Poisonous Spiders in Oregon?

What is lurking in your dreams, Oregonians? If it’s creepy-crawly spiders, you don’t really have much to fear. Yes, Oregon is full of them, but with a few exceptions, none pose a threat to humans. But knowing how to identify what you see just might come in handy, if you are the unlucky recipient of a rare spider bite. (Photo of running crab spider courtesy of Robert Niese/NorthwestNaturalist.tumblr.com)

The running crab spider (Philodromus dispar) does not build a web, but instead ambushes insect prey. During the day, they sleep in a silk sac they have spun, typically attached in the corner of a wall and the ceiling.

Spiders may freak you out, but Susan Masta , associate professor at Portland State University’s Department of Biology, notes that they are unlikely to bite humans (their mouthparts are designed to feed on small things, like insects, not huge-to-a-spider things like a person.) In Europe, where they originate, the hobo spider and all other related species are considered harmless.. (Courtesy of Robert Niese/NorthwestNaturalist.tumblr.com) Found mostly east of the Cascades, the black widow instills fear thanks to its distinctive coloring, red hourglass and ominous-sounding name.

And not to keep you up at night, but there are official accounts of black widows appearing in the western part of the state. But, officially, the brown recluse spider, with a venom that can cause skin lesions in humans, is not present in Oregon, scientists say . This one is a jumping spider, but if you aren’t sure what that creepy crawly thing in your yard or garden is , there are resources to help.

Are there any poisonous spiders in Oregon?

While technically almost all spider species in the world are considered venomous (not poisonous), there is only one single spider species in Oregon that is considered medically significant: the western black widow (Latrodectus hesperus). The red hourglass-shape on the bottom of a western black widow.

Are there poisonous spiders in Portland OR?

Hobo Spider : The Most Dangerous Spider In Portland. Portland is notorious for its clouds, rain, hipster smash, and food carts; however, a lesser known truth is that Portland has Tegenaria Agrestis, aka HOBO SPIDERS. Flesh-rotting, poisonous Hobo Spiders. On your bed.

Do the giant house spiders live in Oregon?

Hobo (Tegenaria agrestis) & giant house spiders (T. gigantea). They can be found wherever people live in Oregon.

Are there Funnel spiders in Oregon?

Three species of Tegenaria funnel web spiders may be encountered around Portland-area residences. These are the barn funnel weaver (Tegenaria domestica), the giant house spider (Tegenaria gigantia), and the hobo spider (Tegenaria agrestis).

And fortunately, they only bite when disturbed or provoked. Its important to remember that spiders would rather run away from you than bite. If you come across one of the spiders listed below, please DO NOT DISTURB!

Even though they have highly toxic venom, 15 times stronger than a rattlesnake, they are not aggressive insects. But, if you are one of the few unlucky people who are bitten each year, you should know that the venom affects your nervous system.

If you are bitten, the bite requires medical attention, and the neurotoxic venom can be fatal to small children if untreated. The best places to look for them include overhanging ledges, under benches or stones, near entrances to abandoned rodent burrows, or around outbuildings. Light brown or tan in color with two darker bands extending back.

Correctly identifying this venomous spider is difficult because individuals vary greatly in appearance. It is also referred to as the aggressive house spider, but this name is misleading as it does not naturally live indoors. But they are also found in many other places close to the ground with holes and cracks, such as rock retaining walls, construction supplies, beneath the debris, and building foundations.

Pale yellow-beige color with dark brown markings on its palps, jaws, and on the ends of its feet. The severity of a Yellow Sac bite is not nearly as bad as a Black Widow or Brown Recluse. A study of twenty confirmed Yellow Sac Spider bites found that none resulted in necrosis (decaying of tissue due to cells dying).

Honestly, its pretty uncommon to actually see a Yellow Sac Spider unless youre actively searching for one. Lastly, in 2011, Black-footed Yellow Sac Spiders caused quite a big problem for Mazda.

Even just the sight or the thought of a spider triggers panic and nightmares for many people. Even though almost all spiders around the world are absolutely harmless. And that is even more true for spiders in Oregon. There are almost 1,000 different spider species found in the Pacific Northwest. This page provides and overview of the most common spiders in Oregon, gives you identification tips and helps you identify potentially dangerous spiders in Oregon.

While being very rare in the Northwest, black widows are sometimes also seen in the Portland area, more often in the Willamette Valley. This spider has a similar shape and overall appearance but doesnt have any red markings on its body.

Potentially dangerous spiders have fascinated people and news outlets ever since they appeared. While very few sightings have been confirmed, those are individual cases or recluses having been imported on cargo or cars into the state. The brown recluse, loxosceles reclusa, is one of the more dangerous spiders indigenous in the United States.

This page gives an overview of how to identify a brown recluse and in which states in the US it appears. While this was popular belief up to around 30 years ago, it is now proven that hobo spiders do not pose a threat for humans or larger pets. Spiders are well aware that their tiny teeth (fangs) will not protect them from something like an approaching human.

Adult females can reach a total leg span of up to 3 inches (75 mm). The red-backed jumping spider, Phidippus johnsoni, is found throughout the Western United States and Canada. Especially in autumn, the gardens fill up with green, yellow, white and red spiders in Oregon.

The missing sector orb weaver, Zygiella x-notata, is a common spider species found throughout Europe and the United States. Even though Xysticus funestus has a dangerously-sounding common name, the deadly ground crab spider, it is of absolutely no concern … Read More Araneus trifolium, the shamrock spider, is a widely distributed orb weaver that can come in various colors, mostly beige or … Read More

Larinioides Cornutus, commonly known as the furrow spider, is an orb weaver species that can be found throughout the Northern … Read More The Araneus Gemmoides is an orb weaver species that occurs in the Western United States.

Poisonous Spiders in Oregon

While technically almost all spider species in the world are considered venomous (not poisonous), there is only one single spider species in Oregon that is considered medically significant:The western black widow is a medium-sized spider with a large and round abdomen. The spider is almost completely black and shiny with a red-hourglass shape on the bottom of its abdomen. Some male and juvenile spiders also have red or white markings on their backs.In Oregon, the black widow is rarely found in Portland and Northwestern Oregon. While black widows are generally a rare sight in Oregon, the majority of their population is found in Eastern Oregon, east of the Cascades Mountain Range and in Southwestern Oregon around Medford. While being very rare in the Northwest, black widows are sometimes also seen in the Portland area, more often in the Willamette Valley.Many alleged sightings of black widows are actually similar-looking false black widows (Steatoda grossa). This spider has a similar shape and overall appearance but doesn’t have any red markings on its body. Sometimes, their overall body color appears brown-black or purple-black while the black widow’s primary color is dark black. Click below to learn more about the western black widow:

What about the brown recluse in Oregon?

Potentially dangerous spiders have fascinated people and news outlets ever since they appeared. Most of us have heard or read stories of someone who allegedly saw a brown recluse in Oregon. And that is true for any U.S. State, regardless of how far out of the natural range that may be.The truth is that the range of the infamous brown recluse is nowhere near the borders or Oregon. Recluse spiders prefer warm and arid habitats and the Chilean recluse spider can be found as far up north as San Francisco. And that is still a long way to Oregon.So our answer is: No, you don’t need to worry about brown recluse spiders in Oregon. While very few sightings have been confirmed, those are individual cases or recluses having been imported on cargo or cars into the state. However, due to the climate conditions, they have failed (and will, for the foreseeable future) to establish a population.

What about the hobo spider?

Another myth about poisonous spiders in Oregon is the fact that the hobo spider (Eratigena agrestis) is deadly and aggressive. While this was popular belief up to around 30 years ago, it is now proven that hobo spiders do not pose a threat for humans or larger pets. At least no more than other harmless spiders. A bite might still cause some swellings and may be uncomfortable but it is unlikely to cause any serious harm.While the hobo spider is very common around and in Oregon homes, there is also no evidence that it is any more aggressive than any other spider. Spiders are well aware that their tiny teeth (fangs) will not protect them from something like an approaching human. Therefore, they rather escape when we approach than attack. And that is true for the hobo spider as well.You can read more about the hobo spider here:

Common house spiders in Oregon

The giant house spider (Eratigena atrica) is the largest spider in Oregon. Adult females can reach a total leg span of up to 3 inches (75 mm). The giant house spider is the most common spider in and around homes in the Pacific Northwest. It is a close relative and look-alike of the hobo spider and therefore often mis-identified. The giant house spider is a large brown spider and often also confused with the common wolf spider in Oregon.While the giant house spider, the wolf spider and the hobo spider are the largest spiders often found inside homes, most house spiders in Oregon are smaller and often live among us without us noticing them. Some spiders commonly found inside in Oregon are the gray house spider (Badumna longinqua), an invasive species imported from Australia (harmless, though), false widow spiders (Steatoda), the common house spider (Parasteatoda tepidariorum) as well as jumping spiders. You can scroll through the list below and click on any image or heading to learn more about each spider. Below you can find more images and information about Oregon spiders.

Jumping spiders

Jumping spiders are small to medium-sized spiders with the ability to jump. They are part of the spider family of Salticidae. There are almost 400 species of jumping spiders in the United States and many of them can also be found in Oregon. Jumping spiders are characterized by their large eyes and are spiders with excellent vision. They are able to clearly focus on nearby objects so that they can perfectly calculate their jumps. The most common jumping spiders in Oregon are the zebra jumping spider, the daring jumping spider and the red-backed jumping spider.

Other common spiders in Oregon

Large spiders found in Oregon are huntsman spiders, mouse spiders, which are found in eastern, central and southern Oregon as well as fishing spiders (Dolomedes sp.). Check out the images here to identify your spider and click to learn more: