Shih Tzu Lhasa Apso?

The Lhasa Apso and the Shih Tzu have a closely linked history, and it is believed that the Shih Tzu is a descendant of the Lhasa Apso, and this is one of the main reasons as to why they are so similar in their appearance.

They are both adorable pups who, if welcomed into the right home, will thrive in their environment and make a great family pet. Height 10-11 Inches Weight 12-18 Pounds Temperament Confident, Smart, Fun Energy Low Health Average Lifespan 12-15 Years Price $600 and Up

The Lhasa Apso and the Shih Tzu are ancient breeds that originate from Tibetan and Chinese lands, and throughout history, their journeys have been intertwined with one another. Shortly after, the first Lhasa Apso was registered by the American Kennel Club (AKC) in 1935, and while they are still a rare breed today, they make a wonderful family pet. It is believed that the Shih Tzu was born as a result of crossbreeding a Lhasa Apso with a Pekingnese , and it remains unknown as to whether he was created in either Tibet or in China.

Regardless of where he was born, he has appeared throughout history on many paintings and carvings, thus suggesting that he has always been a treasured canine amongst royalty and rich nobility. Though both breeds are very similar in appearance, the biggest difference is their coats.The Lhasa Apso and the Shih Tzu are very similar-looking pooches , so dont be too harsh on yourself if you cannot tell them apart. They both have very similar coats, in that their long and luxurious locks traditionally fall to the floor, and it is their hair that is their signature feature !

The Lhasa Apso has a longer muzzle that leads to a narrower skull, and he has slightly smaller eyes than the Shih Tzu. The Lhasa Apso is a medium energy dog who requires around 30 minutes of exercise a day, whereas the Shih Tzu is a very low energy dog who will require a few short walks around the block for a leg stretch and a toilet break. They will both happily use your living room as an exercise studio throughout the day and will enjoy the occasional romp in the backyard to keep themselves occupied.

The Lhasa Apso, being the more energetic and livelier pup, will need a bit more mental stimulation in between exercise sessions, so interactive games with his family or giving him treat-filled puzzle toys is advised. His guarding tendencies need to be addressed, and the best way to tackle this is through early socialization with as many strangers and dogs of all shapes and sizes. The Shih Tzu is somewhat easier to train , and despite the odd tantrum here and there, he is generally more laid back than the Lhasa Apso.

Renal Dysplasia this is a genetic defect of the kidneys, which causes a variety of symptoms and a lot of discomfort and pain for the pup. In addition to the above, the Lhasa Apso suffers from Sebaceous Adenitis , which is a serious skin condition that can lead to a variety of infections, and as a result, they will experience pain and omit an unpleasant odor. The Shih Tzu is predisposed to Portosystemic liver shunts , whereby the kidney does not effectively cleanse his blood as it should.

It is commonly believed by many in the canine world that the Lhasa Apso and the Shih Tzu are hypoallergenic dogs, however, this is a myth . As the Lhasa Apso and the Shih Tzu are related, they are very similar-looking pups, however, they do have a few differences when it comes to their temperament, exercise, and training needs.

What is the difference between a Shih Tzu and a Lhasa Apso?

The Lhasa Apso is bigger than the Shih Tzu. This is the most obvious physical difference between the two breeds. … Apart from their sizes, a Lhasa Apso has a longer nose, narrower skull, and smaller almond-shaped eyes. Meanwhile, a Shih Tzu has a broader skull with large, round eyes.

How much is a Shih Tzu and Lhasa Apso mix?

Shih Apso puppies coming from a reputable breeder cost somewhere in the ballpark of $250 to $1,000. The ultimate cost depends on the breeder, the area you live, and the quality of the puppies.

Is Shih Tzu or Lhasa Apso better?

The Lhasa Apso will suit a more active family and one who can handle his complex personality and guarding tendencies. Whereas the Shih Tzu would prefer a calmer household that will be willing to pay him a lot of attention! But whoever you choose, they are both equally loving and affectionate.

What is bad about Lhasa Apso?

What is bad about Lhasa Apso? Behavior problems are minimal, but the Lhasa Apso can be a little headstrong and stubborn, which may make it slightly difficult to train. The coat can also require a lot of effort to maintain.

Lhasa Apsos and Shih Tzus are both ancient small breeds from Asia with a shared bloodlinebut what are the differences between them? In this informational post, we compare the history, personality traits, activity level, and health of these two commonly confused breeds.

Shih Tzus were originally a cross between Lhasa Apso and the Pekingese and were brought from Tibet to China as a gift for Chinese emperors. As companions to royalty, they were bred with fanciful and jester-esque features to earn another name, chrysanthemum dog, due to their coats of many colors and their hair that grows like flower petals around their faces.

Beyond the chrysanthemum facial hair, Shih Tzus have long flowing double coats and their tails curl over their backs. Theyre cautious around strangers and have a ready bark to alarm you of an intruder, which may include your friend who approaches without a proper introduction. According to the American Kennel Club, theyre highly intelligent, willful toddlers. Theyre better dogs for a household with older children or adults, as they have poor reactions to hair, ear, and tail pulling.

If you happen to miss a day of exercise, theyll gladly use the length of your apartment as a track field and your furniture as makeshift hurdles to get their wiggles out. On the other hand, Shih Tzus are the Hufflepuffs: people pleasers who respond well to praise and positive reinforcement. As cute as your dog might be when stealing your shoes or jumping up to take a snack from the table, remember to ignore their antics and reward them when theyre good.

Shih Tzus are known to have patellar luxation, cataracts, retinal detachment, corneal dryness, and eye inflammation. Your Shih Tzu will benefit from daily grooming, including brushing and gently washing the corners of their eyes with a damp cloth. Whether youre drawn to the Lhasa Apso or Shih Tzu, these ancient breeds both make perfect apartment pals or palace pets.

Theyre adorable. Those small, sturdy dogs with their regal bearing and long, gorgeous coats. But which breed are you admiring? The Shih Tzu (pronounced sheed-zoo or sheet-su) or the Lhasa Apso? To the untrained eye, it can be hard to tell these two dogs apart, especially in full coat. But in fact, although these breeds have a connected heritage, they have different physical traits and personalities. Read on to learn more about these delightful dogs, their similarities, and what distinguishes them from each other.

They have a sturdy, narrower body with great lung capacity, a longer less square muzzle to warm up the cold air when breathing, well-featured short legs, and a harsher double coat protecting them from the varying temperatures. According to the breed standard , the Shih Tzus sole function is as a companion and therefore they have a friendly, outgoing, happy, affectionate, and trusting temperament.

The Lhasa Apsos standard describes them as happy and assertive but wary of strangers thanks to being bred as a guardian or sentinel dog in the Buddhist monasteries.

Appearance

The Shih Tzu’s history is rather mysterious and much less documented than the Lhasa Apsos. It is believed that the Shih Tzu was born as a result ofRegardless of where he was born, he has appeared throughout history on many paintings and carvings, thus suggesting that he has always been aBreed fanciers first took the Shih Tzu to America in the

Temperament

It is their temperament that is normallyThe Lhasa Apso is aloof with strangers and will not take kindly to a stranger entering his master’s yard, whereas the Shih Tzu, who might let out a few barks, will bark out of excitement. If it is aThe Shih Tzu is extremely friendly with anyone who will pay him attention, and boy does he love to be theHe enjoys being stroked on his master’s lap and will readily accept strangers onto his estate without any distrust. If you are seeking aDespite their personality differences, with their immediate family, they are

Exercise

The Lhasa Apso and the Shih Tzu differ in their exercise needs. The Lhasa Apso is a medium energy dog who requires aroundThey will both happily use your living room as an exercise studio throughout the day and will enjoy theAside from his basic exercise needs, the Shih Tzu is happy to sleep on laps all day long, with the occasional leg stretch pushing himself off one lap onto the next. The Lhasa Apso, being the more energetic and livelier pup, will need a bit more

Training

The Lhasa Apso has a somewhatIf he displays any undesirable behaviors that you cannot correct yourself, then it is advised to enroll your dog intoThe Shih Tzu is somewhat

Health

Neither breeds are recommended to be tested for any health issues in particular according to the national breed clubs; however, they are both predisposed to the following health issues:In addition to the above, the Lhasa Apso suffers fromThe Shih Tzu is predisposed toGenerally, however, both the Lhasa Apso and the Shih Tzu are

Grooming

A Lhasa Apso or a Shih Tzu who will be entered into conformation shows should keep theirHowever, if you want for an easier coat to look after, which is called aIt is commonly believed by many in the canine world that the Lhasa Apso and the Shih Tzu are hypoallergenic dogs, however, this isIf you are seeking a hypoallergenic pup, then the Maltese or a Malti-poo is similarly sized and he is better suited for those with allergies.

Puppy Prices

Similar to their size differences, there is little difference in their prices, with the Lhasa Apso being ever so slightly cheaper than the Shih Tzu. The average price of a Lhasa Apso starts fromIt is likely that the Lhasa Apso is slightly cheaper because he is much less popular. Of course, as with any pup, if you want a specific look or a dog from an award-winning lineage, then you can expect to pay more.If you are certain that these guys would fit in with your lifestyle then the American Lhasa Apso Club lists reputable breeders state by state, and the American Shih Tzu Club also lists reputable breeders state by state, and both of these websites are invaluable for information on their respective breeds.

Breed History

The history of the Lhasa Apso and the Shih Tzu goes way, way back. Back over a thousand years to Tibet, where Lhasa Apsos were guardians of the inner sanctuaries of Buddhist monasteries. Their service as alarm dogs to the monks, plus the Lhasa Apso’s lion-like appearance, explain the meaning behind their name of “bark lion sentinel dog.”Shih Tzus were originally a cross between Lhasa Apso and the Pekingese and were brought from Tibet to China as a gift for Chinese emperors. The name Shih Tzu roughly translated means “little lion dog.” In the palaces of the Chinese emperors, these little lion dogs were interbred with short-faced Chinese breeds like the Chinese pug or Pekinese. As companions to royalty, they were bred with fanciful and jester-esque features to earn another name, “chrysanthemum dog,” due to their coats of many colors and their hair that grows like flower petals around their faces.

Appearance

Since Lhasa Apsos are a parent breed to Shih Tzus, it’s no wonder they’re so commonly confused with one another.

Size

Both are small dogs. However, the Lhasa Apso is slightly larger at 10-11 inches in height and 12-18 pounds in weight compared to the Shih Tzu’s height of 9-10.5 inches and weight of 9-16 pounds.

Coat

Both have long coats. Lhasa Apso coats are floor length and flat-hanging, traditionally parted in the middle. They have feathery tails and extravagant facial hair, with cultivated whiskers and beards that make up their lion-like appearance.Beyond the chrysanthemum facial hair, Shih Tzus have long flowing double coats and their tails curl over their backs.

Color

The colors of a Lhasa Apso’s fur are typically gold and white, black, black and tan, red, cream, and white. A Shih Tzu’s coat can come in even more colors: gold and white, red and white, black mask gold, solid red, black and white, solid black, solid liver, liver and white, blue and white, brindle and white and silver and white.

Personality

Owing to their ancestry as protectors, both breeds are barkers as well as companion dogs who prefer the indoors. Both can be effectively trained as therapy dogs.Lhasa Apsos were bred as sentinels for monasteries, so they’re more of an indoor watchdog. They’re cautious around strangers and have a ready bark to alarm you of an intruder, which may include your friend who approaches without a proper introduction.Lhasa Apsos are affectionate with their family and happy to receive as little or as much attention as you can give. They’re born with an independent streak. According to the American Kennel Club, they’re highly intelligent, “willful toddlers.” They’re better dogs for a household with older children or adults, as they have poor reactions to hair, ear, and tail pulling. Early socialization with other dogs is also advised.Shih Tzus are lap dogs whose goal in life is to please their people. As former pets of royalty, they love to be spoiled but are pleased with any attention you can give. They’re outgoing, playful, and affectionate—good with both kids and dogs. To remind you how much they love being around you, they’ve been known to mischievously run off with their favorite family member’s shoes.

Activity

Both are excellent apartment dogs, as they only require moderate exercise. Once a day walks or a daily playtime will keep them in fine form. If you happen to miss a day of exercise, they’ll gladly use the length of your apartment as a track field and your furniture as makeshift hurdles to get their wiggles out.

Training

Lhasa Apsos are the Ravenclaws of the dog world: highly intelligent dogs who respond well to consistency and leadership. On the other hand, Shih Tzus are the Hufflepuffs: people pleasers who respond well to praise and positive reinforcement. Spoil them when they’re good and ignore them when they misbehave.Punishment or harsh discipline will backfire with these two. If a Lhasa Apso feels bullied, you’ll have an impetuously stubborn dog on your hands. If a Shih Tzu feels bullied, they’re likely to curl up and sulk. As cute as your dog might be when stealing your shoes or jumping up to take a snack from the table, remember to ignore their antics and reward them when they’re good.

Health

Things to look out for with both these breeds are eye issues (progressive retinal atrophy) and hip dysplasia.The most serious health issue that a Lhasa Apso may have is hereditary kidney dysfunction. While other issues include dry eye, slipping stifles, and cherry eye.Shih Tzus are known to have patellar luxation, cataracts, retinal detachment, corneal dryness, and eye inflammation.

Grooming

Lhasa Apsos and Shih Tzus are infrequent shedders, however, their dander can cause allergies. Just something to keep in mind if you’ve been told that these treasured dogs are hypoallergenic. The long coats of these companion dogs require regular grooming, for health as well as style.Bathe your Lhasa Apso at least every two weeks and brush once or more between baths. Keep your dog’s nails trimmed and ears cleaned weekly.Your Shih Tzu will benefit from daily grooming, including brushing and gently washing the corners of their eyes with a damp cloth. Baths every three to four weeks will keep your Shih Tzu’s coat is good shape. Remember to keep up with regular nail trimming and ear cleaning. Brush this dog’s hair back into a topknot or keep it short to protect their eyes from irritation.Whether you’re drawn to the Lhasa Apso or Shih Tzu, these ancient breeds both make perfect apartment pals or palace pets. Lhasa Apsos will act as protectors of the realm (i.e. your home) while Shih Tzus will treat you like royalty with constant love and affection.

Similar at First Glance

According to Richard Paquette, Shih Tzu breeder and Canadian Kennel Club All Breed judge, both breeds are quite similar in appearance with their overall rectangular body shape and long, beautiful, double coats. “So much so that early Shih Tzu were erroneously registered as Lhasa when introduced to the USA in the early 1940’s.”Don Hanson, Lhasa Apso breeder and AKC Judge of several Toy and Non-Sporting breeds, agrees that the public often mixes up the two dogs. “Both breeds, in full coat, do attract attention, and from a distance may appear similar. But closer examination reveals some clear similarities and differences.”Hanson believes those similarities are many. He says both breeds make great companions and pets, thanks in part to their wonderful, although different, personalities. They can also both live happily in small homes or apartments and each requires frequent grooming to maintain the long coat.There are structural resemblances as well. For example, they are close in size with the Shih Tzu being no less than 8 and no more than 11 inches at the shoulder and the Lhasa Apso being slightly larger at between 10 and 11 inches tall. And Hanson says, “Both are sturdy little dogs carrying good weight and substance for their size, but not overexaggerated. Both breeds carry their tails over the back in a curl.”

A Connected Heritage

These similarities no doubt originate from the fact that the Shih Tzu was developed from the Lhasa Apso. The Lhasa Apso, originally from Tibet, takes part of its name from Lhasa, the capital of Tibet. According to Hanson, “The Lhasa Apso is a very ancient breed, tracing as far back as 800 A.D. when Buddhism took root. They were cherished by the Tibetan people and served as companions to the Dalai Lamas in the temples. Because of their acute hearing, they alerted the Dalai Lamas to an intrusion and were often accompanied by Tibetan Terriers, with the Tibetan Mastiffs providing protection outside the temples.”In contrast, the Shih Tzu was developed in the luxurious Imperial Palaces of Chinese royalty. Paquette explains, “The history of the Shih Tzu is steeped in mystery. Legends, documents, paintings, and art objects reference a Shih Tzu-like dog during the Tang Dynasty of 618-907 A.D. The most likely source of our modern Shih Tzu is dogs brought from Tibet to the Chinese court in the 16th and 17th centuries. Shih Tzu means ‘lion dog’ and these early Lhasa-like dogs were bred with Pekingese in the palaces of the Forbidden City in Beijing.”

Differences in Personality and Physical Structure

Besides the fact that the Shih Tzu is part of the Toy Group and the Lhasa Apso is a member of the Non-Sporting Group, there are physical differences between them. For example, Hanson points out that although both breeds have dense double coats, the Lhasa’s is heavy, straight, and hard compared to the Shih Tzu’s luxurious and flowing coat.Paquette feels each breed has been shaped by its heritage. The Shih Tzu was influenced by the Pekingese used in its development, whereas the build of the Lhasa Apso was influenced by their original environment, the rugged and elevated terrain of Tibet. “The Lhasa Apso is a true survivalist dog and they have adapted well to these harsh conditions. They have a sturdy, narrower body with great lung capacity, a longer less square muzzle to warm up the cold air when breathing, well-featured short legs, and a harsher double coat protecting them from the varying temperatures.”Perhaps the most important difference between the two breeds is their personality, which also follows from their original purpose. According to the breed standard, the Shih Tzu’s sole function is as a companion and therefore they have a friendly, outgoing, happy, affectionate, and trusting temperament. The Lhasa Apso’s standard describes them as happy and assertive but wary of strangers thanks to being bred as a guardian or sentinel dog in the Buddhist monasteries.