Newfoundland Big Dog Breeds?

|Colour||Black, white with black patches (“Landseer”), brown (not in Canadian standard), and grey (only in US standard, not recognized by other standards)|

They excel at water rescue/ lifesaving because of their muscular build, thick double coat , webbed paws, and swimming abilities. The American Kennel Club (AKC) standard colours of the Newfoundland are black, brown, grey, and white-and-black (sometimes referred to as a Landseer).

Fdration Cynologique Internationale (FCI) consider the ECT Landseer (“European Continental Type”) to be a separate breed. These dogs have huge lung capacity for swimming extremely long distances and a thick, oily, and waterproof double coat which protects them from the chill of icy waters. In the early 1880s, fishermen and explorers from Ireland and England travelled to the Grand Banks of Newfoundland, where they described two main types of working dogs.

Both breeds were used as working dogs to pull fishnets, with the Greater Newfoundland also being used to haul carts and other equipment. One famous Newfoundland was named Seaman , one of the most traveled dogs in human history, who accompanied American explorers Lewis and Clark on their expedition from the Mississippi to the Pacific and back, a journey that took 3 years. Since the 1950s there has been a steady increase in numbers and popularity, despite the fact that the Newfoundland‘s great size and fondness for mud and water makes it unsuitable as a pet for many households.

During the Discovery Channel ‘s second day of coverage of the AKCEukanuba National Championship on December 3, 2006, anchor Bob Goen reported that Newfoundlands exhibit a very strong propensity to rescue people from water. Today, kennel clubs across the United States host Newfoundland Rescue Demonstrations, as well as offering classes in the field. During his famous escape from exile on the island of Elba, rough seas knocked Napoleon overboard.

[21] In 1828, Ann Harvey of Isle aux Morts, her father, her brother, and a Newfoundland named Hairyman saved over 160 Irish immigrants from the wreck of the brig Despatch . In 1881 in Melbourne , Australia, a Newfoundland named Nelson helped rescue Thomas Brown, a cab driver who was swept away by flood waters in Swanston Street on the night of 15 November. In 1995, a 10-month-old Newfoundland named Boo saved a hearing-impaired man from drowning in the Yuba River in Northern California.

[ citation needed ] Newfoundlands were brought and introduced to the St. Bernard breed in the 18th century when the population was threatened by an epidemic of canine distemper . The circus owner, G. Van Hare, trained other Newfoundland dogs to perform a steeplechase routine with baboons dressed up as jockeys to ride them. Napoleon the Wonder Dog became a wildly popular act in London from his debut at the Pavilion Theatre on April 4, 1862, and onward until his untimely death many years later when he slipped and fell during a circus practice session.

At the peak of his fame, his performance was described in London’s Illustrated Sporting News and Theatrical and Musical Review as follows: “Synopsis of his entertainment:– He spells his own name with letters’ also that of the Prince of Wales; and when he is asked what he would say of her Most Gracious Majesty, he puts down letters to form “God save the Queen.” When Napoleon the Wonder Dog died, as a result of a circus accident at the age of 11 years old, his passing was announced in a number of British newspapers, including the Sheffield Daily Telegraph, which mentioned the loss on May 5, 1868, as follows: “DEATH OF A CELEBRATED FOUR-FOOTED ARTISTE. Bashaw (Matthew Cotes Wyatt) : the Earl of Dudley’s favourite dog, and the inspiration for a sculpture by Matthew Cotes Wyatt at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London Bilbo : a lifeguard Newfoundland on Sennen beach in Cornwallcredited with saving three lives [30] Boatswain : pet of English poet Lord Byron and the subject of his poem ” Epitaph to a Dog “.

Bouncer : presented by the children of Newfoundland, with a dog-cart, [31] as a gift to the Duke and Duchess of Cornwall and York (later George V and Queen Mary), during their visit to the colony in 1901 [32] [33] Frank : unofficial mascot of the Orphan Brigade during the American Civil War [34] Gander : the World War II mascot of the Royal Rifles of Canada , also known as “Sergeant Gander”, which was killed in action at the Battle of Hong Kong when he carried a grenade away from wounded soldiers. [36] Gipsy : Lemuel and Emma Wilmarth’s dog which saved the latter from drowning, lived to be 23 years old, and inspired a poem by ASPCA founder Henry Bergh . [37] Sable Chief : World War I mascot of the Royal Newfoundland Regiment Seaman : his name once misread as Scannon, this dog travelled with the Lewis and Clark Expedition from the Mississippi to the Pacific Ocean and back, a 3-year trip (1804 to 1806).

The greatest traveller of my species.My name is SEAMAN,the dog of captain Meriwether Lewis,whom I accompanied to the Pacifick [sic] oceanthrough the interior of the continent of North America [38] ^ Used as a nanny by the Darling family, Nana does not speak or do anything beyond the physical capabilities of a large dog, but acts with apparent understanding of her responsibilities. Barrie based the character of Nana on his dog Luath Archived 2017-03-09 at the Wayback Machine , a Newfoundland.

The dogs of the British Islands: being a series of articles on the points of their various breeds, and the treatment of the diseases to which they are subject . ^ Newfoundland Breed Standard Archived 2012-08-19 at the Wayback Machine American Kennel Club , ‘a sweet-dispositioned dog that acts neither dull nor ill-tempered’ … ‘Sweetness of temperament’ ^ CKC Breed Standards Archived 2013-12-19 at the Wayback Machine Canadian Kennel Club , ‘The Newfoundland‘s expression is soft and reflects the character of the breedbenevolent, intelligent, dignified but capable of fun. ^ Parker, Heidi G.; Dreger, Dayna L.; Rimbault, Maud; Davis, Brian W.; Mullen, Alexandra B.; Carpintero-Ramirez, Gretchen; Ostrander, Elaine A.

“Genomic analyses reveal the influence of geographic origin, migration and hybridization on modern dog breed development” . ^ Illustrated Sporting News and Theatrical and Musical Review, Issue #28, September 20, 1862 ^ “Death of a Celebrated Four-Footed Artiste” . The Web of an Empire: a diary of the imperial tour of their Royal Highnesses the Duke & Duchess of Cornwall & York in 1901 .

Lewis’s Newfoundland dog likely survived the expedition and accompanied his master on his last, fateful journey” (PDF) .

What is the biggest Newfoundland dog?

The Newfoundland is thought to be the strongest of any dog breed, even beating some characteristics of the Great Dane, Mastiff and Irish Wolfhound. Some Newfoundland dogs have been known to weigh over 200 pounds. The largest Newfoundland on record weighed 260 pounds and measured over 6 feet from nose to tail.

Is a Newfoundland considered a giant breed?

The Newfoundland is known as a giant breed ; you’ll know this simply by looking at them! … You can expect male Newfies to stand at an average of 28 inches at the withers, while females average at around 26 inches. Males weigh anywhere from 130 to 150 pounds; female Newfies weigh 100 to 120 pounds.

What dogs are bigger than a Newfoundland?

#1: Newfoundland. Newfoundlands are more than gentle and kind-hearted—they’re a positive force for good. ….#2: Bernese Mountain Dog. ….#3: Mastiff. ….#4: Great Dane. ….#5: Saint Bernard. ….#6: Irish Wolfhound. ….#7: Great Pyrenees. ….#8: Alaskan Malamute.

Are Newfoundlands good family dogs?

The Newfoundland is an affectionate and gentle dog breed that makes a delightful companion. These versatile dogs have a natural instinct to protect and assist people, making them wonderful service dogs and family pets. Typically, this breed gets along very well with children but a Newfie may not realize its size.

Finding a good breeder is a great way to find the right puppy. A good breeder will match you with the right puppy, and will without question have done all the health certifications necessary to screen out health problems as much as is possible. He or she is more interested in placing pups in the right homes than in making big bucks.

Once certain vaccines are given and your vet gives the go-ahead, continue socializing your Newfoundland by taking him to puppy kindergarten class, visits to friends and neighbors, and outings to local shops and businesses. One well-known reference to a Newfoundland is Lord Byrons tribute to his dog Boatswain, whom he described as one who possessed Beauty without Vanity, Strength without Insolence, Courage without Ferocity, and all the Virtues of Man without his Vices. In America, a Newfoundland named Seaman, acquired for $20 (a great sum at the time) accompanied explorers Lewis and Clark as they mapped the great expanse — all the way to Oregon — that comprised Thomas Jeffersons Louisiana Purchase.

The Newfie is a natural lifesaver and can be a good assistant for parents who have a swimming pool or enjoy taking the kids to the lake or ocean, although he should never be solely responsible for their safety. Before individual Newfies can be issued a CHIC number, the breeder must submit OFA hip, elbow and heart evaluations and a DNA test for cystinuria from a qualified laboratory. Using a steel comb and wire slicker brush, groom the coat at least a couple times a week to prevent mats and remove dead hair.

Twice a year, in spring and fall, they shed heavily, called blowing coat. Plan to spend additional time brushing to keep all the hair under control. You should also bear in mind that buying a puppy from websites that offer to ship your dog to you immediately can be a risky venture, as it leaves you no recourse if what you get isnt exactly what you expected. The cost of a Newfoundland puppy varies depending on his place of origin, whether he is male or female, what titles his parents have, and whether he is best suited for the show ring or a pet home.

The massive Newfoundland is a strikingly large, powerful working dog of heavy bone and dignified bearing. The sweet-tempered Newfie is a famously good companion and has earned a reputation as a patient and watchful nanny dog for kids.

The Newfoundland is a large, strong dog breed fromwait for itNewfoundland. They were originally used as a working dog to pull nets for fishermen and haul wood from the forest.

Breed isn’t the only factor that goes into affection levels; dogs who were raised inside a home with people around feel more comfortable with humans and bond more easily. Mouthy dogs are more likely to use their mouths to hold or “herd” their human family members, and they need training to learn that it’s fine to gnaw on chew toys, but not on people.

Mouthy breeds tend to really enjoy a game of fetch, as well as a good chew on a toy that’s been stuffed with kibble and treats. These breeds generally aren’t a good fit for homes with smaller pets that can look like prey, such as cats, hamsters, or small dogs. Originally bred to perform a canine job of some sort, such as retrieving game for hunters or herding livestock, they have the stamina to put in a full workday.

When picking a breed, consider your own activity level and lifestyle, and think about whether you’ll find a frisky, energetic dog invigorating or annoying. These dynamos need lots of training to learn good manners, and may not be the best fit for a home with young kids or someone who’s elderly or frail. Sweet-natured Nana was first introduced to the public by Scottish novelist and playwright J. M. Barrie in his 1904 play, Peter Pan , which later became the well-loved kids’ story we know today.

The breeds are similar in character, sharing a desire to please, intelligence, a strong work ethic, friendliness, adaptability and versatility. What is known is that sometime in the late 18th century, Sir Joseph Banks, an English botanist, acquired several Newfoundlands and in 1775 George Cartwright named them. Inviting visitors over regularly, and taking him to busy parks, stores that allow dogs, and on leisurely strolls to meet neighbors will also help him polish his social skills.

In Newfoundlands, you should expect to see health clearances from the Orthopedic Foundation for Animals (OFA) for hip dysplasia (with a score of fair or better) , elbow dysplasia, hypothyroidism, and von Willebrand’s disease; from Auburn University for thrombopathia; and from the Canine Eye Registry Foundation (CERF) certifying that eyes are normal. It’s important to remember that seizures can be caused by many other things than idiopathic epilepsy, such as metabolic disorders, infectious diseases that affect the brain, tumors, exposure to poisons, severe head injuries, and more. The dog is unable to belch or vomit to rid himself of the excess air in his stomach, and blood flow to the heart is impeded.

Don’t let your Newfoundland puppy run and play on very hard surfaces such as pavement or pull a cart until he’s at least two years old and his joints are fully formed. Make grooming a positive experience filled with praise and rewards, and you’ll lay the groundwork for easy veterinary exams and other handling when he’s an adult. As you groom, check for sores, rashes, or signs of infection such as redness, tenderness, or inflammation on the skin, in the nose, mouth, and eyes, and on the feet.

This cuddly giant is highly tolerant of children, which is important because he’s a kid magnet thanks to his size and wealth of soft fur.

Appearance[edit]

Newfoundlands (‘Newfs’ or ‘Newfies’) have webbed paws and a water-resistant coat.The American Kennel Club (AKC) standard colours of the Newfoundland are black, brown, grey, and white-and-black (sometimes referred to as a Landseer). Other colours are possible but are not considered rare or more valuable. The Kennel Club (KC) permits only black, brown, and white/black; the Canadian Kennel Club (CKC) permits only black and white/black. The “Landseer” pattern is named after the artist, Sir Edwin Henry Landseer, who featured them in many of his paintings. Fédération Cynologique Internationale (FCI) consider the ECT Landseer (“European Continental Type”) to be a separate breed. It is a taller, more narrow white dog with black markings not bred with a Newfoundland.The Newfoundland‘s extremely large bones give it mass, while its large musculature gives it the power it needs to take on rough ocean waves and powerful tides. These dogs have huge lung capacity for swimming extremely long distances and a thick, oily, and waterproof double coat which protects them from the chill of icy waters.In the water, the Newfoundland‘s massive webbed paws give it maximum propulsion. The swimming stroke is not an ordinary dog paddle: Unlike other dogs, the Newfoundland moves its limbs in a down-and-out motion giving more power to every stroke.

Temperament[edit]

The Newfoundland is known for its calm and docile nature and its strength. They are very loyal, have a mild nature, and make great working dogs. It is for this reason that this breed is known as “the gentle giant”. International kennel clubs generally describe the breed as having a sweet temper.A Newfoundland‘s good, sweet nature is so important, it is listed in the Breed Standards of many countries; dogs exhibiting poor temperament or aggression are disqualified from showing and should never be used to breed. The breed standard in the United States reads that “Sweetness of temperament is the hallmark of the Newfoundland; this is the most important single characteristic of the breed.”

Health[edit]

There are several health problems associated with Newfoundlands. Newfoundlands are prone to hip dysplasia (a malformed ball and socket in the hip joint). They also get elbow dysplasia, and cystinuria (a hereditary defect that forms calculi stones in the bladder). Another genetic problem is subvalvular aortic stenosis (SAS). This is a common heart defect in Newfoundlands involving defective heart valves. SAS can cause sudden death at an early age. It is similar to having a heart attack. It is common that “Newfs” live to be 8 to 10 years of age; 10 years is a commonly cited life expectancy.

Origin[edit]

Genome analysis indicates that Newfoundlands are related to the Irish water spaniel, Labrador Retriever, and Curly-Coated Retriever.The Newfoundland was originally bred and used as working dogs for fishermen in Newfoundland.In the early 1880s, fishermen and explorers from Ireland and England travelled to the Grand Banks of Newfoundland, where they described two main types of working dogs. One was heavily built, large with a longish coat, and the other medium-sized in build – an active, smooth-coated water dog. The heavier breed was known as the Greater Newfoundland, or Newfoundland. The smaller breed was known as the Lesser Newfoundland, or St. John’s water dog. The St. John’s water dog became the founding breed of modern retrievers. Both breeds were used as working dogs to pull fishnets, with the Greater Newfoundland also being used to haul carts and other equipment.It has also been proposed that the original Newfoundland that lived on the island was smaller;

Reputation[edit]

The breed’s working role was varied. Many tales have been told of the courage displayed by Newfoundlands in adventuring and lifesaving exploits. Over the last two centuries, this has inspired a number of artists, who have portrayed the dogs in paint, stone, bronze, and porcelain. One famous Newfoundland was named Seaman, one of the most traveled dogs in human history, who accompanied American explorers Lewis and Clark on their expedition from the Mississippi to the Pacific and back, a journey that took 3 years. A statue of him is included in many Lewis and Clark monuments. Many children’s books have been written about him (see Seaman (dog)#Children’s books about Seaman).The breed prospered in the United Kingdom, until 1914 and again in 1939, when its numbers were almost fatally depleted by wartime restrictions. Since the 1950s there has been a steady increase in numbers and popularity, despite the fact that the Newfoundland‘s great size and fondness for mud and water makes it unsuitable as a pet for many households.

Relationship to other breeds[edit]

During the Discovery Channel’s second day of coverage of the AKC Eukanuba National Championship on December 3, 2006, anchor Bob Goen reported that Newfoundlands exhibit a very strong propensity to rescue people from water. Goen stated that one Newfoundland alone once aided the rescue of 63 shipwrecked sailors. Today, kennel clubs across the United States host Newfoundland Rescue Demonstrations, as well as offering classes in the field. Many harbour boat tours in St. John’s have a dog on board for local charm as well as for passenger safety.Further evidence of Newfoundlands’ ability to rescue or support life-saving activities was cited in a 2007 article by the BBC.

Napoleon the Wonder Dog[edit]

A famous all-black Newfoundland performed as the star attraction in Van Hare’s Magic Circus from 1862 and for many years thereafter in one of England’s founding circus acts, traveling throughout Europe. The circus dog was known as the “Thousand Guinea Dog Napoleon” or “Napoleon the Wonder Dog.” The circus owner, G. Van Hare, trained other Newfoundland dogs to perform a steeplechase routine with baboons dressed up as jockeys to ride them. Nonetheless, his “wizard dog” Napoleon was his favourite and held a special position in the Magic Circus. Napoleon would compete at jumping against human rivals, leaping over horses from a springboard, and dancing to music.Napoleon the Wonder Dog became a wildly popular act in London from his debut at the Pavilion Theatre on April 4, 1862, and onward until his untimely death many years later when he slipped and fell during a circus practice session. At the peak of his fame, his performance was described in London’s Illustrated Sporting News and Theatrical and Musical Review as follows: “Synopsis of his entertainment:– He spells his own name with letters’ also that of the Prince of Wales; and when he is asked what he would say of her Most Gracious Majesty, he puts down letters to form “God save the Queen.” He plays any gentleman a game of cards and performs the celebrated three-card trick upon which his master backs him at 100 to 1. Also “The Disappearance,” a la Robin. He performs in a circus the same as a trick horse,When Napoleon the Wonder Dog died, as a result of a circus accident at the age of 11 years old, his passing was announced in a number of British newspapers, including the Sheffield Daily Telegraph, which mentioned the loss on May 5, 1868, as follows: “DEATH OF A CELEBRATED FOUR-FOOTED ARTISTE. — Mr. Van Hare’s renowned dog, Napoleon, designated ‘The Wizard Dog,’ died on 24th ult., aged twelve years. He was a noble specimen of the Newfoundland breed (weighing near 200 lbs.) for which he took the prize at the first Agricultural Hall Dog Show. Besides his magnificent appearance and symmetry, he was the most extraordinary sagacious and highly-trained animal ever known. He is now being preserved and beautifully mounted by the celebrated naturalist, Mr. Edwin Ward. — Era.”

See also[edit]

My name is SEAMAN,the dog of captain Meriwether Lewis,whom I accompanied to the Pacifick [sic] oceanthrough the interior of the continent of North America

Finding a Newfoundland

Whether you want to go with a breeder or get your dog from a shelter or rescue, here are some things to keep in mind.

Choosing a Newfoundland Breeder

Finding a good breeder is a great way to find the right puppy. A good breeder will match you with the right puppy, and will without question have done all the health certifications necessary to screen out health problems as much as is possible. He or she is more interested in placing pups in the right homes than in making big bucks.
Good breeders will welcome your questions about temperament, health clearances and what the dogs are like to live with and come right back at you with questions of their own about what you’re looking for in a dog and what kind of life you can provide for him. A good breeder can tell you about the history of the breed, explain why one puppy is considered pet quality while another is not, and discuss what health problems affect the breed and the steps she takes take to avoid those problems.
Find a breeder who is a member in good standing of the Newfoundland Club of America (NCA) and who has agreed to abide by its Ethics Guide, which prohibits selling puppies to or through pet stores and selling only with a written contract. The NCA has guidelines on how to interview and select a Newfie breeder. Look for one who wants to be a resource for you throughout your dog’s life.
Avoid breeders who only seem interested in how quickly they can unload a puppy on you and whether your credit card will go through. You should also bear in mind that buying a puppy from websites that offer to ship your dog to you immediately can be a risky venture, as it leaves you no recourse if what you get isn’t exactly what you expected. Put at least as much effort into researching your puppy as you would into choosing a new car or expensive appliance. It will save you money in the long run.
Many reputable breeders have websites, so how can you tell who’s good and who’s not? Red flags include puppies always being available, multiple litters on the premises, having your choice of any puppy, and the ability to pay online with a credit card. Those things are convenient, but they are almost never associated with reputable breeders.
Whether you’re planning to get your new best friend from a breeder, a pet store, or another source, don’t forget that old adage “let the buyer beware”. Disreputable breeders and facilities that deal with puppy mills can be hard to distinguish from reliable operations. There’s no 100% guaranteed way to make sure you’ll never purchase a sick puppy, but researching the breed (so you know what to expect), checking out the facility (to identify unhealthy conditions or sick animals), and asking the right questions can reduce the chances of heading into a disastrous situation. And don’t forget to ask your veterinarian, who can often refer you to a reputable breeder, breed rescue organization, or other reliable source for healthy puppies.
The cost of a Newfoundland puppy varies depending on his place of origin, whether he is male or female, what titles his parents have, and whether he is best suited for the show ring or a pet home. The puppy you buy should have been raised in a clean home environment, from parents with health clearances and conformation (show) and, ideally, working titles to prove that they are good specimens of the breed.Puppies should be temperament tested, vetted, dewormed, and socialized to give them a healthy, confidentstart in life.
Before you decide to buy a puppy, consider whether an adult Newfie might better suit your needs and lifestyle. Puppies are loads of fun, but they require a lot of time and effort before they grow up to become the dog of your dreams. An adult Newfie may already have some training and will probably be less active, destructive and demanding than a puppy.
With an adult, you know more about what you’re getting in terms of personality and health and you can find adults through breeders or shelters. If you are interested in acquiring an older dog through breeders, ask them about purchasing a retired show dog or if they know of an adult dog who needs a new home. If you want to adopt a dog, read the advice below on how to do that.

Newfoundland

The Newfoundland is a large, strong dog breed from—wait for it—Newfoundland. They were originally used as a working dog to pull nets for fishermen and haul wood from the forest.They’re a capable and hardworking dog, well suited to work on land or water. They’re a strong swimmer and equally strong “pack horse.” Sweet-natured and responsive, they make a wonderful family companion as well.DogTime recommendsSee all dog breed traits and facts about Newfoundlands below!