Shih Tzu Bichon Frise?

Shichons are playful and love games and fun and getting lots of attention! He is a bold and friendly dog who is well suited to live with most people. As long as you can give a little time each day outside, and play with him in or outside too along with lap time and love he will be happy.

He can be found in Spanish, English and French courts and continued to be favored for several hundred years. He does have an independent side but still can suffer from separation anxiety if left alone for long periods.

They were treasured as companion dogs and can be found in paintings and documents across Tibetan and Chinese history. The Shichon is an alert dog, quite bold and lively and while he is affectionate and loyal he also has an independent streak. He is intelligent and since he craves attention and loves to spend time with you he tends to be easy to train.

The Shichon is an easy dog to live with and is friendly forming strong bonds with family members. The Shichin is a small dog weighing 8 to 25 pounds and standing 9 to 12 inches tall. He can have a double coat with a fine and silky under and a long wavy to curly outer.

Colors can include white, cream, black, silver, apricot, red and chocolate. He has almond shaped eyes, hanging down ears that are feathered and a head that is well proportioned to his body. He is easy to train because he is intelligent, eager to please and loves to spend time with you getting attention and praise.

Be patient and firm with your training but also keep it positive, treats, rewards and praise are the way to reach him. The Shichon is low shedding and is considered to be hypoallergenic but you should visit the puppy with the person with allergies if that is an important factor for your dog. He will need to have his coat brushed regularly, at least every couple of days to keep it tangle free and looking healthy.

Typically the Shichin is good with children and other dogs and pets especially with early socialization and if raised with them. He will need to be fed to 2 cups of good quality dry dog food each day. Viisting the puppy before buying is a good way of seeing the conditions he is kept in and the general health of the other animals there which can help you avoid ending up with a sickly dog.

Other costs that you may have to cover as well as the tests and micro chip are shots, neutering, a crate, carrier, collar and leash which come to between $360 to $400. Ongoing costs for food, license, training, toys and treats each year could fall between $300 to $400. Basic medical needs each year for things like vaccinations, flea prevention, check ups and pet insurance fall between $435 to $550.

Are Bichon Shih Tzu good dogs?

Bichon Shih Tzu Mix Temperament & Personality. The Shichon is a perfect family dog, and it gets along well with children. In terms of their temperament, they are friendly, social, playful, energetic, and often clingy.

Do Shih Tzu bichons bark a lot?

Do Shih Tzu Bichons Bark A Lot? Shih Tzu Bichons aren’t excessively noisy dogs, but they will bark to let you know that a stranger has arrived or an intruder’s in the yard. It’s nothing like the Chihuahua, however, or the Pomeranian, both of which have big personalities and loud and insistent voices.

What is a Shih Tzu cross Bichon Frise called?

The Shichon is a mix between a Shih Tzu and a Bichon Frise. © Shutterstock. Cross a cuddle-crazed Shih Tzu with a brainy Bichon Frise and you may just have discovered the perfect dog: not too large and not too small with a heady mixture of good looks and loyalty.

Do Shih Tzu Bichons shed?

Shichons are an excellent choice for those who suffer from allergies, as these are considered very low shedders. Daily brushing to avoid matting of the hair is important. Shichons commonly suffer from separation anxiety if left alone frequently or for extended periods of time.

A mix between the Shih Tzu and the Bichon Frise, the Zuchon (also called the Shichon and Teddy Bear Zuchon) is a tiny designer dog that packs a lot of love.

If youre thinking about bringing a Zuchon dog into your familyor if youve recently brought one homeheres everything you need to know about this small but mighty breed. Origin: United States Size: small Lifespan: 15-18 years Energy Level: high Breed Group: toy dog/designer dog

One thing you can almost always count on, though, is that your Zuchon will have a big, fluffy coatthats what gave it the teddy bear nickname, after all. According to the American Kennel Club, Shih Tzus grow to be between nine and 10.5 inches tall, and weigh anywhere between nine and 16 pounds. According to Pet Guide , they need to be brushed every few days to avoid knots and tangles in their coats, though that can be reduced if their hair is kept short.

Taking after that parent breed, youll find the Zuchon is smart and charming and able to use all of those qualities to their advantage. They have high amounts of energy and love to play, but they can also be pretty laid back when its time to rest. Zuchons make excellent watchdogs and are always ready to alert you of intruders or new people in the area.

Since Zuchon dogs are small, they can get most of the exercise they need by following their person around the house and chasing a ball around the living room floor or playing a game of tug-of-war. Shih Tzus are known to be especially loving with children, so theres a good chance your Zuchon will display this trait and make for a great playmate for even the youngest members of your household. While they can get most of their exercise at home, Zuchons still need daily walks or trips to the dog park to help them burn through all of their energy.

While its impossible to predict whether a Zuchon puppy will grow into a healthy adult dog, chances for that are good. According to the Institute of Canine Biology , a recent study has shown that mixed-breed dogs are less likely to fall victim to genetic disorders than their purebred counterparts. While this is great news, its important to understand that Zuchon dogs are still at risk for any disease or disorder thats common in their parent breeds.

Shih Tzus may be susceptible to hip dysplasia, though good breeders should screen for this. Both the Bichon Frise and Shih Tzus are predisposed to a dislocated knee cap and a wide range of eye disorders. Unfortunately, their second act of fame ended after the world wars, when many Bichon Frise again found themselves out on the streets.

Its important to meet the breeder or rescue organization in person, as well as the dog, before any money is exchanged. All of this greatly reduces the cost of ownership for youas does the adoption fee, which is usually much cheaper than the price of purchasing a Zuchon from a breeder.

The Shichon is a mixed breed doga cross between the Shih Tzu and the Bichon Frise dog breeds. Affectionate, intelligent, and outgoing, these pups inherited some of the best qualities from both of their parents.

Breed isn’t the only factor that goes into affection levels; dogs who were raised inside a home with people around feel more comfortable with humans and bond more easily. Mouthy dogs are more likely to use their mouths to hold or “herd” their human family members, and they need training to learn that it’s fine to gnaw on chew toys, but not on people.

Originally bred to perform a canine job of some sort, such as retrieving game for hunters or herding livestock, they have the stamina to put in a full workday. When picking a breed, consider your own activity level and lifestyle, and think about whether you’ll find a frisky, energetic dog invigorating or annoying. A game of fetch, a bit of chasing kids around the yard, and a daily half hour walk will help to keep your pet at a healthy body weight.

They love their families so much, in fact, that they are known to be a bit on the clingy side and quite commonly suffer from separation anxiety if left alone frequently or for extended periods of time. The positive side to these pups being so close to their humans, is that they are extremely intuitive creatures and make very popular therapy and emotional support animals . The Shichon is a fairly healthy mixed breed but did inherit a few of the common health issues carried by their Shih Tzu and Bichon Frise parents.

Shichons have energy levels on the higher end, so it’s important to make sure that your pup gets the right amount of exercise since this mix can be prone to obesity. A game of fetch, a bit of chasing kids around the yard, and a daily half hour walk will help to keep your pet at a healthy body weight. These soft coats will continue to grow until trimmed so daily brushing to avoid matting of the hair is important, as well as scheduling regular grooming appointments.

Also known as the Zuchon or the Shichon, the Bichon Shih Tzu gives you the best of two popular dog breeds the Shih Tzu and the Bichon Frise, wrapped up in one irresistibly cuddly canine.

Where does the Shichon come from?

The Shichon is a designer dog, part of a group of dogs who are deliberately bred mixed breeds. Owning a designer dog has become a very popular trend in recent years, you can find many celebrities too with designer dogs which has boosted the popularity of owning one among the public. Over the last 30 years more breeders are creating more cross breeds. Some of these breeders are doing so with care but a lot are bad breeders and puppy mills just taking advantage of the trend to make money. When buying a puppy like this take care and do some research first.There is not much known about the origins of this dog, who first bred him and why. He is a more recent one and it is thought he originates in the US in the last 10 years. To get a better understanding of what goes into him we can look at the parents looks and temperaments, though it is important to note here that genetics cannot be controlled with this kind of breeding and there can be no guarantees when it comes to which parents they are more like or which characteristics they inherit.

The Bichon Frise

The Bichon Frise is believed to descend from the Barbet but precise origins are not known. When he came to Europe he was very popular with the aristocracy as a companion dog. He can be found in Spanish, English and French courts and continued to be favored for several hundred years. In the late 19th century his popularity fell and he became a common dog. Many circuses and organ grinders had one as a performing dog. They learned tricks very well and were cute to look at.Today this dog is one of the happiest dogs could own. He loves attention, has to be at the center of everything and is a great charmer, able to win everyone over. He does have an independent side but still can suffer from separation anxiety if left alone for long periods. He is playful and clever and is a quick learner.

The Shih-Tzu

The ShihTzu is thought to be in the top 14 oldest breeds around, coming from either Tibet or China. They were treasured as companion dogs and can be found in paintings and documents across Tibetan and Chinese history. They were referred to as little lion dogs and were docile, intelligent and happy. The first breeding pair to leave China and come to England happened in 1928.In 1969 he was recognized as a breed by the American Kennel Club.The ShihTzu today is still very much a companion dog. He wants to please and be with you, he is very affectionate and loves to receive it too. He will spend as much time as he can in your lap and is a happy little dog when he has lots of attention. He can be lively and likes to play and is friendly too.

Temperament

The Shichon is an alert dog, quite bold and lively and while he is affectionate and loyal he also has an independent streak. He loves to play and be with people so does not do well when separated for long periods. He is intelligent and since he craves attention and loves to spend time with you he tends to be easy to train. He makes a great family dog as he usually gets along well with everyone especially with early socialization. The Shichon is an easy dog to live with and is friendly forming strong bonds with family members. He is a sweet, funny and loving dog.

What does the Shichon look like

The Shichin is a small dog weighing 8 to 25 pounds and standing 9 to 12 inches tall. He can look like either parent or be more of a mix. He can have a double coat with a fine and silky under and a long wavy to curly outer. Colors can include white, cream, black, silver, apricot, red and chocolate. His face looks much like a teddy bear’s which is why he is sometimes named so. He has almond shaped eyes, hanging down ears that are feathered and a head that is well proportioned to his body.

Does he train quickly?

He is easy to train because he is intelligent, eager to please and loves to spend time with you getting attention and praise. Some can be a little harder to house train though so this is something you may have to spend more time on. Early socialization and training are important to make him the best dog he can be. Be patient and firm with your training but also keep it positive, treats, rewards and praise are the way to reach him. Avoid harsh tones, becoming impatient and physical punishment, he will not respond well to it.

How much grooming is needed?

The Shichon is low shedding and is considered to be hypoallergenic but you should visit the puppy with the person with allergies if that is an important factor for your dog. He will need to have his coat brushed regularly, at least every couple of days to keep it tangle free and looking healthy. When he gets really dirty he can have a bath but otherwise try to avoid bathing too regularly as it can affect the natural oils in his skin. For that reason too only use a gentle dog shampoo. His ears will need checking and wiping clean once a week, his teeth will need a brush at least twice a week and his toe nails clipping when they get too long.

General information

He is alert and will bark to let you know if someone is entering the home so can be a good watchdog. He does not bark a lot but will bark occasionally. He will need to be fed ½ to 2 cups of good quality dry dog food each day. This amount should be split into at least two meals.

Health Concerns

There are health concerns that he can inherit from his parents if they are not screened and you do not ask to see parental health clearances before buying. These issues include Bladder problems, patellar luxation, kidney problems, vaccination sensitivity, eye problems, umbilical hernia, liver problems, Allergies, hip dysplasia, ear infections, dental problems, snuffles and reverse sneezing. Viisting the puppy before buying is a good way of seeing the conditions he is kept in and the general health of the other animals there which can help you avoid ending up with a sickly dog.

Costs involved in owning a Shichon

A Shichon puppy could cost between $350 to $1250. Some breeders include things like deworming, blood tests, chipping and other things along with their price. Some do not. Other costs that you may have to cover as well as the tests and micro chip are shots, neutering, a crate, carrier, collar and leash which come to between $360 to $400. Ongoing costs for food, license, training, toys and treats each year could fall between $300 to $400. Basic medical needs each year for things like vaccinations, flea prevention, check ups and pet insurance fall between $435 to $550.

Zuchon Grooming

As far as grooming goes, Zuchons don’t require as much effort as you might think. According to Pet Guide, they need to be brushed every few days to avoid knots and tangles in their coats, though that can be reduced if their hair is kept short.A popular style for Zuchons is a tight cut called a teddy bear cut (are you seeing a theme yet?), and a short cut like that will reduce—or even eliminate—the need for frequent brushing.

Zuchon Personality

Don’t let their small size fool you. Zuchon dogs are known for having big personalities, and you can thank their Bichon Frise bloodline for that. Taking after that parent breed, you’ll find the Zuchon is smart and charming… and able to use all of those qualities to their advantage.Zuchons are also very social dogs, and they’re great with most people and animals. They’re eager to please you (and everyone else), and very much enjoy being the star of the show. They have high amounts of energy and love to play, but they can also be pretty laid back when it’s time to rest.Basically, Zuchons are the best of both worlds.Zuchons make excellent watchdogs and are always ready to alert you of intruders or new people in the area. Thankfully though, that’s about the only time they bark. Zuchons are not particularly yappy dogs—an unusual (and glorious) trait for a tiny dog.

Ideal Environment

Since Zuchon dogs are small, they can get most of the exercise they need by following their person around the house and chasing a ball around the living room floor or playing a game of tug-of-war. For this reason, they thrive in small spaces and will do fine in an apartment.If you have a yard, it’s best that it be fenced. These smart dogs can find their way out if they really want to, so they should never be left unsupervised.

Ideal Human

Zuchons are great with people of all ages and even do well in homes with small children. Shih Tzus are known to be especially loving with children, so there’s a good chance your Zuchon will display this trait and make for a great playmate for even the youngest members of your household.While they can get most of their exercise at home, Zuchons still need daily walks or trips to the dog park to help them burn through all of their energy.

Training a Zuchon

Your Zuchon’s very best quality is also what makes her so easy to train—she just wants to keep you happy!Positive reinforcement should be your method of choice for this sensitive breed. They react well to praise and treats, but use harsh methods or discipline may have the opposite effect.Zuchons are very social animals, but you must start socializing them at a young age to make sure they live up to their abilities in this area. Take them to social settings, teach them to walk on leashes, and work on etiquette.Also, since Zuchons become so attached to their families, they tend to suffer from separation anxiety. This severe anxiety about being alone is not only unhealthy for the dog but also for the state of your home.Teach your Zuchon to be alone from puppyhood, leaving them at home alone for short periods of time. It may also be helpful to crate train your Zuchon.

Breed Health

While it’s impossible to predict whether a Zuchon puppy will grow into a healthy adult dog, chances for that are good. According to the Institute of Canine Biology, a recent study has shown that mixed-breed dogs are less likely to fall victim to genetic disorders than their purebred counterparts.While this is great news, it’s important to understand that Zuchon dogs are still at risk for any disease or disorder that’s common in their parent breeds. Shih Tzus may be susceptible to hip dysplasia, though good breeders should screen for this. Both the Bichon Frise and Shih Tzus are predisposed to a dislocated knee cap and a wide range of eye disorders.The Bichon also sometimes develops skin allergies and bladder infections.

Getting a Zuchon Dog

The Zuchon itself is a very new breed of dog that got its start in the United States. Since the breed is so new, there’s not much history to go with the Zuchon alone—to really understand the history of the Zuchon, you have to understand the origin of its parent breeds.The Shih Tzu is of Chinese origin, bred for Chinese emperors, probably by crossing the Lhaso Apso and Pekingese. The stayed spoiled in China until the 1930s when they were further refined by breeders in Peking and England. They were registered by the American Kennel Club in 1969 and have been a favorite toy breed of Americans ever since.The Bichon Frise started their development on the Canary Islands. They became popular with European royalty in the 13th Century, and we well-known by the Renaissance—though their days as royal lap days came to an end with the French Revolution in 1789. They were sent to live on the streets and came to be appreciated by street performers, who were enamored with their trainability.Unfortunately, their second act of fame ended after the world wars, when many Bichon Frise again found themselves out on the streets. Eventually, the breed’s qualities were recognized by the Societé Centrale Canine in 1933. The American Kennel Club accepted the Bichon Frise in 1971.

Zuchon Rescues

Since Zuchons are a new breed, there may not be a lot of options for finding one through a rescue organization, but it is possible. Diligent internet searching will turn up options for rescued Zuchons, but you may have to travel. If the organization isn’t in your local area, do your research and ask questions to make sure they’re reputable.There may be drawbacks to adopting a Zuchon through a rescue organization. It’s likely the dog you find will not be a puppy, and you may not be able to learn much about its past. However, its age may also be a plus—there’s a good chance an adult Zuchon will be house-trained, and it will likely have been socialized through the rescue. It will also have been spayed or neutered and will have received all of its required immunizations.All of this greatly reduces the cost of ownership for you—as does the adoption fee, which is usually much cheaper than the price of purchasing a Zuchon from a breeder.

Zuchon Breeders

It’s often difficult to find reputable Zuchon breeders since they are not a breed registered by the AKC, and therefore won’t be listed among their approved breeders. Before you commit to a breeder, ask around about them—your vet or other local breeders may be a good resource.When you visit, be sure to ask about any health issues in the dog’s bloodline, and discuss any genetic tests you might want to run.

Shichon

The Shichon is a mixed breed dog–a cross between the Shih Tzu and the Bichon Frise dog breeds. Affectionate, intelligent, and outgoing, these pups inherited some of the best qualities from both of their parents.Shichons go by a few other names including the Shih TzuBichon mix, Zuchon, and Teddy Bear dog. Despite their unfortunate status as a designer breed, you can find these mixed breed dogs in shelters as well, so remember to adopt! Don’t shop!These sweet pups are rather adaptable and are fit for apartment living, households with families, and single-person homes. They are the perfect companion animal for seniors, and their personalities and temperament make them excellent therapy dogs. If you want a companion who will follow you around your home and also protect their loved ones, the Shichon may be the right dog for you!See below for all Shichon facts and mixed dog breed characteristics!

The Origins of the Bichon Shih Tzu

Although the exact origins of this hybrid designer breed are unknown, it’s believed to have first appeared in the US around 20 to 30 years ago. The Bichon Shih Tzu is a cross between the Shih Tzu and the Bichon Frise, both of which were originally bred as companion dogs.Both parent breeds were favored by the nobility, with the Shih Tzu occupying a special place in the hearts, and palaces, of Chinese emperors, and the Bichon Frise gaining popularity in the European royal courts of the 16th century.The Bichon Shih Tzu, therefore, is a noble companion dog who’s liable to prove as comfortable in a royal palace as he is in an inner-city apartment.

The Zuchon’s Appearance And Attitude to Life

Descended from the Bichon Frise and the Shih Tzu, there’s no way on earth the Zuchon is going to be anything other than a small, cuddly companion.Standing around 9 to 11.5 inches tall and weighing somewhere in the vicinity of nine to 18 pounds, the Zuchon is only a little bigger than your standard teddy bear.There’s a lot of character packed into that compact body, however, making the Zuchon a great companion, family dog, and, would you believe, watchdog!An energetic little dog, the Zuchon enjoys games of fetch and tug-of-war as much as the next dog but will happily adapt to indoor living, turning the living room into a playground and the bedroom into his favorite place to sleep.Although you can be sure any Bichon Shih Tzu cross will be small, that’s about as much guarantee as you’ll get regarding its appearance.As with many designer and crossbreeds, the Zuchon varies widely in appearance, with some sporting curly coats and others the long, flowing locks more commonly associated with the Shih Tzu.This designer dog also sports a wide range of coat colors, although most are white with flashes of a second color, especially around the ears and eyes. Some Bichon Shih Tzu’s have solid coats in various shades of buff, apricot, and cream, while others will display a mix of three different colors.The Shih Tzu parent is the one adding the color variations to the breed!

How To Love and Train a Shichon

Like its Bichon Frise ancestor, the Shichon is a low shedder and produces little dander, making it one of the more hypoallergenic breeds around. Although it doesn’t lose much hair, your Shichon will require daily grooming and, potentially, regular trims.If you suffer from allergies, regular bathing with special shampoos can help keep these under control, although bathing your Shichon more than once a month may dry out their skin, causing discomfort and irritation. Having said that, Shih Tzus, in particular, are prone to being a little smelly, so regular bathing might be the only way to ensure your teddy bear dog remains hug-able.Owners of both the Shih Tzu and the Bichon Frise find their dog’s grooming regime easier to manage if the dog is clipped regularly, and there are some irresistibly cute hairstyles available to these dogs. If you want to accentuate his teddy bear characteristics, a teddy bear trim is ideal, whereas the lion cut is both chic and low-maintenance.As with any dog, the Shichon will require regular dental care and nail trimming to keep him in optimal health.When it comes to training, the early lessons are often the hardest with a Shichon. Like other small dog breeds, the Shichon has a small bladder, making potty training rather challenging. If you’ve had any experience potty training a stubborn puppy, you’ll know how frustrating it can be.Although the Shih Tzu’s stubborn streak is counterbalanced by the Bichon Frise’s willingness to learn, you’ll need to take things slowly. You might want to consider introducing crate training as soon as your Shichon gets home and then use these handy tips and techniques to move onto the next level.Once the initial training phase is complete, positive reinforcement methods can turn your teddy bear dog into a trick-performing superstar. The Shih Tzu’s natural intelligence, combined with the Bichon Frise’s desire to please, make them easy to train. As a result, “they are well-suited for obedience training, learning tricks, and can even shine in agility and obstacle courses.”

Are Zuchons aggressive?

Zuchons are generally friendly dogs, although they can be quick to nip, especially as puppies.According to some, “all teddy bear puppy breeds have the natural instincts to become aggressive,” but there’s little evidence of this in the Zuchon. Nevertheless, correct handling goes a long way to ensuring your Zuchon doesn’t develop any aggressive behavior.These teddy bear puppies are so cute it can be tempting to cuddle and pet them even when they’ve behaved inappropriately. Unfortunately, to your Zuchon, that means you approve of his behavior, which will encourage him to repeat it.To make sure your Bichon Shih Tzu doesn’t develop any aggressive behavior, resist those puppy-dog eyes and ignore him when he behaves badly, only giving him attention as a reward for good behavior.

How much do Shichons cost?

Hybrid breeds are often cheaper than their purebred parent breeds, but that rule doesn’t appear to apply to the Shichon.A Bichon Frise puppy usually costs somewhere between $700 and $2000, whereas a Shih Tzu costs around $1,200 from a registered breeder and up to $3,000 for “dogs with exceptional pedigrees.”Experts suggest you should budget at least $600 for a Shichon puppy, but the ones currently available appear to sell for a minimum of $2,000! You may have to part with as much as $2,950 for a particularly well-bred Bichon Shih Tzu, but that’s a far better option than buying a sub-standard dog from a backyard breeder.Lovable and easy to live with, Zuchons rarely end up in rescue centers but, if you’re lucky, you might find one to adopt just remember that this option isn’t free either, and you’ll probably need to hand over an adoption fee of around $350 to $500.

Do Shih Tzu Bichons Bark A Lot?

Shih Tzu Bichons aren’t excessively noisy dogs, but they will bark to let you know that a stranger has arrived or an intruder’s in the yard. It’s nothing like the Chihuahua, however, or the Pomeranian, both of which have big personalities and loud and insistent voices.

Do Shichons Have a Strong Prey Drive?

The Shichon has virtually no prey drive or hunting instinct. Bred purely as companion dogs, they’re extremely adaptable, happily living with humans of all shapes, sizes, and ages, and mixing well with other pets.Their natural curiosity means they socialize well, although care must be taken when introducing your teddy bear puppy to larger animals that may respond to his enthusiasm with rough play that could cause injury.

Are Bichon Shih Tzus Sociable Dogs?

Bichon Shih Tzus love attention and will greet friends, and even passing strangers will love and enthusiasm. If you’re throwing a dinner party, expect your teddy bear pup to be the star of the show, demanding attention and love from all your guests.