This is a question that more than 3300 of our readers have been asking us! Luckily, we have found the most appropriate information for you!

copperhead – copperhead snake stock illustrations Northern Copperhead . Copperhead , Viperidae, drawing.

How do you tell if a snake is a copperhead?

Copperheads have muscular, thick bodies and keeled (ridged) scales. Their heads are “somewhat triangular/arrow-shaped and distinct from the neck,” with a “somewhat distinct ridge separating [the] top of head from side snout between eye and nostril,” said Beane.

What snake is commonly mistaken for a copperhead?

Eastern Ratsnake (A.K.A. Blackrat Snake) The most common snake misidentified as a copperhead is the harmless juvenile Eastern Ratsnake (formerly called the blackrat snake). The Eastern Ratsnake starts life with a strong pattern of gray or brown blotches on a pale gray background.

How poisonous is a copperhead snake?

The North American copperhead is a common species of venomous snake found in the eastern and central United States. Luckily, their venom is not among the most potent, and bites are rarely deadly ; children, the elderly, and immunocompromised people are most at risk.

Where do Copperheads like to live?

Copperheads live in a range of habitats, from terrestrial to semiaquatic, including rocky, forested hillsides and wetlands. They are also known to occupy abandoned and rotting wood or sawdust piles, construction sites and sometimes suburban areas.

Browse 532 copperhead snake stock photos and images available, or search for timber rattlesnake or rattlesnake to find more great stock photos and pictures.

Copperhead A closeup of a Southern Copperhead (Agkistrodon contortrix contortrix) in a pile of fire wood. Characteristics of a Southern Copperhead that are obvious in this image are: coloration, elliptical pupil, and its facial pit. It is slightly below, and to the left of the snake’s eye. The Southern Copperhead has many common names. copperhead snake stock pictures, royalty-free photos & images Characteristics of a Southern Copperhead that are obvious in this image are: coloration, elliptical pupil, and its facial pit. It is slightly below, and to the left of the snake’s eye. Copperhead A closeup of a Southern Copperhead (Agkistrodon contortrix contortrix) sunning itself on a pile of fire wood in the late afternoon. Characteristics of a Southern Copperhead that are obvious in this image are: coloration, elliptical pupil, facial pit, hourglass markings. It is slightly below, and to the left of the snake’s eye. copperhead snake stock pictures, royalty-free photos & images A closeup of a Southern Copperhead (Agkistrodon contortrix contortrix) sunning itself on a pile of fire wood in the late afternoon. Characteristics of a Southern Copperhead that are obvious in this image are: coloration, elliptical pupil, facial pit, hourglass markings. It is slightly below, and to the left of the snake’s eye.

Down Copperhead Road……gorgeous copperhead snake…although venemous is not considered deadly. Almost all snakes in the US that are venemous have cat-slit eyes…the exceptions are Corals and Ringnecks

First, we’ll take a look at Eastern Copperheads and point out their most identifying characteristics. Copperheads are born alive and with the exception of the tail tip, they are colored and patterned the same as adults. The following four photographs are of baby/juvenile Eastern Copperheads. Note the sulfur yellow colored tail tip. The yellow tail tip is used as a lure for frogs, lizards and other prey items. As the snake ages the bright tail tip fades. The only other Virginia snake with a bright yellowish to yellowish green tail tip is the venomous eastern cottonmouth.

Another characteristic of all Virginia’s venomous snakes is the single row of scales on the underside of the tail after the anal plate (vent). Around late August to mid October depending on the temperatures, Eastern Ratsnakes look for a nice warm place to wait out the upcoming winter. Juvenile Northern Black Racers usually do not seek winter refuge in human occupied dwellings. This is completely opposite of the pattern found on the copperhead (wide on the sides and narrow near the back bone). Some adult Northern Watersnakes retain a strong, distinct juvenile pattern while others become a uniformed brown. In an effort to ward off predators these snakes will puff-up, hiss loudly, spread their neck and strike with the mouth closed. Northern Mole Kingsnakes are seldom seen out in the open and are general found under surface cover (plywood, tin, flat rocks, etc..).

Copperhead Snake Pictures, Images and Stock Photos

Copperhead Reference Pictures

22 Pins5yCollection byRick Carter

Copperheads and Similar Looking Harmless Species

First, we’ll take a look at Eastern Copperheads and point out their most identifying characteristics. Copperheads are born alive and with the exception of the tail tip, they are colored and patterned the same as adults. The following four photographs are of baby/juvenile Eastern Copperheads. Note the sulfur yellow colored tail tip. The yellow tail tip is used as a lure for frogs, lizards and other prey items. As the snake ages the bright tail tip fades. The only other Virginia snake with a bright yellowish to yellowish green tail tip is the venomous eastern cottonmouth.* Click on a thumbnail to see a larger versionEastern Copperheads have dark colored crossbands that are for the most part shaped like an hourglass. Usually some of the crossbands are broken and do not connect.The Eastern Copperhead is a pit-viper, as are all three of Virginia’s venomous snake species (Eastern Copperhead, eastern cottonmouth and timber rattlesnake). The “pit” in pit-viper refers to the heating sensing pit located between the eye and the nostrils on the snake’s head. In addition to the heat sensing pit all three venomous snakes in Virginia have vertical pupils. All harmless snakes in Virginia have round pupils and lack the heat sensing pits. Another characteristic of all Virginia’s venomous snakes is the single row of scales on the underside of the tail after the anal plate (vent).While close inspection of a snake’s face and/or its bum is a definitive way to distinguish a venomous snake from a harmless species, it requires one to get dangerously close to a potently dangerous animal. It is far better to learn the pattern and coloration of a few snakes so that a specimen may be identified from a safe distance.

Eastern Copperhead vs. Eastern Ratsnake (A.K.A. Blackrat Snake)

The most common snake misidentified as a copperhead is the harmless juvenile Eastern Ratsnake (formerly called the blackrat snake). The Eastern Ratsnake starts life with a strong pattern of gray or brown blotches on a pale gray background. As the Eastern Ratsnake ages the pattern fades and the snake becomes black, often with just a hint of the juvenile pattern remaining.Around late August to mid October depending on the temperatures, Eastern Ratsnakes look for a nice warm place to wait out the upcoming winter. Frequently these snake will choose a house attic, crawlspace or basement. Luckily, copperheads don’t usually seek winter refuge in human occupied dwellings.

Eastern Copperhead vs. Northern Black Racer

Like the Eastern Ratsnake, black racers are also born with a blotched pattern. However, unlike the Eastern Ratsnake that may retain the juvenile pattern for several years, the pattern of the Northern Black Racer usually fades to a uniformed black within the first two years of life. Juvenile Northern Black Racers usually do not seek winter refuge in human occupied dwellings. Northern Black Racers are usually one of the first snakes to become active when spring arrives.

Eastern Copperhead vs. Northern Watersnake

Juvenile and subadult Northern Watersnakes have a pattern that can vary greatly in color, from dark grayish to a reddish brown. The color of some individuals watersnakes can come close to that of some copperheads, however the pattern on the Northern Watersnake is always narrow on the sides and wide near the backbone. This is completely opposite of the pattern found on the copperhead (wide on the sides and narrow near the back bone). Some adult Northern Watersnakes retain a strong, distinct juvenile pattern while others become a uniformed brown. As the name implies, the Northern Watersnake is usually found in close proximity to water.

Eastern Copperhead vs. Eastern Milksnake

The pattern of the Eastern Milksnake is fairly consistent in Virginia, however the intensity of the colors can vary quite a bit. Usually the blotches across the back are outlined in black. Eastern Milksnakes are found state wide, but are more abundant in the mountainous regions.

Eastern Copperhead vs. Eastern Hog-nosed Snake

Eastern Hog-nosed Snakes are the great actors of the snake world. In an effort to ward off predators these snakes will puff-up, hiss loudly, spread their neck and strike with the mouth closed. If all else fails the hognose snake will roll over and play dead. Found state wide the pattern and coloration of these snake can vary greatly. Eastern hognose snakes prefer sandy soil and primarily feed on toads.The pattern of the eastern hog-nosed snake can vary greatly

Eastern Copperhead vs. Red Cornsnake

The Red Cornsnake also known as the red ratsnake is usually more brightly colored and and has a more reddish hue than that of the copperhead. The pattern of the Red Cornsnake is a blotch that does not extend down the sides to the ground. Unlike the juvenile pattern of the Eastern Ratsnake that fades as the snake ages, the pattern of the Red Cornsnake remains distinct regardless of age.