Spider With White Butt?

First I’d like to know what kind of spider this is. Then I was wondering if you could explain what the white fuzzy-looking ball attached to its rear might be. Many thanks for your time and help….Denise K.

What is white ball on spiders?

The egg sac is made of spider silk. The eggs are laid onto it and it is then gathered up into a ball shape. Females carry the egg sac under their bodies. They look like tiny white golf balls.

Outbursts like these are common throughout much of the United States and, indeed, the world, when a spider‘s cover is blown, and it is forced to skitter this way and that along the wall or across the living room carpet to avoid being, as suggested above, speedily smashed.

It is unfortunate that so many of these harmless eight-legged critters have to pay such a price for our unfounded fears and instinctive squishing behaviors, especially since they work so hard to rid our homes of ever creepier (in the author’s personal opinion) pests such as silverfish, fleas, bed bugs, gnats, and flies. I find that the basis for most fears of spiders is the fact that most people don’t know the difference between those that are harmful to humans and those that are perfectly capable of coexisting with us peacefully.

And so, in the spirit of enlightenment, I have devised a way to help any and all who are curious learn about which spiders pose a danger and which do not. Female black widows are perhaps the most easily identifiable spider in human history. Whether the red mark is in the shape of an hourglass or simply a dot, it is safe to assume that any shiny black spider with a bulbous abdomen falls under this category.

A stable source of heat (such as a human dwelling) An ample supply of food (flies, woodlice, other spiders, etc.) However, if venom is injected, then the following symptoms are often muscle cramps and spasms near the site of the bite, fever, and nausea. Stay calm and apply concentrated heat to the bite to minimize the spread of the venom and alleviate pain.

Brown recluses have a distinctively smooth appearance compared to most other spiders their size. The famed “violin shape” (the base of the violin starts near the eyes, and the neck of the instruments points down toward the abdomen), which is supposed to be the telltale sign for this species, is sadly not confined to brown recluses, nor do all brown recluses possess it. Also, the abdomen of the recluse spider is devoid of markings, and their legs are smooth with no thick hairs.

Brown recluses have a smaller range than most people think, not straying further west than the Rocky Mountains and rarely venturing north of Nebraska. Because the brown recluse is so excellent at hiding, there have not been many studies on them outside of research on the effects of their bites. Red, itching skin is the first symptom of the bite of a brown recluse spider.

The area then develops into a blister, followed by an open sore, which in turn is accompanied by a rash of tiny red dots. Stay calm and apply concentrated heat to the bite to minimize the spread of the venom and alleviate pain. The venom of a brown recluse causes necrosis, or the death of tissue, which can take a long time to heal.

The brown recluse is often wrongfully blamed because both species look related at a glance, and their bite patterns and symptoms are similar. Hobo spiders, unlike brown recluses, have a mottled coloration and distinctive “herringbone” patterns on their abdomen. The easiest way to differentiate brown recluses from hobo spiders is by geographic location.

The hobo spider was introduced to the Port of Seattle from Europe in the late 1920s, and they have since spread throughout the Northwestern United States and Western Canada. In fact, scientists debate whether this spider‘s venom can cause the necrosis of human tissue at all. SpiderStates and RegionsUsually the southern United States, although they can be found as far north as Canada

Primarily Texas, Oklahoma, Nebraska, Missouri, Kansas, Arkansas, and Colorado Washington, Oregon, Wyoming, Colorado, Utah, Montana, Idaho, Northern California, Western Canada Now that the scary stuff is out of the way, here are a few “creepy crawlies” that will not only creep up on all of the aforementioned threats but will also keep the crawling population of fleas, mites, and moths on the down-low.

Using their vision, they can perform fast, complicated maneuvers around objects to get to their prey, which they will bite and subdue with their tiny fangs. Because of their speed and eyesight, jumping spiders are capable of besting prey larger and more venomous than themselves, and this author has personally witnessed them snatch flies right out of the air. Round and shiny, the common house spider can be confused for a black widow at first glance.

Sometimes referred to as “cobweb spiders,” they are gray to brown in color, with speckling on their abdomen that could be likened to the mottling found on wild bird eggs. And while there is no definite way to distinguish the two at a quick glance, giant house spiders tend to be more yellowish in color, with distinctive black stripes on the abdomen. However, sometimes spiders will hide in places they think are safe but will ultimately lead to an unfortunate interaction between them and humans.

This is good practice to prevent any creepy crawly in the house (ants, silverfish, etc.) You can do this by putting them in a tied or sealed plastic bag or by taping the corners of cardboard boxes closed. For example, avoid leaving tarps and cardboard on the ground and move firewood so that it is not stacked near the house.

Hopefully, now, with the knowledge of both the dangers and helpers that you may find in your home, your mind will be put at relative ease. As of yet, there is no manmade pesticide or trap more effective against a population of harmful insects than a good old-fashioned family of spiders. Content is for informational or entertainment purposes only and does not substitute for personal counsel or professional advice in business, financial, legal, or technical matters.

It would curl up on my wall in plain sight like a dead spider and stay that way for hours, then later I’d finally find it poking around again. Here we goooo,” I held my palm below it, grabbed it’s silk tether from above, walked it outside and hung it from an acceptable place. I saw a pale brown spider climb up my wall and it had skinny legs, black fangs and it was the size of my thumbprint.

i have a black striped and dark brown spider which is huge but doesnt look like anything mentioned here.i think its the same size as giant house Bit by tan hairy spider its hurting i can taste peppery amonia im swelling in feet im naucious feverish and sleepy the not is hard like quarter size its not brown reclse i have few hole like scars from past bites and am not sure what kind this was killed it but it was teamed with larger calicoe spider not sure which actually bit me am i going to dir So, today i was doing my daily load of laundry, and came across this large spider, that was INSIDE my dryer.

Mk i saw a spider that had a long or big body and little legs and its black or brown is it dangerous but over a year ago, i saw a big spider with fuchsia fuzz on its eight legs, and two small diamonds. Then i thought “that felt like a bug or something” so i turned on my phones flashlight and sure enough there was the common house spider that just crawled across my nose and mouth area.

I found a spider around 2 inches big and is orange and white striped legs are very long. The abdomen was more elongated rather than rounded, unlike the pictures I just viewed of the infamous black widow. But also now that I think about it, it could be a wolf spider and well they also can not kill you but from my experience with them the bite sucks ass to have.

So I was asleep and I had this dream about a white shiny orb weaver spider with perfect round circles all over it’s body and it was about the size of a quarter. As for IDK from 2 days ago that sounds like a jumping spider and it won’t harm you it is venomous to it’s prey but it doesn’t have enough potency to kill a human being. in my house i found a spider it was fast a little furry and medium size is it venomous in North America?

saw a yellowish spider with black stripes in my room today was in the middle of working on my laptop when they decided to come down right next to my head. i am not ashamed to say that i screamed and threw my wireless mouse at it along with a few books am mostly glad that it managed to escape all of that though Found what I think was a giant house spider the other day, at the golf course, everyone was hanging out under cover while the rain passed.

The guys were freaking out and I very carefully entered the bathroom where the large long legged house spider was chilling out waiting for prey. I just saw a tiny hopping spider in the house today, black with a white dot on its back. I keep finding these shiny spiders that look black at a quick glance but when a closer view it says shiny sticky looking brown and the spider moves pretty quick and has a big bottom I kept my.

I live in the Newburgh New York area does anybody possibly know what this photo could be if it poses a threat? So, I havehave had this spider by my home for almost a month now, it looks similar to thesee hobo but not quite, I have cats and 1 dog and I don’t know if this spider is a threat to my house hold, its about as big as a 5 rand coin, its bumm is light brown and has brown spots on each side,its bumm is round but slightly curved at the end , its legs are long and where the legs bend it seems to be afriends darker shade of brown. He tends to relocate around the truck every week or so, setting up intricate webs and quietly waiting directly in the center with all of his hairy legs outstretched in near-perfect symmetry.

His abdomen is large, and silky in appearance, with symmetrical moss-green, black, and bright white markings. His head is very furry, light tan on the top mixing with one stripe of black on each side going toward the abdomen. There are only two small eyes visible in the front, likely the rest are concealed by the very shaggy hair.

And the spider from his description is about the size of a quarter dollar, possibly a bit bigger.. HELP i just brought my cumquat tree inside and there were webs on most of the leaves and there was a grey almost translucent spider. under on if the leaves there was what looked similar to a very small piece of honey comb that was dark yellow brown and black.

I saw a black spider with a white thing on its back, I left so quickly, I didn’t understand what the shape was, the internet is no help. I was pulling weeds from my garden and noticed a huge spider, light brown in color with bright yellow stripes down it body. I have lived in the south- Mississippi, Alabama and Tennessee and KNOW that brown recluses are very prevelant there…probably all the surrounding states as well:-( We have also have seen Hobo spiders in Iowa at a hotel.

I hope this remedy is helpful.. my husband, and brother in law, nephew, and mom have all been bitten by brown recluse and mixing bentonite clay with a little coconut oil and applying thickly with a bandage did an amazing job healing the wound and stopping necrotizing. I found a spider with a tiny bright almost neon orange head and really long legs. I give them water in bottle pop lids and black bed bugs.

Me and my kid saw a tiny black spider with two white lines on the back and we dont know what it is or if its venomous I saw this big spider crawl across my floor it had a pointy red ish tail then a few hours later another one came im scared is this dangerous or not What is a big black spider with long legs that like to live in dark places like closets, drawers, and the hollow frame around a metal door.

and saw it on a web with the flashlight (this is at night) after feeling a pinch and then my the top of my foot started getting really itchy. I found a spider with a green spot in its abomen, main color is grey, but at the beginning of the legs, it’s red, and has black rings around the joint. very helpful…it is definitely a good thing to have spiders around…they protect us from the bugs that can really hurt us – those that spead disease and parasites.

my thumb hurt the most and i then noticed two small white circles that looked like ring due to it being bite marks. The next night i went to put my government book away and saw a big brown spider run from behind my papasan chair that resembles the hobo spider..i stod on myy bed and called my mom(more like sobbed) and it took her about 10 minuets to hear me since we were all in bed and when she got there she couldnt find the spider.My hand is fine now but was numb and burning for a few days… buuutttt….i still can’t find the spider… These comments are the exact reason this person took the time to explain the difference.

I live in Ontario, Canada; we have brown recluses here, along with black widows, and have for some time…many years, in fact. Hey I live in Colorado and there was this spider in my basement and it was hairy and medium size?

While the picture you found online is undeniably a brown recluse, it is highly unlikely that the one you found in your apartment was the same kind. Loxosceles species do not range that far north. There are, however, a number of other spiders that have similar characteristics, such as a pale abdomen and long, slender legs.

Recluse or Not? is a collaboration with North Carolina entomologists Eleanor Spicer Rice (Dr. Eleanors Book of Common Spiders) and Matt Bertonethat you can read all about on the project page here! Briefly, it is a way for citizens to contribute data about where in North America recluse spiders (genus Loxosceles) occur, and to quickly get suspected recluse spiders identified by an expert. We also aim to correct myths and misinformation by regularly tweeting facts about recluse spiders from our new twitter account, @RecluseOrNot.

The first time it happened was during our epic journey from Toronto to southern Texas to California and then to Victoria (also known as #SpiderTrip2016 check out some of the great photos Sean took along the way here ). We stopped one morning in Joshua Tree National Park and flipped over some rocks to see if we could find any insects or spiders hiding underneath.

The sandy camouflage was similar to that of the beach-dwelling wolf spider Arctosa perita , but on closer inspection I realized the eyes were all wrong for it to be a lycosid. I cant say for sure what species it is because the most recent revision of the genus is an unpublished thesis that I cant get my hands on at the moment (for what its worth, I suspect Syspira tigrina ). Our second wolf-like spider is a much smaller critter (less than 5 mm in body length) that we found wandering the forest floor while we were hiking at Mount Work on southern Vancouver Island this past weekend.

based on a drawing of a similar tiny spider in our field guide, and our friend and arachnological guru Robb Bennett quickly confirmed the guess. These spiders hunt on the ground and low vegetation during the day and are most often found in open sunny areas of wooded or disturbed habitats. A flat sheet of silk hides the egg sac and the female stands guard to protect her offspring from predators and parasites.

But this spider was different from the ones we usually find in the building tiny (only a couple of millimetres long), pale in colour, and a very fast runner! A name that means living in the house is highly appropriate for these synanthropic spiders that are commonly found in human dwellings. The official common name for the family is flatmesh weavers (at least in North America, according to the American Arachnological Society ) because of the flat webs they build.

They use the fringe of hairs on their jointed anal tubercles to comb silk directly from arrays of spigots on a pair of enlarged spinnerets. The anal tubercle is also equipped with sensory hairs (mh) that are used to detect prey movement via vibrations through the silk threads. Female and juveniles of Oecobius navus can produce cribellar silk, but adult males have a reduced cribellum and dont have a calamistrum at all.

Early work on spiders in the genus Oecobius suggested that they were ant-specialists, but more recent research has shown that they eat a variety of prey types. The male spins a tubular silk mating web on top of the females retreat and tries to entice her to join him inside. I didnt see any oecobiids on the list, so I emailed the author, Robb Bennett, and it turns out that this photo is the first record of the family for British Columbia.

Sean and I were impressed by Cyclosas ability to recognize the mimetid as as being dangerous rather than dinner, but disappointed not to see Mimetus succeed in securing a meal. Mimetids look most similar to orb-weavers (araneids) and cobweb weavers (theridiids) but they can be distinguished from spiders in all other families by the unique pattern of spines on their first two pairs of very long legs. The eye arrangement is not so diagnostic (its quite similar to that of araneids and theridiids) but heres a great portrait courtesy of the Insects Unlocked project.

Finally, Mimetids build characteristic egg sacs that are easy to identify to genus even in the absence of the mother (who inevitably abandons her offspring). The sac has a long thin stalk and/or a fluffy coating, depending on the genus, and these two features may help protect the eggs within from parasitoids or predators. Egg sac of a mimetid in the genus Ero , found hanging inside a hollow stump in Burns Bog, Delta, BC.

They are fairly ant-like in size and colour (often red or brown and/or black) and they move around a lot like ants, waving their front legs like antennae, and bobbing their abdomens in ant-like fashion. In this case, harmless Castianeira spiders might benefit by looking like the much more dangerous velvet ants, and thus be avoided by predators (this is called Batesian mimicry ). One of the most gorgeous spiders I have ever seen is the Castianeira dorsata (below, and at the top of this post) that Sean found wandering around by a stream one evening while we were staying at the Southwestern Research Station in Arizona.

I dont know of any velvet ants that look much like this (although many are bright orange), but I just cant get over how beautiful this spider is with its sunset-like stripes on the abdomen and a bluish iridescence on the carapace. Segestriids are closely related to spiders in the family Dysderidae (which includes the common woodlouse hunter , Dysdera crocata ). The function of this striking colouration is not clear its unlikely to be for catching the eye of a potential mate, because these spiders have poor vision and rely mainly on vibratory and acoustic communication.

What we do know is that this structural colour is produced by parallel layers of chitin that reflect different wavelengths of light (called a multilayer reflector ). Segestria florentina female showing off her beautiful irridescent green chelicerae (Photo: , licensed under CC BY-SA 2.5 ES ) Segestriids are nocturnal and build their tube webs in crevices, often in the cracks of rock walls, under loose tree bark, or in the ends of broken branches .

The hunting spider sits near the entrance of the tube, waiting for prey to make contact with one of her trip lines. This contact transmits vibrations through the silk to the spiders sensitive feet, six of which rest near the opening of the web, allowing her to determine the exact location of the prey. Corolla spiders in the genus Ariadna live in the Namib Desert , and have modified their tube webs to include a circle of stones around the entrance.

The function of the stones is essentially the same as the silk signal lines of a regular tube web, which would not be very effective in the desert because of the constantly shifting sands and gravel. Characterization of the green iridescence on the chelicerae of the tube web spider, Segestria florentina (Rossi 1790) (Araneae, Segestriidae) . I encourage you to peruse his website and the articles linked in this post yourself, but I will highlight a few of the more compelling reasons that the brown recluse hysteria is unwarranted.

Furthermore, misdiagnoses of all manner of other (more serious) conditions as brown recluse bites are rampant throughout North America (even in areas where the spiders do not occur), adding fuel to the already raging fire.

Biggest Threats

The leading ladies and gentlemen on this list are of course the ever-beautiful female

Black Widow Bites

Female black widows are perhaps the most easily identifiable spider in human history. The striking red markings on their undersides are a dead giveaway to their species. Whether the red mark is in the shape of an hourglass or simply a dot, it is safe to assume that any shiny black spider with a bulbous abdomen falls under this category.The males of this species are smaller, shyer, and less venomous than their female counterparts. In fact, there has been much speculation as to whether or not they are more deadly than the common garden spider! Also, they look nothing like their women; they’re thin and usually mottled brown or gray.Black widows, like cockroaches, can be found anywhere in the United States providing there is:They are more prominent in warmer states because they can breed and catch food outside. Natural enemies of this spider do exist and consist mainly of wasps such as the blue mud dauber and the spider wasp.

Brown Recluse

While the black widow is easily identified by her shiny black exterior, large abdomen, and red shape on the underside, the brown recluse is less easily recognized because of his dull colors.The famed “violin shape” (the base of the violin starts near the eyes, and the neck of the instruments points down toward the abdomen), which is supposed to be the telltale sign for this species, is sadly not confined to brown recluses, nor do all brown recluses possess it. Perhaps the only foolproof way of identifying these tricky arachnids is to count their eyes. It’s true! While most spiders have eight eyes, the brown recluse is unique in that it has only six. Also, the abdomen of the recluse spider is devoid of markings, and their legs are smooth with no thick hairs.Brown recluses have a smaller range than most people think, not straying further west than the Rocky Mountains and rarely venturing north of Nebraska. They prefer quieter, darker, and warmer places to raise their families, so they don’t travel with humans to new places as often as black widows do.Because the brown recluse is so excellent at hiding, there have not been many studies on them outside of research on the effects of their bites. So, the statement that the brown recluse has no natural enemy should be taken with a grain of salt. People who have watched and collected data from the brown recluses in their homes have noted seeing other spiders (particularly the jumping spider) attack and kill them with relative ease.

Brown Recluse Bites

Red, itching skin is the first symptom of the bite of a brown recluse spider. The area then develops into a blister, followed by an open sore, which in turn is accompanied by a rash of tiny red dots. Fever and nausea can also occur.If you are bitten by a brown recluse, see a doctor immediately. Stay calm and apply concentrated heat to the bite to minimize the spread of the venom and alleviate pain. The venom of a brown recluse causes necrosis, or the death of tissue, which can take a long time to heal.

Hobo Spider

The hobo spider is one that more people need to be aware of. They are the real cause of countless so-called “brown recluse bites.” The brown recluse is often wrongfully blamed because both species look related at a glance, and their bite patterns and symptoms are similar. But a second look at these critters can identify them in a minute’s time. Hobo spiders, unlike brown recluses, have a mottled coloration and distinctive “herringbone” patterns on their abdomen. Their legs are also hairier than those of the brown recluse.The easiest way to differentiate brown recluses from hobo spiders is by geographic location. The hobo spider was introduced to the Port of Seattle from Europe in the late 1920s, and they have since spread throughout the Northwestern United States and Western Canada. Brown recluses do not live in the Northwest or Canada.Fortunately for us Northwesterners, the hobo spider has a nice list of natural predators, particularly the crab spider, Pardosa wolf spider, and again our friend the jumping spider.

Hobo Spider Bites

Purported hobo spider bites have had symptoms similar to the bites of brown recluse spiders, though no fatalities have been reported. In fact, scientists debate whether this spider‘s venom can cause the necrosis of human tissue at all.The research is murky because most people who report bites do not capture the spider, so experts have not been able to identify whether the hobo spider is actually associated with dangerous bites. If bitten, it is imperative that the spider be captured or preserved as entirely as possible, and then sent to a lab (many state universities have labs that are appropriate for this) to aid in identification and future research.

Harmless Helpers

Now that the scary stuff is out of the way, here are a few “creepy crawlies” that will not only creep up on all of the aforementioned threats but will also keep the crawling population of fleas, mites, and moths on the down-low. Not to mention they pose no danger to pets, children, or adults in the home.I’m talking about the endearing

Jumping Spider

If you ever see one of these little guys hopping around on your furniture, don’t be alarmed. These curious spiders are one of your greatest friends in the pest-ridding business. They are easy to identify because of their unique eye pattern and inquisitive behavior.If approached, instead of scurrying away like other spiders would, the jumping spider will jump and turn to face the advancer, sometimes even looking up and studying them. Jumping spiders are regarded by many as being ‘cute’ because of their antics and large eyes.Jumping spiders have excellent vision, as their giant eyes would suggest, and can, in fact, see better than any other spider and debatably any other insect in the world. Using their vision, they can perform fast, complicated maneuvers around objects to get to their prey, which they will bite and subdue with their tiny fangs.Because of their speed and eyesight, jumping spiders are capable of besting prey larger and more venomous than themselves, and this author has personally witnessed them snatch flies right out of the air.There are over 5,000 species of jumping spider in the world, but the most helpful seem to be those of the family

Common House Spider

Unlike the jumping spider, which walks around with an air of adventure, the common house spider prefers to keep a quiet profile in a corner of your garage or basement. Sometimes referred to as “cobweb spiders,” they are gray to brown in color, with speckling on their abdomen that could be likened to the mottling found on wild bird eggs.Because of their similar size and shape, common house spiders are sometimes mistaken for black widows, but it is important to note the color of the spider before jumping to conclusions. Common house spiders are not black and have no red markings.They are passive hunters, meaning that they make webs and wait for prey to come to them. They are excellent in keeping the numbers of destructive moths, flies, and mosquitoes down. They will even tackle wasps and yellow jackets, which may be important if you bring firewood into your home since wasps will sometimes hibernate in the lumber). They will be content to live quietly by a window in your attic and pose no threat to humans.

Giant House Spider

The giant house spider has a horrible reputation and causes a lot of panic in Northwestern homes because it is easily mistaken for the hobo spider. And while there is no definite way to distinguish the two at a quick glance, giant house spiders tend to be more yellowish in color, with distinctive black stripes on the abdomen. Also, they can reach a leg span of four inches, while the hobo spider will typically only span a single modest inch.Although a giant house spider looks similar to a hobo spider, their risks to humans could not be more different. The giant house spider‘s venom is harmless (nothing worse than a bumblebee’s sting), and they actually kill and eat hobo spiders themselves, making them an excellent addition to any crawlspace, basement, or garage. In fact, they are considered the best deterrent against a hobo spider invasion.Because of their size, the giant house spider can dispose of more prey, as well as take on much bigger insects than the jumping spider or common house spider could.

Spiders Are Our Friends

None of the spiders listed here bite humans very often. They need their venom to catch their food and do not want to waste it unless they are in danger of being killed.However, sometimes spiders will hide in places they think are safe but will ultimately lead to an unfortunate interaction between them and humans. Terrified spiders that think they will be crushed can sometimes bite out of defense. Here are some tips you can use to prevent this from happening in your home: