Pictures of Australian Shepherds?

Is an Australian Shepherd a good family dog?

An active yet easy-going dog, the Australian shepherd loves to romp with children and tends to get along well with other pets. Australian shepherds are great family pets, herding animals, police dogs and competitors in obedience trials.

Do Australian Shepherd shed a lot?

Australian Shepherds are average shedders, and their coat needs regular maintenance, including weekly brushing to keep it clean and prevent matting, and possibly trimming to keep it looking tidy.

Do Australian shepherds bark a lot?

Keep in mind the average Australian Shepherd tends to bark a lot, making it a little more challenging to get him to stop barking unless you give him the ‘speak’ command or there is a situation in which he needs to bark to alert you.

If you’re looking for a pup with piercing eyes, a pretty speckled coat, and the ability to perform parkour, look no further than an Australian Shepherd. With their special coat patterns and often mismatched eyes, every Australian Shepherd is one of a kind, though almost every Aussie is driven by the same desire: to herd and to protect. As the cowboy’s herding dog of choice, an Aussie is best known as a working dog, but these beautifully unique pups make wonderful family companions as well. Just look at these precious pics and tell us you don’t want to take an Aussie home with you.

Despite their name, the Australian Shepherd dog breed originated in the western United States, not Australia, around the time of the Gold Rush in the 1840s. Originally bred to herd livestock, they remain a working dog at heart.

Breed isn’t the only factor that goes into affection levels; dogs who were raised inside a home with people around feel more comfortable with humans and bond more easily. Mouthy dogs are more likely to use their mouths to hold or “herd” their human family members, and they need training to learn that it’s fine to gnaw on chew toys, but not on people.

Originally bred to perform a canine job of some sort, such as retrieving game for hunters or herding livestock, they have the stamina to put in a full workday. They need a significant amount of exercise and mental stimulation, and they’re more likely to spend time jumping, playing, and investigating any new sights and smells. When picking a breed, consider your own activity level and lifestyle, and think about whether you’ll find a frisky, energetic dog invigorating or annoying.

These dynamos need lots of training to learn good manners, and may not be the best fit for a home with young kids or someone who’s elderly or frail. Because he’s got energy to burn, he needs plenty of exercise a walk around the neighborhood won’t cut it and at least a small yard to help him work out his ya-yas. The Aussie’s a real looker who stands out from the crowd thanks to his attractive medium-length coat and dark brown, yellow, blue, green, or amber eyes.

This herding dog’s pushiness with livestock can carry over into the home and, with a timid or inexperienced owner, he may assume the dominant role in the family. Australian Shepherds are average shedders, and their coat needs regular maintenance, including weekly brushing to keep it clean and prevent matting, and possibly trimming to keep it looking tidy. Look for a reputable breeder who tests her breeding dogs to make sure they’re free of genetic diseases that they might pass onto the puppies, and that they have sound temperaments.

The breed is meant to be a functional working dog capable of herding tough stock for miles in rough country or snowdrifts, and it has no smaller size varieties. Bred to be pushy with livestock, Australian Shepherds can and will take the dominant role in the home if you don’t give them firm and confident leadership. Inviting visitors over regularly, and taking him to busy parks, stores that allow dogs, and on leisurely strolls to meet neighbors will also help him polish his social skills.

Living with and training a deaf dog requires patience and time, but there are many aids on the market, such as vibrating collars, to make life easier. Osteochondrosis Dissecans (OCD): This orthopedic condition, caused by improper growth of cartilage in the joints, usually occurs in the elbows, but it has been seen in the shoulders as well. Distichiasis: This condition occurs when an additional row of eyelashes (known as distichia) grow on the oil gland in the dog’s eye and protrude along the edge of the eyelid.

More obvious signs include obesity, mental dullness, lethargy, drooping of the eyelids, low energy levels, and irregular heat cycles. Underground electronic fencing won’t work for this breed: Your Aussie’s desire to go out and herd something will overcome any concern he might have about getting a mild shock. Aussies respond well to training methods that use positive reinforcement rewards such as praise, play, and food and are usually happy to take commands from their trainer.

Australian Shepherd

Despite their name, the Australian Shepherd dog breed originated in the western United States, not Australia, around the time of the Gold Rush in the 1840s. Originally bred to herd livestock, they remain a working dog at heart.You can find these dogs in shelters and rescues, so opt toThe Aussie, as they’re nicknamed, are happiest when they have a job to do. They can be wonderful family companions if their intelligence and energy are channeled into dog sports or activities.Any type of dog can develop arthritis or slow down in old age. DogTime recommendsSee below for complete list of dog breed traits and facts about Australian Shepherds!