Short Hair Brussels Griffon?

The Brussels Griffon is square-proportioned, thickset, and compact. This breed has good bone for its size. This dogs movement is a purposeful trot, with moderate reach and drive. In temperament, Brussels Griffons are full of self-importance, and their carriage reflects this attitude. Their almost human expression attracts attention and admirers. Their coat can be rough, with hard wiry hair, which is longer around the head; or smooth, with a short glossy coat.

In the late 1800s, this mixture was then crossed with the Pug, at that time extremely popular in neighboring Holland. The Pug mixes account for the brachycephalic head type and for the smooth-coated individuals of the breed, known then (and still in some countries) as the Petit Brabancon.

The smooths were not initially accepted, since griffon means wiry. By 1880, the breed was sufficiently established to be recognized at Belgian dog shows. Around this same time there is some suggestion that additional mixes were made with the Yorkshire Terrier and English Toy Spaniel, the latter further contributing to the Brussels Griffons head configuration.

By the early 1900s, the little street urchin had risen to the heights of popularity in Belgium and found itself in great demand by nobility. The spunky Brussels Griffon is full of himself, brimming with self-confidence and gusto. Brussels Griffons make saucy companions for a family wanting an entertaining, sensitive pet.

However, sensitivity and size make them a poor choice for families with young children. The Brussels Griffon is an active breed, always on the lookout for action. The rough coat needs combing two or three times weekly, plus professional grooming every three months.

Grooming for the smooth coat is minimal, consisting only of occasional brushing to remove dead hair. Major concerns: none Minor concerns: none Occasionally seen: weak bladder, patellar luxation, distichiasis, cataracts, PRA, CHD, Legg-Perthes Suggested tests: eye, (hip), knee Life span: 1215 years Note: Caesarean sections are often required. Note: While the characteristics mentioned here may frequently represent this breed, dogs are individuals whose personalities and appearances will vary.

Please consult the adoption organization for details on a specific pet.

Do short haired Brussels Griffons shed?

He doesn’t shed seasonally. According to the American Brussels Griffon Association, each hair in his coat grows between 3 and 4 inches, then dies off, replaced by a new hair from the follicle. These hairs don’t all shed at once. He needs frequent grooming to keep his hair from ending up all over the house.

Are Brussels Griffons rare?

Small but sturdy, Brussels Griffons are generally a healthy breed, due to the fact that they remain fairly uncommon.

Are short haired Brussels Griffons hypoallergenic?

Are Brussels Griffon Hypoallergenic Dogs? Yes, they are! With little shedding, hardly any dander and little proclivity to slobber or drool—they’re a wonderfully compact hypoallergenic doggie!

Tipping the scales at no more than 12 pounds, this human-like toy of complex character has enough personality for 10 ordinary dogs. A sensitive companion for discerning grownups, the Brussels Griffon is smart, devoted, and comically self-important.

Petit Brabancons”Fanchastic the Great (or “Chas” for short, brown dog) at 3 years old and Dr. Perry Cox (or “Perry” for short, black dog) at 2 years old are both of the smooth hair variety, although Perry’s coat is a bit less traditional than Chas’s. Perry’s coat is between a smooth and a long haired Brussels Griffon. We’re not exactly sure why his coat is like that, but we love him just the same.”

Smooth hair variety Griffon, Petit BrabanconFanchastic the Great (or “Chas” for short) at 3 years old

Originally bred to hunt and kill rats, this former Belgian street dog is a distinctive and unusual dog breed. Although the Brussels Griffon is small, theyre hardly a pampered pooch. Affectionate and lively, their intelligence, sense of humor, and air of self-importance keep them one step ahead of their people, who adore their pups anyway.

Breed isn’t the only factor that goes into affection levels; dogs who were raised inside a home with people around feel more comfortable with humans and bond more easily. Mouthy dogs are more likely to use their mouths to hold or “herd” their human family members, and they need training to learn that it’s fine to gnaw on chew toys, but not on people.

These breeds generally aren’t a good fit for homes with smaller pets that can look like prey, such as cats, hamsters, or small dogs. Originally bred to perform a canine job of some sort, such as retrieving game for hunters or herding livestock, they have the stamina to put in a full workday. When picking a breed, consider your own activity level and lifestyle, and think about whether you’ll find a frisky, energetic dog invigorating or annoying.

The Griffons’ flat face, prominent chin, and large, wide-set eyes have led to many comparisons to the Ewoks or Wookie creatures in Star Wars . Look for a reputable breeder who tests her breeding dogs to make sure they’re free of genetic diseases that they might pass onto the puppies, and that they have sound temperaments. Brussels Griffons trace their roots back to Belgium, where small, terrier-like dogs were bred to hunt and kill vermin in stables, especially those of horse-drawn hansom cabs–the equivalent of today’s taxi in the cities.

The Affenpinscher contributed the size and wiry coat texture, while the Toy Spaniel influence is seen in the large, expressive eyes, rounded head, and upturned underjaw. Marie Henriette, Belgium’s queen and a dog enthusiast, fell in love with the little Griffon Bruxellois and began breeding them and promoting them in Europe and abroad. By the end of World War II, Brussels Griffons were nearly extinct in their country of origin, Belgium, but they hung on in England, thanks to the efforts of English breeders.

The Brussels Griffon has a bossy streak and will run the household whenever he’s allowed to, but beneath that tough-dog exterior he’s a softie who loves being with his people and is in constant need of their time and attention. Inviting visitors over regularly, and taking him to busy parks, stores that allow dogs, and on leisurely strolls to meet neighbors will also help him polish his social skills. Hip dysplasia is hereditary, but it can also be triggered by environmental factors, such as rapid growth from a high-calorie diet or injuries incurred from jumping or falling on slick floors.

Veterinary care includes giving your Griffon supplements and medicines to help prevent or lessen the pain of arthritis and, in severe cases, surgery. His intelligence and athletic ability make the Griffon a contender in dog sports such as agility, obedience, and even tracking, as long as you persuade him that it’s worthwhile. Short, neatly trimmed nails keep the feet in good condition and prevent your legs from getting scratched when your Griffon enthusiastically jumps up to greet you.

Make grooming a positive experience filled with praise and rewards, and you’ll lay the groundwork for easy veterinary exams and other handling when he’s an adult.

History

A product of Belgium, the Brussels Griffon’s forebears were probably the Affenpinscher and a Belgian street dog, the Griffon d’Ecurie (Stable Griffon). The breed gained favor as a guard of cabs in Brussels, where their cocky but comic demeanor was probably more effective at attracting riders than dissuading robbers. In the late 1800s, this mixture was then crossed with the Pug, at that time extremely popular in neighboring Holland. The Pug mixes account for the brachycephalic head type and for the smooth-coated individuals of the breed, known then (and still in some countries) as the Petit Brabancon. The smooths were not initially accepted, since griffon means wiry.By 1880, the breed was sufficiently established to be recognized at Belgian dog shows. Around this same time there is some suggestion that additional mixes were made with the Yorkshire Terrier and English Toy Spaniel, the latter further contributing to the Brussels Griffon’s head configuration. By the early 1900s, the little street urchin had risen to the heights of popularity in Belgium and found itself in great demand by nobility. Although the breed’s numbers were decimated by World War I, the breed recovered and has since gained ardent admirers around the world.In some countries, only the red rough-coated dogs are classified as the Brussels Griffon; black rough-coated dogs are known as the Belgian Griffon; and smooth-coated dogs are known as the Petit Brabancon.

Temperament

The spunky Brussels Griffon is full of himself, brimming with self-confidence and gusto. These dogs are bold, playful, stubborn, and mischievous. They are usually good with other dogs and pets. They tend to bark and climb, and some can be escape artists. Brussels Griffons make saucy companions for a family wanting an entertaining, sensitive pet. However, sensitivity and size make them a poor choice for families with young children. They can be difficult to housetrain and may suffer from separation anxiety.

Upkeep

The Brussels Griffon is an active breed, always on the lookout for action. They need daily mental and physical stimulation, but their small size makes such stimulation possible with a robust indoor game. They also enjoy a short walk on leash. The rough coat needs combing two or three times weekly, plus professional grooming every three months. Grooming for the smooth coat is minimal, consisting only of occasional brushing to remove dead hair.

Who’s Who of the Small Dog Breeds

Check out the cutest small dog breeds. Learn which are good with children and which make good apartment dogs.

Who’s Who of the Small Dog Breeds

Check out the cutest small dog breeds. Learn which are good with children and which make good apartment dogs.

Brussels Griffon

Originally bred to hunt and kill rats, this former Belgian street dog is a distinctive and unusual dog breed. Although the Brussels Griffon is small, they’re hardly a pampered pooch. Affectionate and lively, their intelligence, sense of humor, and air of self-importance keep them one step ahead of their people, who adore their pups anyway.Although these are purebred dogs, you may still find them in shelters and rescues. Remember toGriffons adapt well to apartment life, but the neighbors might not appreciate this tiny watchdog’s tendency to sound off at any sign of what they believe to be trouble. These dogs also have quite a bit of energy for their size and need lots of exercise and playtime. Novice pet parents who expect a docile lapdog might find that this pup doesn’t sit still as long as they were hoping. But humans who can meet the breed’s needs and keep up with training will be rewarded with a loving, loyal family member.See below for complete list of dog breed traits and facts about Brussels Griffons!