Nova Scotia Duck Tolling Retriever Rescue?

“Successful rescue of any animal has such a tremendous emotional impact on our lives. Sometimes it is like a roller coastar. Working feverishly to save a life and being minutes late is traumatic and devastating. But the elation and satisfaction of seeing the rescue, plucked from that certain death, blossoming into a loving companion in a successful foster program, and bringing joy to its new forever home is something that makes it all worth while. This success does not happen and is not accomplished by one person, or even a few, it truly is a group effort. Thank You All for visiting our Toller Rescue Inc website, and please consider Volunteering or Donating to our worthy cause.”

We help the potential adoptive family determine IF a Toller is the right breed for them, carefully screen each potential adoptive home which includes a home visit, and stay in contact with each Rescue Toller for life which includes the promise to take back the Rescue Toller no matter what the circumstance. We are eager to assist other Rescue organizations in identification and will help with appropriate placement.

Our rescue work also extends to the rescue of Toller like mixes in dire strights, dogs that have significant characteristics (including temperament) of a pure bred Toller, but lack enough to make us believe they are not pure bred. Many of our volunteers have years of experience in Toller behavior and training, and can discuss potential solutions to the owners problem. We will work to find a local member that can help assist you.

How much is a Nova Scotia duck tolling retriever puppy?

According to the research, people looking to purchase one should be ready to spend around $1,500 for a non-pedigree puppy to $2,500 for a superior puppy from a decent breeder.

How do I adopt a Nova Scotia Duck Toller?

The easiest way to adopt a Nova Scotia Duck-Tolling Retriever would be through a rescue that specializes in Nova Scotia Duck-Tolling Retrievers. A great place to start would be by starting a breed search on Adopt-a-Pet.com. The search will show you all the available Nova Scotia Duck-Tolling Retrievers in your area.

Are Tollers good family dogs?

Temperament. Nova Scotia Duck Tolling Retrievers are known to be very intelligent, curious, alert, outgoing, and high-energy dogs. … They are good family dogs, however during the decision process potential owners should be wary of the physical and mental commitment that is required in order to keep a Toller busy.

Can Tollers be left alone?

The Toller is definitely a breed needing regular human companionship. When left alone for too long he can get a bit destructive. The best way to protect your possessions is to exercise him frequently. … The Toller is a smart little dog, and will learn quickly, but you’ll definitely need to show him you’re the boss.

If you are interested in bringing a rescue Toller into your home, please download and read our Rescue Program General Information. We welcome you to fill out our Adoption Application.

Griffin has now gone to his new forever home in Lancaster Pennsylvania with Jess and Jeremy and his new tollerlike friend, Charlie. I am an early riser and wake up with lots of energy and enjoy morning walks.

Loud noises and fast movements also scare me right now, but if you talk sweetly to me when I am afraid, I will come right back to you and recover quickly. He is current on all shots, has had physicals, has monthly grooming, teeth cleaning and nail trims. He does have a cyst on his neck, but this has been checked multiple times by the vet and it is just a fatty lump.

He walks well on a leash, can sit on command, loves to play in a sprinkler, chews up toys, dog beds, etc., and doesnt always come back to you when he is called. Chip currently weighs 40 pounds, is heartworm negative and up to date on all of his shots. He is looking for a family who is willing to train him and show him lots of love. Peaches is a 6-7 (estimated) month old Duck Tolling Retriever– we dont know much about her past, other than she was found in a field around Christmas.

Pixie is well suited to a loving, active family with some property, no small children and no other dogs! He does walk nicely on a leash and ez-walk harness which is a step in type, except when he sees other dogs, always wants to go play with them. It is currently hard to find food that motivates him, which does make training a bit harder.

Her anxiety seems to have dropped (except during storms, but a thunder jacket and letting her hide in my closet seem to help) and after her spay in November, her coat has come in beautifully! Stella is a beautiful young girl, 2-3 years old.She is about 17-18 inches tall and weighs 37 lbs. In an effort to remove?mats when he was brought into the first shelter, they cut his beautiful Toller fur, but it is evident that this will grow back.

Because Tollers run as much as they swim when tolling, they are smaller and more agile than most other retrievers. Their powerful yet compact build enables them to rush around tirelessly, leaping and retrieving with tail always wagging. Because they were bred to work in icy waters, they have a water-repelling double coat of medium length. A longer coat is not appropriate for a working dog, although the tail feathering should be long, adding to the emphasis of the wagging tail. A white blaze, chest, tail tip, or feet is characteristic.

Tolling is done by the dogs frolicking along the shore, chasing sticks, and occasionally disappearing from sight, an activity that draws curious ducks to the area. Such decoy dogs may have come with European settlers to the New World, where they were used to toll from the Chesapeake Bay to the Maritimes.

The Nova Scotia Duck Tolling Retriever was developed in Yarmouth County, at the southern tip of Nova Scotia, in the early nineteenth century. It was recognized by the Canadian Kennel Club in 1915, with 15 Tollers registered that year. Since then they have proven they are more than just tollers or retrievers, but excel at obedience, agility, tracking, and of course, companionship.

They are affectionate and gentle, but young Tollers can be overly boisterous at times. They learn fast and are generally willing to please, but bore easily and then can be a bit stubborn. Tollers need lots of exercise, especially involving playing and retrieving.

They are devoted family companions that treasure their interaction with humans. Major concerns: none Minor concerns: CHD, PRA Occasionally seen: none Suggested tests: hip, eye, DNA for PRA Life span: 1113 years Note: While the characteristics mentioned here may frequently represent this breed, dogs are individuals whose personalities and appearances will vary.

Please consult the adoption organization for details on a specific pet.

History

Europeans used dogs to toll (Middle English meaning: to lure or decoy) ducks into nets since the seventeenth century. Tolling is done by the dogs frolicking along the shore, chasing sticks, and occasionally disappearing from sight, an activity that draws curious ducks to the area. Such decoy dogs may have come with European settlers to the New World, where they were used to toll from the Chesapeake Bay to the Maritimes. The Nova Scotia Duck Tolling Retriever was developed in Yarmouth County, at the southern tip of Nova Scotia, in the early nineteenth century. Originally known as the Little River Duck Dog or the Yarmouth Toller, the breed later became known as the Nova Scotia Duck Tolling Retriever. It was recognized by the Canadian Kennel Club in 1915, with 15 Tollers registered that year. The first Tollers came to the United States in the 1960s. In 2001 Tollers were admitted into the AKC Miscellaneous class, and were admitted as a regular member of the Sporting Group in 2003. Since then they have proven they are more than just tollers or retrievers, but excel at obedience, agility, tracking, and of course, companionship.

Temperament

As befitting a dog bred to play and retrieve tirelessly, the Toller is very energetic and playful. You cannot throw a ball just once for a Toller! Everything they do is done with gusto, whether it’s obedience, agility, or just walking around the block. They are alert but not hyperactive, and can adjust to many circumstances. They are affectionate and gentle, but young Tollers can be overly boisterous at times. They are good with children, other dogs, and pets. Tollers may be initially wary of strangers, but warm up quickly. They learn fast and are generally willing to please, but bore easily and then can be a bit stubborn. When excited, they can be very vocall and are known for the shrill “Toller scream.”

Upkeep

Tollers need lots of exercise, especially involving playing and retrieving. They love water! Tollers also profit from mental challenges, such as obedience and agility. They are devoted family companions that treasure their interaction with humans. Grooming consists of a thorough weekly brushing.

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