Poisonous Spiders in Tennessee?

Identifying spiders correctly is vital to prevent potentially dangerous bites. Most spiders will do just fine with being moved outdoors via your bare hands. Others might send you to the emergency room.

: No Adult size: 312 mm Diet: Woodlice, mice, millipedes, and centipedes Species: Latrodectus variolus Longevity: 13 years (females) Good to own as a pet?

The northern black widow is slightly different from their southern cousin. Their hourglass mark is a bit broken and doesnt look quite as clear as the southern black widows. Species: Steatoda grossa Longevity: 13 years Good to own as a pet?

: Yes Adult size: 1015 mm Diet: Insectsmostly flying varieties Image Credit: Pong Wira, Shutterstock Species: Loxosceles reculsa Longevity: 12 years Good to own as a pet? They have a lighter brown, violin-shaped marking on their back, which is the primary way that they are identified.

Symptoms range from mild to severewith most not being much more severe than a bee sting. Species: Cheiracanthium mildei Longevity: 12 years Good to own as a pet? : No Adult size: 599 mm Diet: Insects and other spiders

Technically, the northern yellow sac spider is venomous. Species: Araneus bicentenarius Longevity: 12 years Good to own as a pet? : Yes Adult size: 1030 mm Diet: Insects and wasps

Species: Gasteracantha cancriformis Longevity: 1 year (max) Good to own as a pet? : Yes Adult size: 99120 mm Diet: Winged insects Species: Phidippus audax Longevity: 12 years Good to own as a pet?

Species: Phidippus otiosus Longevity: 1012 months Good to own as a pet? As their name suggests, the Canopy Jumping Spider spends most of their life in trees. Species: Phidippus otiosus Longevity: 1012 months Good to own as a pet?

: Yes Adult size: 58 mm Diet: Aphids, mites, ants They have black spots across their abdomen and a patch of pale scales on their head. They have relatively large legs in comparison to other jumping spiders .

They live most of their life on magnolia trees, which their translucent green body helps them blend into. Species: Dolomedes tenebrosus Longevity: 1012 months Good to own as a pet? : No (semi-aquatic nature makes care difficult) Legal to own?

: Yes Adult size: 1520 mm Diet: Aquatic insects and small fish This species can stay underwater for several minutes, grabbing onto a plant to keep themselves under. Species: Steatoda triangulosa Longevity: 1012 months Good to own as a pet?

: Yes Adult size: 36 mm Diet: Ticks, arthropods, and other spiders Purple zigzag lines down their abdomen make them relatively easy to identify. However, their venom is not toxic to people and does not require medical intervention.

Species: Parasteatoda tepidariorum Longevity: 1012 months Good to own as a pet? : Yes Adult size: 38 mm Diet: Mosquitoes, flies, wasps, ants, etc. They are a dull brown with either yellow or orange legs, which are rather long and skinny.

Symptoms of bites include swelling, itching, and redness. Species: Anahita punctulata Longevity: 1012 months Good to own as a pet? They have decently long legs, especially compared to other wandering spiders.

However, their bite doesnt cause anything worse than localized pain and swelling. Species: Cyclocosmia truncata Longevity: 512 years Good to own as a pet? : Yes Adult size: 1930 mm Diet: Beetles, grasshoppers, moths, and crickets

They rarely bite people and dont have enough venom to cause medical problems. Usually, these spiders hide or cover up their burrow when threatened, reducing the odds of actually biting a person. Species: Tigrosa georgicola Longevity: 17 years Good to own as a pet?

The brown recluses marking gets thicker around their head, making it look more like a violin. Species: Misumenoides formosipes Longevity: 10-12 months Good to own as a pet? : Yes Adult size: 2.5-11.3 mm Diet: Mites, butterflies, and honeybees

Females range from tan to white to yellow, while males are shiny red or green. They do technically have venom, but it is only strong enough to harm prey animals smaller than the spider. It is entirely harmless to people because the spider is unable to inject it into human skin.

Correct identification can be significant because many of these species have potentially harmful venom. Even the venomous spiders in Tennessee arent extremely harmful most of their bites are minor and require no medical attention. These spiders simply dont make enough venom for most healthy adults to be threatened.

That said, spider bites are most harmful to children due to their smaller size, seniors, and those with compromised immune systems. She currently resides in Tennessee with four dogs, three cats, two fish, and a lizard, though she has dreams of owning chickens one-day!

How many venomous spiders are in Tennessee?

Luckily, there are ONLY four types of poisonous spiders in Tennessee! And fortunately, they only bite when disturbed or provoked. It’s important to remember that spiders would rather run away from you than bite. If you come across one of the spiders listed below, please DO NOT DISTURB!

Does Tennessee have brown recluse?

Brown recluse spiders are medium-sized and range in length from ¼ to ¾ of an inch. Their most distinguishing mark is a violin-shaped mark on the top of the body; they also have three pairs of eyes that are arranged in a unique semi-circle pattern. These spiders are venomous and are found in every county in Tennessee.

What bugs are poisonous in Tennessee?

Black Widow Spiders. Two of the five species of widows in the United States, the northern and southern black widow, live in Tennessee. ….The Brown Recluse. The brown recluse is the only other poisonous spider found in Tennessee. ….Ticks. ….Mosquitoes. ….Other Insects.

Many of us fear spiders. Maybe not the burn the house down theres a spider in it kind of fear, but there’s still a fear. Many of us know the truth about these spiders and whether they are dangerous or not, but were still not a huge fan of sharing our space with them. Here in Tennessee, we have a few spiders to be concerned about, and then we have the common ones that are not a concern but are more of a nuisance. We have heard your questions such as, are black widow spiders dangerous to humans? Many of you also ask, will a black widow bite kill you? Let’s take a closer look.

Daddy Long Legs, are the type of spider that we all find in the dark and damp areas of buildings. Their bite may sting a bit and may swell and turn red, but it is extremely rare for a person to have an allergic or more severe reaction to it.

While Tennessee isn’t quite the Australian outback, it still has its share of dangerous creatures. Most of the spiders in the southern state aren’t poisonous, but two can pose certain dangers for some people. A handful of other insects found in the state also pose certain risks and should be avoided.

While not commonly deadly, the bite of a black widow may cause severe illness and pain. They prefer to hide in places where they can live without being bothered, such as books, boxes and attics.

Mosquitoes can, however, transmit serious diseases by being infected with viruses that they give to humans when they bite them. According to the Government of Tennessee‘s bulletin on venomous animals, the Saddleback, Puss Moth and Io Moth caterpillars all produce bites that are painful, itchy and leave prolonged infected lesions. The bites cause prolonged pain and slight sickness rather than serious or long lasting effects.

Southern Black Widow

Most people know about the black widow spider. While there are technically several species, the southern black widow is the most well-known one.Females have the familiar red hourglass on their backs. Males are either purple or greyish black. They tend to become more purple as they get older.These spiders are highly venomous. A few hundred bites are recorded each year, but there are usually no adult fatalities. Females are more venomous because they are larger and have sharper mouthparts.

Northern Black Widow

The northern black widow is slightly different from their southern cousin. Their hourglass mark is a bit broken and doesn’t look quite as clear as the southern black widow’s. However, the red markings are still quite noticeable.These spiders are shy, so bites are not expected. Usually, they flee instead of bite.While their venom is toxic, it is released in small amounts. There are few fatalities, with most of them being children.

False Black Widow

While these spiders look like black widows, their bite is harmless. These spiders have white, beige, or orange markings on their abdomens instead of the red markings commonly associated with black widows.They do look similar to a regular black widow, which is why they often get mistaken as such.These spiders do have venom, but it is not particularly troublesome for people. Mild pain is usually the only symptom.

Brown Recluse

These spiders are primarily brown. They have a lighter brown, violin-shaped marking on their back, which is the primary way that they are identified.The brown recluse is quite venomous. They have a hemotoxic venom that requires medical attention. Symptoms range from mild to severe–with most not being much more severe than a bee sting.This species is not aggressive, though. They usually only bite after being disturbed or threatened.

Northern Yellow Sac

Technically, the northern yellow sac spider is venomous. However, the severity of their venom appears to be relatively low. They don’t cause intense reactions in most cases.Their ashen body and yellow-beige abdomen characterize these spiders. Usually, they have patches of green as well.They are less common than other variants and are usually not listed on venomous spider lists.

Giant Lichen Orb Weaver

These spiders are enormous. Their large size is why they got their name.They make orb-shaped spiral webs up to 8 feet in diameter. These spiders sit on the edge of their web and wait for their prey, unlike other spiders.They do hunt with venom, but it is not dangerous to humans. They are relatively docile and bite infrequently.

Spiny-Backed Orb Weaver

This spider looks quite odd. The females have six abdominal projections, though the males only have four or five.Many people mistake them as harmful due to their “spiky” appearance. However, they are entirely harmless.They rarely bite and aren’t venomous. Like many spiders, they use venom to kill their prey, but this venom is not harmful to people.

Bold Jumping

Jumping spiders are among the most common species in Tennessee. They have an exquisite coloration, which also makes them among the more beautiful species out there.They hunt by pouncing on their prey and may do this when frightened as well. They don’t make webs for prey purposes.They don’t like people and are not venomous in the least. Their bite may be a bit painful and swollen, though.

Canopy Jumping Spider

As their name suggests, the Canopy Jumping Spider spends most of their life in trees. They range in color from brown to orange to grey. They are known for their scary-looking purple-green fangs, though their bite is quite harmless.This species does not make a web for prey. Instead, they are hunting spiders. However, they may make webs while resting.

Magnolia Green Jumper

The Magnolia Green Jumper is green, as their name says. They have black spots across their abdomen and a patch of pale scales on their head.They have relatively large legs in comparison to other jumping spiders. Their vision is also better than most other spiders.They live most of their life on magnolia trees, which their translucent green body helps them blend into.

Dock Spider

The Dock Spider is one of the few aquatic spider species native to Tennessee. They are found throughout much of the U.S.A., southern Canada, and Mexico.This species can stay underwater for several minutes, grabbing onto a plant to keep themselves under. They mostly do this when threatened.

Triangulate Cobweb

This species has a brown or black body with yellow-tan legs. Purple zigzag lines down their abdomen make them relatively easy to identify. They also have triangular yellow spots on their abdomen.Their abdomen is also strangely round-shaped. The males tend to be more slender than the females.This species is not known for being aggressive. They may bite if provoked. However, their venom is not toxic to people and does not require medical intervention.

American House Spider

Also known as the common house spider, this species is well-known throughout much of the United States. They are a dull brown with either yellow or orange legs, which are rather long and skinny.These spiders are known for biting, though they aren’t necessarily aggressive. They are not venomous to people, though they are closely related to the black widow. Usually, they only bite when provoked.Symptoms of bites include swelling, itching, and redness. Bites usually look like your typical bug bite, so it can be hard to tell the difference.

Southeastern Wandering Spider

The southeastern wandering spider is a dull brown or tan. They have decently long legs, especially compared to other wandering spiders.These spiders do not spin webs to catch their prey. Instead, they stay hidden inside a “den” and attack when something gets close enough. While these dens are usually in the ground, they can also be in plants and fruits, like bananas.They will get defensive if provoked. However, their bite doesn’t cause anything worse than localized pain and swelling. It will look similar to other bug bites.Their venom is simply not strong enough to harm people.

Ravine Trapdoor

This interesting-looking spider has a rather plump body and thick legs. They have a disc-like abdomen that helps them clog their burrow’s entrance when necessary.They rarely bite people and don’t have enough venom to cause medical problems. Their bites will resemble the bites of other moderately venomous bugs. Localized swelling and redness may occur.Usually, these spiders hide or cover up their burrow when threatened, reducing the odds of actually biting a person. They aren’t known for traveling into human dwellings either.

Wolf Spiders

There are several types of wolf spiders. One of the most common is the Tigrosa georgicola, which is endemic to the southeastern U.S.A.These spiders are primarily dark brown, though they have a lighter brown stripe that runs down their carapace. They are commonly mistaken for brown recluses due to this marking.However, their light stripe is more obviously a stripe. The brown recluse’s marking gets thicker around their head, making it look more like a violin.All wolf spiders will chase and pounce on their prey, just like a real wolf does. They do not build webs for hunting purposes.

Black Widow Spiders

Two of the five species of widows in the United States, the northern and southern black widow, live in Tennessee. The spiders are more common in more southern states like Tennessee due to its warmer climate. Widows have a distinctive red hourglass marking on the abdomen. They hide in dank places like root cellars and under piles of firewood. While not commonly deadly, the bite of a black widow may cause severe illness and pain.

The Brown Recluse

The brown recluse is the only other poisonous spider found in Tennessee. Of all the spider bites in Tennessee, it is estimated that as many as 15 to 25 percent are done by the brown recluse. A brown recluse’s bite is not deadly. However, its bite can cause sickness and leave a wound that may ulcerate. As the name implies, recluse spiders are not likely to seek out people to bite. They prefer to hide in places where they can live without being bothered, such as books, boxes and attics.

Ticks

Wood ticks are quite common in the state and actively feed on people. The number of reported cases of tick-related diseases doubled in Tennessee between 2005 and 2010. A tick bite can lead to diseases like Rocky Mountain spotted fever or Lyme disease.

Mosquitoes

Mosquitoes are virtually everywhere in the United States, and the Volunteer State is no exception. Most mosquito bites are itchy or slightly painful, as is the ensuing inflammation in some people, but the bites are generally harmless.Mosquitoes can, however, transmit serious diseases by being infected with viruses that they give to humans when they bite them. West Nile virus is a factor in Tennessee, in 2017, there were 30 human West Nile cases, as well as 17 cases of La Crosse virus, among Tennessee residents.