you. Otherwise, you won’t break that habit easily. If your dog or puppy begins barking or crying, don’t rush to it. Instead stay close by and address their concerns with a correction. This will calm them faster than rushing back each time they bark or cry out.

Form and Function

Breed Traits

Energy Level

Exercise Requirements

Playfulness

Affection Level

Friendliness To Dogs

Friendliness To Other Pets

Friendliness To Strangers

Watchfulness

Ease of Training

Grooming Requirements

Heat Sensitivity

Vocality

Breed Attributes

Type

Terrier

Weight

24-38 lb

Height

14-16″

Family

Terrier, Mastiff

Area of Origin

England

Date of Origin

1800s

History

In the early 1800s, the Bulldog of the time was mixed with the Black and Tan Terrier, thus producing the Bull and Terrier, a fearless, quick and strong dog. From there, selective breeding resulted in a small, nimble dog with great strength. Efforts to produce an attractive pet resulted in the Staffordshire Bull Terrier’s recognition by the English Kennel Club in 1935 and in 1974 the AKC confirmed similar status. Those who live with Staffordshire Bull Terriers know them to be loving members of the family.

Temperament

The Staffordshire Bull Terrier is a fun-loving character that loves playing with their family and friends. They are typically playful, companionable, amiable, docile, and generally responsive to their family. Their love of a good game is rivaled only by their need for human companionship. They are also characteristically friendly toward strangers. Some can be strong willed. They can be fearless and tenacious. They may not do well around strange dogs or sometimes even household dogs that are assertive. They are generally very good with children; although usually gentle, some can be rambunctious. In the United Kingdom the Staffordshire Bull Terrier is known as the Nanny Dog, in reference to their eagerness and ability to get along with children in the home.

Upkeep

This is an athletic breed that needs a good walk on leash every day. They also enjoy a good game in the yard or a run in a safe area, such as a fenced yard. Most Staffordshire Bull Terriers are poor swimmers. Their coat care is minimal.

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Staffordshire Bull Terrier

Although they were created in 19th-century Britain to be a small, fast fighting dog, those days are long past. The Staffordshire Bull Terrier dog breed of today is a fine companion known for their courage, intelligence, and love of children.Fans of the breed lovingly refer to them as Staffy for short. Even though these are purebred dogs, you may find them in the care of shelters and rescue groups. Remember to adopt! Don’t shop if you want to bring one of these dogs home.Despite their affectionate and playful nature, Staffies do best with experienced pet parents who can socialize them early and keep up with consistent training. Meet the breed’s needs, and you’ll have a faithful, adoring member of the family.See below for full list of dog breed traits and facts about Staffordshire Bull Terriers!

Staffordshire Bull Terrier Dog Breed Pictures

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