Poisonous Spiders in Minnesota?

The U.S. is the natural home of three types of venomous spiders: widows, recluses and hobos. Hobos are the least widespread, found primarily in the Pacific Northwest. Numerous types of recluses, including the most famous, the brown recluse, roam around many parts of the country. Also widespread in America are five types of widow spiders, including three varieties of black widow. Of all these, only one is indigenous to Minnesota: the Northern black widow.

Like all spiders, Northern black widows have a cephalothorax with the head and eight legs, and an abdomen bearing web spinnerets. Across Minnesota, these widows are drawn to making their homes in bushes, brush or woodpiles, hollowed-out logs, fences, sheds, garages, crawlspaces, abandoned animal burrows and similar out-of-the-way, sheltered places.

Are there any poisonous spiders in Minnesota?

The Northern black widow is the only venomous spider with populations occurring naturally in the U.S. state of Minnesota. Fifteen other states have just one indigenous poisonous spider, and it just so happens that the Northern black widow is also the single resident in 11 of these 15 states.

How many poisonous spiders live in Minnesota?

Luckily, there are ONLY two types of poisonous spiders in Minnesota! And fortunately, they only bite when disturbed or provoked.

Does Minnesota have brown recluse spiders?

Venomous spiders are rare in Minnesota, but every once in a while people are bit by brown recluse spiders. These spiders are abundant in the southern United States and as far north as southern Iowa. …

What's the biggest spider in Minnesota?

Dark fishing spider is a large, robust, nursery web spider. It is the largest fishing spider, the second largest spider in North America, and the largest spider in Minnesota. The adult female body is ⅝″ to 1″ long. It is light brown with light and dark brownish-gray markings.

And fortunately, they only bite when disturbed or provoked. Its important to remember that spiders would rather run away from you than bite. If you come across one of the spiders listed below, please DO NOT DISTURB!

Even though they have highly toxic venom, 15 times stronger than a rattlesnake, they are not aggressive insects. But, if you are one of the few unlucky people who are bitten each year, you should know that the venom affects your nervous system.

If you are bitten, the bite requires medical attention, and the neurotoxic venom can be fatal to small children if untreated. The best places to look for them include overhanging ledges, under benches or stones, near entrances to abandoned rodent burrows, or around outbuildings. Pale yellow-beige color with dark brown markings on its palps, jaws, and on the ends of its feet.

On the bright side, Yellow Sac Spiders rarely bite! The severity of a Yellow Sac bite is not nearly as bad as a Black Widow or Brown Recluse. A study of twenty confirmed Yellow Sac Spider bites found that none resulted in necrosis (decaying of tissue due to cells dying).

Honestly, its pretty uncommon to actually see a Yellow Sac Spider unless youre actively searching for one. Lastly, in 2011, Black-footed Yellow Sac Spiders caused quite a big problem for Mazda.

Minnesota is the home to many spiders of the orb-weaver, cobweb, jumping, crab, and ground family. The deadly spiders found here include the northern widow and the brown recluse, though the latter occurs rarely. The yellow sac, being mildly venomous to humans, also dwell in Minnesota.

State Distribution

The Northern black widow is the only venomous spider with populations occurring naturally in the U.S. state of Minnesota. Fifteen other states have just one indigenous poisonous spider, and it just so happens that the Northern black widow is also the single resident in 11 of these 15 states. Maine is the only U.S. state with no indigenous venomous spiders. The Northern black widow is the most widespread poisonous spider in the country, naturally inhabiting 34 of the 50 states.

Description

Northern black widows have shiny black exteriors. Unlike the other types of black widows in the U.S.—Southern and Western black widows—they don’t usually feature a full red-orange hourglass on the underside of the abdomen; instead, Northerns typically have a pair of reddish bars on the top of the abdomen and another on the underside. They also have a progression of red spots along the abdomen’s top midline. Although size varies, females average about half an inch long with a 1 1/2-inch-long leg span; males are generally less than half this size. Like all spiders, Northern black widows have a cephalothorax with the head and eight legs, and an abdomen bearing web spinnerets. Widows’ abdomens are much larger than their cephalothoraxes, and their spinnerets resemble clusters of cones.

Habitat and Webs

Northern black widows prefer dark places where they can spin their webs and await prey. They don’t typically wander around. Across Minnesota, these widows are drawn to making their homes in bushes, brush or woodpiles, hollowed-out logs, fences, sheds, garages, crawlspaces, abandoned animal burrows and similar out-of-the-way, sheltered places. They aren’t prone to going indoors, but do sometimes; when they do, they’ll usually head for a quiet, dark location. Webs of Northern black widows resemble cobwebs more than more classic round spiderweb.