Shih Tzu and Poodle Mix?

This is a question that more than 3922 of our readers have been asking us! Luckily, we have found the most appropriate information for you!

Shihpoo puppies are adorable, and it’s one of the reasons they are so popular. Cute puppies sell, and that makes the Shihpoo a favorite of puppy mills and greedy, irresponsible breeders. But there’s no need to pay big bucks for a Shihpoo. You can often find a wonderful example of this hybrid dog at your local shelter or through adoption organizations.

Crossbreeds such as the Shihpoos here have become popular over the past 10 or 20 years as people seek out dogs that are different from the everyday Yorkie or Poodle or that they think will have certain appealing characteristics. For instance, it’s often claimed (falsely, by the way) that crossbreeds are hypoallergenic or have fewer health problems or will carry the best traits of each breed. Both Shih Tzu and Poodles tend to be friendly and outgoing, but how your puppy turns out depends on the genetic luck of the draw, what he learns from his mother and littermates, and the amount of socialization he gets before and after he goes to his new home. A reputable breeder will be honest and open about health problems in the mixed breed and the incidence with which they occur in her lines. A Shihpoo coat looks its best with professional grooming every four to six weeks, and it requires brushing or combing every couple of days to prevent mats or tangles as well as regular bathing in between appointments with the groomer. In addition, trim his nails every week or two, keep his ears clean and dry, and brush his teeth regularly — daily if you can,with a vet-approved pet toothpaste. If you choose to purchase a Shihpoo, select a breeder who has done the health testing to ensure that her puppies won’t carry the genetic diseases common to Shih Tzu and Poodles . You should also bear in mind that buying a puppy from websites that offer to ship your dog to you immediately can be a risky venture, as it leaves you no recourse if what you get isn’t exactly what you expected. And don’t forget to ask your veterinarian, who can often refer you to a reputable breeder, rescue organization, or other reliable source for healthy puppies. Wherever you acquire your Shihpoo, make sure you have a good contract with the seller, shelter or rescue group that spells out responsibilities on both sides.

What is a Shih Tzu and Poodle mix called?

The Shihpoo is a cross between a Shih Tzu and a Toy or Miniature Poodle.

How much does a Shih Tzu Poodle mix cost?

You should expect to pay anywhere from $500 to $1,000 for a good Shih-Poo puppy, but if the puppy comes from a line of show-dogs, or has a strong pedigree in his lineage, you can pay $2,000 or more. If you are looking for a family pet, pedigree doesn’t matter, but you should ask the breeder about your puppy’s parents.

Is a Shihpoo a good pet?

Simply put, Shih Poos are incredibly cute and incredibly loving, affectionate creatures. For these reasons and more, Shih Poos can make more than just a great pet ; they’re also great as emotional support animals. Ahead, we’ll go through just some of the reasons that can make them so perfect for the job.

Do Shihpoo dogs bark a lot?

Since Shih Poos don’t bark a lot, they make great apartment dogs. Owners of the Shih Poo breed are likely to spend time housetraining. You will need extra effort during housebreaking for this dog. Shih Poo also demands maximum needs when grooming.

The Shih-Poo is a mixed breed dog — a cross between the Shih Tzu and Toy Poodle dog breeds. Small, hypoallergenic and cuddly companions, these pups inherited some of the best qualities from both of their parents.

Low-sensitivity dogs, also called “easygoing,” “tolerant,” “resilient,” and even “thick-skinned,” can better handle a noisy, chaotic household, a louder or more assertive owner, and an inconsistent or variable routine. Do you have young kids, throw lots of dinner parties, play in a garage band, or lead a hectic life? Breed isn’t the only factor that goes into affection levels; dogs who were raised inside a home with people around feel more comfortable with humans and bond more easily. Drool-prone dogs may drape ropes of slobber on your arm and leave big, wet spots on your clothes when they come over to say hello. Mouthy dogs are more likely to use their mouths to hold or “herd” their human family members, and they need training to learn that it’s fine to gnaw on chew toys, but not on people. Mouthy breeds tend to really enjoy a game of fetch, as well as a good chew on a toy that’s been stuffed with kibble and treats. These breeds generally aren’t a good fit for homes with smaller pets that can look like prey, such as cats, hamsters, or small dogs. Nordic dogs such as Siberian Huskies were bred to range long distances, and given the chance, they’ll take off after anything that catches their interest. Originally bred to perform a canine job of some sort, such as retrieving game for hunters or herding livestock, they have the stamina to put in a full workday. They need a significant amount of exercise and mental stimulation, and they’re more likely to spend time jumping, playing, and investigating any new sights and smells. When picking a breed, consider your own activity level and lifestyle, and think about whether you’ll find a frisky, energetic dog invigorating or annoying. These dynamos need lots of training to learn good manners, and may not be the best fit for a home with young kids or someone who’s elderly or frail. Adding Glyde Mobility Chews to your senior’s routine can help fight the symptoms of arthritis and keep your old dog active and playful. That said, for children who learn early how to properly approach and play with a small dog, the Shih-Poo can make a great companion.

The Shih-poo is a cross between a Shih Tzu and a Toy/Miniature Poodle. DogAppy has everything you need to know before you bring home a Shih Tzu-Poodle pup.

The Shih Tzu and Toy Poodle were chosen with the hope of obtaining an offspring which would be hypoallergenic. Depending upon the inherited characteristics, your Shih-poo puppy will have a soft coat of wavy to curly hair. The coat pattern can be solid or variable, with lots of colors, from a dense black to a sandy beige. You need to be watchful when letting the dog play with young children, as it cannot handle misbehavior like rough tugging and hair pulling. But there’s also a distinct possibility that the genetic diversity achieved by mixing two breeds may lower the chances of developing certain inherited diseases. The breed is deemed susceptible to dental problems, hypothyroidism, patellar luxation, renal dysplasia, and lung disorders. You may occasionally spot brownish tear stains below the eyes, which can be cleaned with a soft, wet cloth or a tissue.

Shih-poos are small and fluffy dogs with extra-friendly personalities. One parent breed, the shih tzu, is a loyal and attentive lap dog. The other, a toy poodle, is highly intelligent and loves to be the center of attention. The result is a shih-poo (or “shih poo”), a versatile and spunky pup packed with superb personality traits. Whether he’s a family dog or a companion for seniors, he excels at his role.

intelligenceshedding amountexercise needsenergy levelbarking leveldrool amountbreed groupcoat length/texturecolors brown / chocolate / liver gold / yellow black cream white gray For instance, some shih-poos may appear more poodle-like with a short and curly coat, while others might sport the silky, straight, and luxurious fur that’s synonymous with shih tzus. Niccole Bruno, DVM, chief of staff with Companion Animal Hospital in Spring, Texas, has a shih-poo named Jimmy, a rescue who comes to work with her every day. These dogs are among those that can live happily in an apartment or a smaller home, as long as they get enough activity and interaction from their family. “Plan on being on a regular, consistent 6–8 week schedule with your groomer to avoid uncomfortable matting of their soft coat,” Randall says. As a part of their grooming, Bruno recommends shih-poos get regular “sanitary trims” underneath their tails, on their bellies, and in their armpits. Shih-poo haircuts can also be as diverse as your pup, with some owners preferring to keep their coats long and others opting for a shorter trim. Start at an early age to get your pup accustomed to his dental care routine, and brush his teeth at least a couple of times a week (bonus points if you can do it daily). He’ll love daily walks or trips to the dog park, but if you go on a long hike you’ll probably be carrying him by the end. In general, shih-poos are an easy dog to care for when you take them to the veterinarian regularly, brush their teeth, and stay on top of their grooming appointments, Bruno says. So, regular teeth brushing can help keep your dog’s oral hygiene in good standing, warding off inflamed gums and tartar, Bruno explains. If your shih-poo inherited prominent eyes from a shih tzu parent, he could have some trouble with cataracts , progressive retinal atrophy , and corneal dryness—issues that should be addressed with your vet.

Finding a Shihpoo

Whether you want to go with a breeder or get your dog from a shelter or rescue, here are some things to keep in mind.

Choosing a Shihpoo Breeder

Shihpoo puppies are adorable, and it’s one of the reasons they are so popular. Cute puppies sell, and that makes the Shihpoo a favorite of puppy mills and greedy, irresponsible breeders. But there’s no need to pay big bucks for a Shihpoo. You can often find a wonderful example of this hybrid dog at your local shelter or through adoption organizations.
If you choose to purchase a Shihpoo, select a breeder who has done the health testing to ensure that her puppies won’t carry the genetic diseases common to Shih Tzu and
Poodles. If you are going to pay several hundred dollars or even $1,000 or more for a dog, you should get your money’s worth. Buying from a breeder who is smart and caring enough to do health certifications, even for a crossbreed, is the best way to do that. And while there are no guarantees in life, it’s also a good way to minimize the possibility of big veterinary bills in the future.
Avoid breeders who only seem interested in how quickly they can unload a puppy on you and whether your credit card will go through. You should also bear in mind that buying a puppy from websites that offer to ship your dog to you immediately can be a risky venture, as it leaves you no recourse if what you get isn’t exactly what you expected. Put at least as much effort into researching your puppy as you would into choosing a new car or expensive appliance. It will save you money in the long run.
Lots of reputable breeders have websites, so how can you tell who’s good and who’s not? Red flags include puppies always being available, multiple litters on the premises, having your choice of any puppy, and the ability to pay online with a credit card. Those things are convenient, but they are almost never associated with reputable breeders.
Whether you’re planning to get your new best friend from a breeder, a pet store, or another source, don’t forget that old adage “let the buyer beware”. Disreputable breeders and facilities that deal with puppy mills can be hard to distinguish from reliable operations. There’s no 100% guaranteed way to make sure you’ll never purchase a sick puppy, but researching the crossbreed (so you know what to expect), checking out the facility (to identify unhealthy conditions or sick animals), and asking the right questions can reduce the chances of heading into a disastrous situation. And don’t forget to ask your veterinarian, who can often refer you to a reputable breeder, rescue organization, or other reliable source for healthy puppies.
The cost of a Shihpoo puppy varies depending on the breeder’s locale and whether he has obtained health clearances on the pup’s parents. The puppy you buy should have been raised in a clean home environment, from parents with health clearances.Puppies should be temperament tested, vetted, dewormed, and socialized to give them a healthy, confidentstart in life.
Before you decide to buy a puppy, consider whether an adult Shihpoo might better suit your needs and lifestyle. Puppies are loads of fun, but they require a lot of time and effort before they grow up to become the dog of your dreams. An adult may already have some training and will probably be less active, destructive and demanding than a puppy. With an adult, you know more about what you’re getting in terms of personality and health and you can find adults through breeders or shelters. If you are interested in acquiring an older
dog through breeders, ask them about purchasing a retired show dog or if they know of an adult dog who needs a new home. If you want to adopt a dog, read the advice below on how to do that.

Shih-Poo

The Shih-Poo is a mixed breed dog — a cross between the Shih Tzu and Toy Poodle dog breeds. Small, hypoallergenic and cuddly companions, these pups inherited some of the best qualities from both of their parents.Shih-Poos also go by the names Shoodle or Pooshi, but don’t confuse them with the Poo-Shi, the Poodle/Shiba Inu mix. Despite their status as a designer breed, you may find these mixed breed dogs in shelters and rescues. So remember to adopt! Don’t shop!Shih-Poos make great companion animals for just about anyone, but a retired senior would most likely be an ideal match. They love to be doted on, pampered, and loved. They are pretty versatile and can thrive in almost any environment–family home, apartment, or tiny house in the middle of nowhere.Single person, or family, just make sure your Shih-Poo gets lots of love and attention. Shih-Poos should never be kept outside and will require regular vet check ups, dental cleanings, and grooming. Frequent potty breaks can also help if they inherit their Shih Tzu parents’ propensity for stubbornness and territorial marking.See below for all Shih-Poo facts and mixed dog breed characteristics!

Shih-Poo Mixed Dog Breed Pictures

Vital Stats:

Do not fall for the hypoallergenic promise.

There isn’t a dog that is hypoallergenic, seeing as it is dander which mainly causes allergies. All dogs shed their dead skin cells, which may trigger an allergy. Therefore, do not believe the breeder who tells you that your Shih-poo (or any other breed) is completely hypoallergenic.The Shih Tzu-Poodle mix is a small dog, being a cross between two small-sized breeds. The Shih Tzu and Toy Poodle were chosen with the hope of obtaining an offspring which would be hypoallergenic. Of course, it is now known that all dogs are hypoallergenic to some extent, and can be regarded as allergy triggers.The Shih-poo is very energetic and can be affectionate if socialized and trained well. It is a perfect companion for small families, seniors, and those who dwell in apartments. Those looking for a suitable arm candy can go for this dog, since it is one good looker.
A crossbreed can be easily described as a surprise package―you can never know for sure what you’ll end up with. These pups borrow their physical characteristics and temperament from either parents, and in any proportion. Therefore, it is safe to say that you end up with a very unique pet.

APPEARANCE

Depending upon the inherited characteristics, your Shih-poo puppy will have a soft coat of wavy to curly hair. The coat pattern can be solid or variable, with lots of colors, from a dense black to a sandy beige. Like both parents, this crossbreed is unlikely to shed too much, despite the long coat.The puppy may have a long muzzle like the Poodle, eliminating most breathing problems that come with a short Shih Tzu muzzle. Then again, he may end up with a cute under-bite, a trait consistent with most purebred Shih Tzus.An adult Shih-poo may measure between 8 – 15 inches at the shoulder, and weigh between 8 – 20 lbs. The overall build is sturdy, with an alert and expressive face.

TEMPERAMENT

With a Shih-poo at home, there will never be a dull moment, as it is a tiny firecracker. It will love all its squeaky toys and play fetch for hours on end. It just loves to run and exercise, and will have explored the nooks and corners of your home in no time.You need to be watchful when letting the dog play with young children, as it cannot handle misbehavior like rough tugging and hair pulling. As always, teach your children how to properly behave around dogs, especially small ones.The Shih-poo can be quite a chatty dog, and needs to be specifically trained to keep it down. They may love to bark, and their unending enthusiasm only intensifies it. However, it is your responsibility to train you pup, using force free, positive training.Being the offspring of Poodles, they will inherit their intelligence, along with the loving nature of the Shih Tzu. If properly trained and socialized at a young age, your pup will most likely have a friendly disposition.

HEALTH AND LIFESPAN

Crossbreeds come with their fair share of problems, and do not let any breeder tell you otherwise. Shih-poos could be susceptible to the health problems which ail both, the Shih Tzu and Toy Poodle. But there’s also a distinct possibility that the genetic diversity achieved by mixing two breeds may lower the chances of developing certain inherited diseases. The vagaries of genetic variation makes things quite complicated.Always ask for documented proof of a clean bill of health from your breeder. This includes independent certification that the parents of the dog (and grandparents, etc.) have been screened for genetic defects and deemed healthy for breeding.The breed is deemed susceptible to dental problems, hypothyroidism, patellar luxation, renal dysplasia, and lung disorders. Regular check ups with the vet will always help you keep an update on your pet’s health condition.The lifespan of a Shih-poo can average between 13 – 16 years.

Shih-poo

Shih-poo

Shih-poos are small and fluffy dogs with extra-friendly personalities. One parent breed, the shih tzu, is a loyal and attentive lap dog. The other, a toy poodle, is highly intelligent and loves to be the center of attention. The result is a shih-poo (or “shih poo”), a versatile and spunky pup packed with superb personality traits. Whether he’s a family dog or a companion for seniors, he excels at his role.While shih tzus and toy poodles are both popular dog breeds with ancient and regal history, shih-poos are a relatively new breed. They’ve only been around for a few decades but are beginning to make a name for themselves. Full-grown shih-poos can be teeny-tiny (as small as 7 pounds), or weigh up to 20 pounds. They can come with curly coats like their poodle parent or a more straight coat inherited from their shih tzu side of the family.”Shih-poos are lively, active, and animated dogs with a sense of humor,” says Liz Randall, CPDT-KA, owner and CEO of Dogs Abound. “They are intelligent and playful and are great companions for an active home that will include their dog at the center of much of their activities.”Shih-poos are adaptable to small living spaces (they’re A-OK with apartment living) and, because they shed so little, they tend to be allergy-friendly dogs and are generally considered hypoallergenic. Shih-poo dogs do require a good deal of grooming, so make sure you have the time (and budget) for their beauty routines.

Appearance

Because shih-poos are a cross breed, there’s no breed standard that spells out what shih-poosShih-poo puppies, even from the same litter, may look completely different. With hybrid dogs such as these teddy bear shih-poos, it all comes down to which parent’s traits dominate. For instance, some shih-poos may appear more poodle-like with a short and curly coat, while others might sport the silky, straight, and luxurious fur that’s synonymous with shih tzus. Still, other shih-poos may don a coat that’s quasi-curly and semi-silky.The color of their coats can be a bit of a wild card, too. Some common colors are white, black, brown, brindle, gray, red, or apricot—and that’s not even including all the possible color combinations.

Temperament

Niccole Bruno, DVM, chief of staff with Companion Animal Hospital in Spring, Texas, has a shih-poo named Jimmy, a rescue who comes to work with her every day. (Shih-poos absolutely love to be your shadow!) While dogs can have their own personalities, generally speaking, shih-poos tend to be friendly, well-tempered dogs.”Jimmy would probably greet a robber,” Bruno says. His motto is: “If you give me some attention, I’m going to love you.”Shih-poos, in general, are versatile dogs and tend to be ideal for families, seniors, couples, or retirees, says Jen Jones, a professional dog trainer and behavior specialist who runs Your Dog Advisor.”They are bred companion dogs that are mild-mannered, friendly, and sweet-natured,” Jones says. She says these dogs will be happiest in homes with owners who are home often and spend a good deal of time with them.Shih-poos are moderate- to high-energy pets, and they are above average in the intelligence department. Though they’re affectionate, they’re not exactly couch potatoes, Randall says. In short: These pups love to play.”They will keep you laughing and want to be involved in all the daily goings on,” Randall says.

Living Needs

Shih-poos tend to be diplomatic dogs. While every dog has an individual personality, these pups generally get along well with other household pets, including cats and other dogs. And while these family-friendly pets tend to be great with kids, you’ll want to teach your children to be gentle around these pint-sized puppers. Shih-poos are also excellent companions for seniors.These dogs are among those that can live happily in an apartment or a smaller home, as long as they get enough activity and interaction from their family. Though their little legs might not be conducive for hiking up a mountain, they’re still spunky and playful. After they tire out, shih-poos will enjoy cuddling up on your lap for the rest of the evening.This hybrid breed loves to be a constant companion and shouldn’t be left alone for long periods of time. He’ll do best with an owner who’s a homebody or who will take him along on errands and adventures.

Care

Shih-poos are more adorable than athletic. While they aren’t exactly running partners, they do enjoy daily walkies and playfully romping around in the yard or park.Randall says shih-poo owners should plan on regular training sessions and daily exercise with their dogs. Like all breeds, shih-poos respond best to positive reinforcement training and receiving treats as rewards.”They love human interaction and training, so keeping their brains busy and engaged is important,” Randall says.As with any poodle or poodle mix, Randall says, regular grooming is a necessity.”Plan on being on a regular, consistent 6–8 week schedule with your groomer to avoid uncomfortable matting of their soft coat,” Randall says. Regular brushing, preferably on a daily basis, is a must in-between grooming appointments.As a part of their grooming, Bruno recommends shih-poos get regular “sanitary trims” underneath their tails, on their bellies, and in their armpits. Shih-poo haircuts can also be as diverse as your pup, with some owners preferring to keep their coats long and others opting for a shorter trim.In addition to regular brushing his coat, Bruno recommends brushing your shih-poo’s teeth regularly. Start at an early age to get your pup accustomed to his dental care routine, and brush his teeth at least a couple of times a week (bonus points if you can do it daily).

Health

A shih-poo lifespan is lengthy—these small dogs can live 15 years or more.In general, shih-poos are an easy dog to care for when you take them to the veterinarian regularly, brush their teeth, and stay on top of their grooming appointments, Bruno says. They aren’t particularly subject to major illnesses or health conditions, but, like all small dogs, shih-poos can be prone to dental disease. So, regular teeth brushing can help keep your dog’s oral hygiene in good standing, warding off inflamed gums and tartar, Bruno explains. Dental chews can help, too.Shih-poos may also be prone to some orthopedic diseases that affect their bones, joints, or muscles. Some examples could be hip dysplasia, which occurs when the hip joint doesn’t develop like it should. When this happens, dogs may limp after exercise or have difficulty jumping or climbing. Patellar luxation, or dislocated kneecap, can be another problem.If your shih-poo inherited prominent eyes from a shih tzu parent, he could have some trouble with cataracts, progressive retinal atrophy, and corneal dryness—issues that should be addressed with your vet.

History

This hybrid breed probably emerged within the last 30 years when shih tzus were bred with toy poodles. While shih-poos are a relatively new breed, both of his cosmopolitan parents have well-established histories.The shih tzu breed dates back at least 1,000 years, when they were kept in monasteries throughout Tibet. Some legends say these companion dogs were trained to turn the prayer wheels, according to the Shih Tzu Club, and fantastical illustrations depicted these dogs as little lions. Folklore says Buddha traveled with a little dog believed to be a shih tzu. The American Kennel Club recognized the shih tzu in 1969.The “poo” in shih-poo comes from the poodle, the national dog of France. Despite the affinity for poodles in France, these dogs were developed and bred as duck hunters in Germany. In French, the poodle is known as the

Beverly Shaffer
Recycling old ones doesn't make them good, or original... AC... and everyone else posting unoriginal stuff. Now run along, before I get deleted for this one, while your recycled crap stays. Cheers :) People need dreams Problem solver. Pop culture fanatic. Twitter fanatic. Proud creator. Zombie mom. Interests: Dancing, Calligraphy
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