Rat Terrier Life Span?

First gaining popularity in the United States as a hunting dog and loyal companion to President Theodore Roosevelt, the Rat Terrier is an American dog breed created when European immigrants crossed terriers they brought over. This dog breed is known for its intelligence and loving personality and makes a great family pet.

The short, dense coat may be solid white, bi-colored or tri-colored in black, tan, chocolate, apricot, blue, or lemon. The Rat Terrier requires a good amount of daily outdoor exercise such as a long walk or jog.

What health problems do rat terriers have?

This breed is mainly healthy, living an average life span of 15 to 18 years. Some health problems that may occur with a Rat Terrier are hip and elbow dysplasia, and patellar luxation.

How long do rat terriers live?

Pomeranians and rat terriers both made the list of longest-living purebreds, so it shouldn’t be a surprise that the Pomeranian and rat terrier mix, a Pomerat, can live between 15 to 18 years.

Are rat terriers good pets?

The Rat Terrier is probably one of the best family pets. With their easy-going dispositions, Rat Terriers make great pets for families with children. They’re also good pets for senior citizens.

What terrier lives the longest?

The smaller breeds of dogs tend to live the longest. Yorkshire terriers, Chihuahuas, Dachshunds, Toy Poodles and Lhasa Apsos are the breeds who typically live the longest with these averaging a lifespan of up to 20 years. This is much higher than the average lifespan of a dog which is between 10 and 13 years.

An American original with a breed name said to be coined by Teddy Roosevelt, the Rat Terrier is a compact, tough, smooth-coated exterminator dog. The breed comes in two size varieties and are happy-go-lucky, playful, and portable companions.

Members of the Rat Terrier dog breed are adorable, little, digging escape artists who are true terriers: feisty, funny, energetic, lively, vermin-chasing, and incapable of being boring. Stubborn as all get out, they are not big on pleasing people, but the people who love them laugh all the time.

Breed isn’t the only factor that goes into affection levels; dogs who were raised inside a home with people around feel more comfortable with humans and bond more easily. Mouthy dogs are more likely to use their mouths to hold or “herd” their human family members, and they need training to learn that it’s fine to gnaw on chew toys, but not on people.

These breeds generally aren’t a good fit for homes with smaller pets that can look like prey, such as cats, hamsters, or small dogs. Originally bred to perform a canine job of some sort, such as retrieving game for hunters or herding livestock, they have the stamina to put in a full workday. They need a significant amount of exercise and mental stimulation, and they’re more likely to spend time jumping, playing, and investigating any new sights and smells.

When picking a breed, consider your own activity level and lifestyle, and think about whether you’ll find a frisky, energetic dog invigorating or annoying. These dynamos need lots of training to learn good manners, and may not be the best fit for a home with young kids or someone who’s elderly or frail. Look for a reputable breeder who tests her breeding dogs to make sure they’re free of genetic diseases that they might pass onto the puppies, and that they have sound temperaments.

Being a farm dog and hunter, the need for the Rat Terrier to catch prey and pests drove breeders to start adding new strains to the breed in the 1910s and 1920s. In the Midwest, the Rat Terrier was bred to Whippets and Italian Greyhounds to produce a more versatile and quick-footed dog who could help control the jackrabbit problem. The Rat Terrier was a common sight on farms between the 1910s and 1940s but eventually started to decline after farmers began using poison to control rodent populations.

He succeeded in producing a large Rat Terrier with a fixed ear set a hunting dog who would even retrieve from water. Bred to work all day on the farm, these guys need a lot of exercise and if they don’t get it, their sharp little minds can turn devious to amuse themselves. Inviting visitors over regularly, and taking him to busy parks, stores that allow dogs, and on leisurely strolls to meet neighbors will also help him polish his social skills.

Demodectic Mange: Sometimes called demodicosis, this condition is caused by the demodex mite, which a mother dog passes to her pups in their first few days of life. Demodex mites live in hair follicles and usually don’t cause problems, but if your Rat Terrier has a weakened or compromised immune system, he can develop demodectic mange. It often clears up on its own, but even so, you should take your dog to the vet to prevent it from turning into the generalized form of demodectic mange, which covers the entire body and causes infection.

Make grooming a positive experience filled with praise and rewards, and you’ll lay the groundwork for easy veterinary exams and other handling when he’s an adult.

Physical Characteristics

A small dog breed, the Rat Terrier weighs around 12 to 35 pounds at a height of 14 to 23 inches and is very muscular for its size. Ears can be erect or button and tails can be at an upward curve or a natural bob. The short, dense coat may be solid white, bi-colored or tri-colored in black, tan, chocolate, apricot, blue, or lemon.

Personality and Temperament

The Rat Terrier is an ideal dog breed for a family looking for an energetic pet. This breed does well with children and is very loyal to its family. Similar to other terrier breeds, the Rat Terrier is a curious and intelligent dog that is very playful and loving.

Care

The Rat Terrier requires a good amount of daily outdoor exercise such as a long walk or jog. It will do fine as an apartment dog so long as it is provided with an adequate amount of exercise. The Rat Terrier sheds lightly and requires occasional brushing.

Health

This breed is mainly healthy, living an average life span of 15 to 18 years. Some health problems that may occur with a Rat Terrier are hip and elbow dysplasia, and patellar luxation.

Rat Terrier

Members of the Rat Terrier dog breed are adorable, little, digging escape artists who are true terriers: feisty, funny, energetic, lively, vermin-chasing, and incapable of being boring. Stubborn as all get out, they are not big on pleasing people, but the people who love them laugh all the time.Even though these are purebred dogs, you may find them in the care of shelters or rescue groups. Remember to adopt! Don’t shop if you want to bring a dog home.The Rat Terrier is the ideal farm dog that they were always intended to be. President Theodore Roosevelt is said to have given the breed its name after his own terrier had eradicated the rat infestation at the White House; clearly, the Rat Terrier excels as a public servant — as long as it’s in their own best interest. They’re an American tradition just like apple pie, but watch your plate, or you may find you’re missing dessert.See below for complete dog breed traits and facts about Rat Terriers!