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This is a question that more than 7137 of our readers have been asking us! Luckily, we have found the most appropriate information for you!

You absolutely can live in a fur-free house and not suffer from allergies. In fact, there are 40 different (small and big) hypoallergenic dog breeds to choose from.

Their favorite pastimes include being brushed (of course), playing, running, and being with their owner. Similar to their Terrier cousins, the Affenpinscher were bred to hunt rats, but has since retired from their mission and is now a trouble-making and loving companion. A clever hunting breed originating from the Congo, this is a unique dog with a sharp wit. Being part of the Terrier family also means they have a very high prey drive, and any little critter they cross paths with will cause them to bark and give chase. Cheerful, loving, and a little trouble maker, the Bichon Frise has plenty of personality to share with everyone around her. The Bolognese is an uncommon breed that is closely related to the Bichon Frise, Maltese, and Havanese. The Border Terrier is fiercely intelligent and loyal, but they come with a high list of demands, that (quite honestly) not every owner is up for. The Biewer is an affection and tiny bundle of joy that loves to spend time with family and friends. The Brussels Griffon can be a challenging dog, but will reward you with endless love and attention for your efforts. These dogs, like Toto, are brave, intelligent, and ready to follow you on adventures (or at least your daily chores). The Cairn Terrier has plenty of energy to burn, and, despite being small, they are very active and need to run everyday. Without proper daily exercise, the Cairn Terrier will get bored and resort to digging, barking, and chewing. Chinese Crested dogs are picky, and prefer the company of their owner over strangers or children. Not surprisingly, they don’t fair well in the cold and prefer hot climates and warm blankets. These unique characters are fun loving, intelligent, and gentle, but can be extremely challenging when it comes to training. And while training these dogs may be a slow process, it is necessary to curb excessive barking and other bad habits. They are very adaptable to your lifestyle and are content going on daily walks, or even going full tilt with agility or obedience classes. A princess (or prince) that prefers the finer things in life, and that often includes running, playing, and spending time with loved ones. The Maltese become very attached to their owners, and they don’t like being left alone or else they may resort to barking and destructive behavior. Maltese are incredibly intelligent but also impatient, so children and other dogs may annoy this breed. Schnauzers love to be the center of attention; they’ll put on a show for you and your friends and are amazing comedians. Terriers love every second spent with their family, showing their deeply affectionate side when at home. Scottish Terriers favorite pastime is digging, because they were originally bred for hunting foxes and badgers. To deter digging and boredom, they need time to go on daily walks and explore the world beyond the backyard. Their good natured attitude makes them very compatible for just about anything; kids, families, and other dogs are not a problem – the more the merrier. Shih Tzu’s can be quite energetic, and they love playtime and exploring to let off some of that excess energy. Poodles live for learning and training, so they need daily exercise, or they might result to destructive behavior. They tend to grow calmer as they mature, but still need ways to stimulate their body and mind. Poodles can be a groomers dream dog, their soft frizzy hair makes them perfect for styling and trying out the latest trends. A sometimes overly confident trouble-maker, the West Highland Terrier (or “Westie” for short) is a lovable handful but perfect for the right owners. With all that stubbornness the Westie can be difficult to train, but they are a very sensitive soul and do not respond well to scolding. These dogs were originally bred to hunt rodents, and these traits are still very apparent as their prey drive is off the charts. Yorkies live for companionship, and show endless love and trust for their owner. They were born for guard duty, and they take their job seriously, which makes them excellent watch dogs. The Kerry Blue Terrier is a strong-headed working breed, and were originally bred for herding and guarding. In fact, many animals will peak their high prey drive, so early socialization and training are essential. As a working breed, the Blue Terrier needs a lot of daily exercise, and they absolutely love having a routine or a “job”. Often compared to as a smaller version of a Water Spaniel, these dogs carry very similar traits. This breed was originally used as a water retrieval dog dating back over 200 years ago! With a strong desire to work all day long, these a very high energy dogs that love having a job. Originally bred to hunt foxes and protect livestock, the Lakeland Terrier is there to watch and defend what’s most important. As a hunting dog, they’re quick and agile, and have intense bursts of energy to help them give chase. With all that speed and agility, they can run away extremely fast, and can easily clear most fences. These dogs are highly intelligent, and they are fully aware of just how smart they are, so they can be a very clever and mischievous breed. They love to please their owners and are very receptive to training, which is why they are a common sight in agility and hunting. Mistreating their companions in ancient Tibet was believed to bring bad luck to the entire village. The Wheaten Terrier is always on the lookout for fun; they love to run and play at a moment’s notice. However, they do carry some of the typical Terrier traits: digging, chasing, and barking are common when bored. You can expect the Afghan to give chase or hunt small critters or even other neighborhood pets at a moments notice. Combined with their independent nature, they will often go running off (at very high speeds) with no hope of you catching them. However, these dogs are especially sensitive to any kind of scolding, and require very gentle and patient owners. Similar to its Terrier relatives, the Airdale was bred for working and hunting, but built to be more agile and better at swimming. Another shared trait is their seemingly unlimited energy; so these dogs need an outlet or else they’ll resort to destructive behavior. They are big and powerful, sometimes weighing up to 100 pounds, yet they can haul that weight around no problem with their fast legs. Despite their “tough-guy” attitude, they are truly gentle and affectionate creatures with their loved ones and are great with children, but wary of strangers and other dogs. Water Spaniels are the class-clown; their boundless energy and playfulness make them absolutely hilarious dogs that love attention. The exotic looking coat develops into ‘cords’ as they mature and needs a lot of work to maintain. You’ll be grooming, bathing, and brushing this coat out very often because, just like a mop, it collects dirt very quickly. These dogs are calm and gentle leaders, showing deep love for their family. They have short bursts of energy and play, but still enjoy daytime naps and love being the fearless hero for your home. Despite that heavy coat, they move quickly and intently, and they come equipped with a powerful bark to scare off intruders. Their temperament makes them difficulty for the average owner and comes with a long list of challenges and responsibilities. With their brilliant mind and eagerness to please, Labradoodles are fairly easy to train (once they’ve calmed down). Because this is a working breed they have an absolute ton of energy, and require strenuous daily activity, or else they may become bored and destructive. There is still no hard evidence that this dog is completely hypoallergenic or shed-free, and it seems to vary between different litters. One of the oldest breeds known to man, the Saluki is believed to have existed over 6,000 years ago. Training a Poodle is an absolute joy, they are receptive and keen to please their owners, which is why they excel at agility and obedience courses. With their intelligence and energy combined, they can become bored and resort to finding trouble as an outlet. Even hypoallergenic breeds can cause allergic reactions if they are not bathed and groomed regularly, due to the buildup of allergen-related proteins on the skin. Regular brushing will help loosen up dirt and debris, allow natural oils to flow through their coat, and detangle painful mats. Speaking of which: expect to visit a professional groomer once every 4 to 8 weeks (it varies with different breeds).

Which medium sized dogs shed the least?

Kerry Blue Terrier..Petit Basset Griffon Vendeen..Portuguese Water Dog..Puli..Standard Schnauzer..Soft Coated Wheaten Terrier..Tibetan Terrier..Whippet.

What is the best medium sized dog?

of 20. Airedale Terrier. ….of 20. English Cocker Spaniel. ….of 20. Chinese Shar-Pei. ….of 20. Bluetick Coonhound. ….of 20. Australian Cattle Dog. ….of 20. Border Collie. ….of 20. Bulldog. ….of 20. Vizsla.

What is a good medium sized hypoallergenic dog?

Aussiedoodle (medium to large dog).Basenji (African Hunting Dog).Bedlington Terrier..Border Terrier (small to medium dog).Goldendoodles (Groodle) (medium to large dog).Irish Terrier..Kerry Blue Terrier..Labradoodle (medium to large dog)

What is the calmest medium sized dog?

Cavalier King Charles Spaniel. The Cavalier King Charles Spaniel is super adaptable and agreeable. ….Irish Wolfhound. ….St. Bernard. ….Bernese Mountain Dog. ….Irish Setter. ….Pekingese. ….Scottish Deerhound. ….Greyhound.

Are you on the hunt for a four-legged companion, but worried about your pet allergy? In this guide, we’ll tell you all about the world’s hypoallergenic dog breeds. With a detailed list of the best hypoallergenic dogs, we hope it helps you find the right doggo for your family!

If you are searching for a hypoallergenic breed, we’ve put together this ultimate guide for you to explore before you go and start stocking up on dog supplies . People with pet allergies suffer from a range of symptoms, sometimes so mild that you might not even realize that your furry friends are the cause. – then you probably haven’t dealt with a severe reaction yet, but that doesn’t mean you should take precautions to protect yourself, and make smart and responsible choices if you want to get a dog yourself. If you experience any of these symptoms after coming in contact with a dog, then, sorry to be the bearer of bad news, but you likely have an allergy: Runny nose Watery or bloodshot eyes Sneezing Coughing Hives or rashes at the site of contact Wheezing or shortness of breath Disequilibrium or dizziness Many dog owners accept the symptoms and suffering because the rewards of having a lovable pet outweigh the mild inconvenience of a runny nose. Most of the time, the real cause of an allergic reaction to pets is a protein in their saliva and urine. Less fur gathering around your home means less dander accumulating on the floors and in the air… and more control over your allergies! Regularly vacuuming these surfaces can significantly reduce the amount of dander that ends up tracking all over your house. It’s important to make sure you choose the right kind of shampoo that won’t dry out your pet’s fur and skin causing irritation or itchiness. Before you go blaming your sniffles and itchy eyes on the doggo, make sure there isn’t another irritant that could be causing the reaction. Allergy tests can help you pinpoint all of the different allergens that your body reacts to and can spare your dog some of the blame! These hypoallergenic small dogs make our list because they shed minimally, but keep in mind… this bushy breed still requires a lot of grooming. Standing at 14 to 16 inches tall and weighing in at 20 to 40 pounds, they make for sweet and loving family dogs, and surprisingly excellent watchdogs! Native to Tibet, these long-haired lookers were originally bred to be companions to Buddhist monks and the guard dogs of nomadic herdsmen. Due to their nomadic nature, Tibetan Terriers easily adapt to a variety of different environments. Maltese Terriers are known for their gorgeous white silky coats, but you won’t find them shedding on your furniture or clothes. A long time ago, you could find Maltese terriers in a variety of coat colours, but today they’re always white. Typically 9 to 10 inches tall and 9 to 16 pounds, these affectionate doggos are happy living in smaller spaces as long as they’re spending time with their humans! This old dog breed was bred to resemble lions as depicted in ancient Oriental art. Another nickname for this beloved member of the Toy Group is the Chrysanthemum Dog because of their unique hairstyle. Shi Tzus are believed to be the “little lion dogs” that Marco Polo wrote about in the 13th Century. While they tend to bond with one person more than others, Brussels Griffon dogs make excellent pets for families with children. Belgium bred, their impressive hunting skills were put to good use when it came to keeping rodents out of stables. They often show off their skills in performance sports for dogs like agility races and obedience competitions! Their coat sheds very little and they are considered a hypoallergenic breed, but the Portuguese Water Dog still requires regular grooming. Overall though, Porties are easily adaptable to any living environment and make for affectionate family dogs! They have a history of working on fishing boats as part of the crew along the coast of Portugal to Newfoundland. Porties thrive with proper training and often compete in performance sports as well as therapy work. Whether you live in an apartment or house, Soft-coated Wheaten Terriers are a wonderful breed that requires moderate exercise and are notorious for their friendly demeanour. Called the “poor man’s wolfhound”, the Wheaten was used for herding, guarding livestock, and hunting vermin. Poodles, coming in three different sizes (Toy, Miniature, and Standard), are one of the most popular dogs in the world. Great as a family pet or an apartment dwelling companion, poodles are a popular choice for a hypoallergenic breed. As one of the oldest breeds of dogs, poodles were originally bred in Germany as water retrievers to fetch prey for hunters. Their name “poodle” derives from the German word “pudel” or “pudelin”, which translates to ‘splash in water”. Gypsies and nomadic performers would train them to do special tricks, dress them up in costumes and sculpt their coats into fancy designs. Affectionately nicknamed the Westie, the West Highland White Terrier is a friendly, active little dog with a double coat. Loyal to their owners, Westies are also hardy, make great watchdogs, and are hypoallergenic dogs. When Colonel Malcolm of Poltalloch was hunting foxes, he sadly shot and killed one of his wheaten-coloured Cairn terriers. As a highly intelligent breed, they were often trained for circus performances or to lead the blind during the late 1800s. Early on, the breed earned the nickname “Velcro Dog” because of how close they keep to their owners. Both Hairless and Powderpuff (with soft hair all over) varieties of Chinese Crested are hypoallergenic. In our cool Canadian climate, coats and boots are a must for this cute hypoallergenic dog breed. While Scotties may not run marathons with you, they love to chase, dig and make an awesome walking partner. One of the most iconic Scottish Terriers is memorialized in a Monopoly token and Scotties have occupied the White House on at least two occasions (Franklin D. Roosevelt and George W. Bush). During the 19th century, a military man named George the 4th Earl of Dumbarton had a brave pack of Scottish Terriers. A hunting and companion dog, the Irish Water Spaniel is friendly, active, and devoted to its owners. The breed is rare to come across these days in North America, but are very popular working dogs in Ireland. The coat does need regular grooming attention, but the breed is considered hypoallergenic as it sheds less dander than many other dogs. Cairns were originally bred over 200 years ago on the Isle of Skye by Captain Martin Macleod. A Cairn Terrier’s coat can change colour multiple times over the course of several years. They are a mix between two of the most popular dog breeds in Canada , a Labrador Retriever and a standard or miniature Poodle. The Border Terrier was bred for hunting foxes and rodents, but this intelligent and hardy breed also makes a lively companion or family pet. The early days of the breed started in northeast England working for farmers as hunters of foxes and other vermin. Schnauzers make excellent watchdogs, guard dogs, and vermin hunters, but are also popular as companion pets due to their loyal nature and hypoallergenic coat. Certain characteristics that are distinct to the Schnauzer were actually a result of crossbreeding with the gray Wolfspitz and black German poodles in the 1800s. Originally bred to hunt rodents, Yorkies can make loyal and devoted companion pets. Though the exact origins of the Yorkshire Terrier breed are unknown, they are thought to have been bred by working North Englishmen to catch rats in clothing and wood mills. Like its close relative the Yorkie, the Australian Silky Terrier is bold despite its small size. What we know as the Bouvier des Flandres now was originally three different dog breeds, however, they were dissolved into one after nearly all three were extinct during WWI. While the Bouvier’s exact origin is unknown, it is believed that their ancestors may include early sheepdogs, the Dutch Griffon, and the Barbet. In Belgium, a Bouvier is required to be a proven working dog in order to win the title of conformation champion. The alert and energetic Basenji is originally from Central Africa and was bred as a hunting dog. They were originally found in the Congo region of Africa and are believed to be one of the oldest breeds of domesticated dogs. Not every pet allergy is limited to dander and fur, so just because a dog is low-shed, doesn’t mean you can’t be allergic to them. Pet allergies often include saliva and urine, so talk to your doctor before committing to a dog that you may react to. If your heart is set of a shaggier breed, then there are some things you can do to help reduce the dander and shedding in your home, and hopefully, make your allergies tolerable. Take a look at our New Dog Checklist blog to make sure that you have all the toys, treats, and tools you need to prepare for your new furry family member.

If you want a cuddly pet, but can’t stand the sniffles you get when you bury your face in that soft, sweet fur, hypoallergenic dogs might be the answer to your puppy prayers. Hypoallergenic dogs who don’t shed are the perfect choice for potential pup parents who need a sneeze-free friend. Whether you can’t stand picking fur off your clothes or suffer from canine-induced allergy attacks, don’t count out dog ownership just yet. The experts at the American Kennel Club have pointed us toward these adorable dogs who will give you all of their love, without leaving all of their fur everywhere. Go ahead, start picking out animal accessories.

As for that fancy “poodle clip,” the traditional cut protects the water-loving dogs’ joints and vital organs while swimming, in addition to looking heckin’ adorable. You can choose between cutting their soft fur into a sporty trim or letting it grow long, depending on how much maintenance you prefer. We already fell in love with the giant Schnauzers’ iconic shaggy eyebrows, but all that fur doesn’t mean they’ll make you sniffle. Because they were originally bred for the mountains in Afghanistan, they have long, shiny hair that can turn into a tangle without routine maintenance. Professionals spend a lot of time styling the curly, wooly coat for dog shows to get them that picture perfect. This small breed loves brisk walks and clowning around, so lots of Lhasa owners keep their full-grown pets in the shorter, trimmer “puppy cut” to keep trimming minimal.

When you’re deciding what dog breeds might be the right fit for your family, there’s a lot to consider. But for most potential pet owners, one of the most important factors when choosing a companion for their family?

As long as they get their exercise, Bedlington terriers make for relaxed, calm house dogs. Bedlington terriers should be brushed every few days and groomed and trimmed every month to avoid mats, tangles, and other coat issues. Bichon Frises need to be kept on a strict grooming schedule (including daily brushing and a monthly bath and trim) in order to keep their coat in top shape. ), making them a favorite for families who want a small dog who still enjoys walking, playing, and exploring the outdoors. Named after the city of Brussels, Belgium, these short, sturdy dogs have short hair that requires minimal grooming; weekly brushing and the occasional bath and trim is all that’s necessary to keep the Brussels Griffon properly groomed. When it comes to grooming and maintenance, the Cairn terrier falls somewhere in the middle of the pack; weekly brushing, monthly baths, and the occasional hand-stripping will help maintain the coat’s health and texture. The Chinese Crested dog does have some hair on their head (which can resemble pigtails), ankles, and tail—but they don’t shed much. Because the Chinese Crested dog is mostly bald, they’re prone to skin irritation (including sunburn! )—which makes skin care (including targeted treatments and sunscreen ) this breed’s top grooming concern. Coton de Tulear This “Royal Dog of Madagascar” might have a regal-sounding name, but there’s nothing overly fancy about their personality; in fact, their temperament is closer to the jester than the king! The Coton de Tulear gets its name thanks to its cotton-like coat—but that cotton-like coat will stay on the dog’s body, not on your furniture. Thanks to their small size and relatively low activity needs, they’re also a heavy favorite among city and apartment dwellers. They can be suspicious of strangers, but this breed is fiercely loyal to their humans—and they also have a fun, playful side that makes them a great companion dog. Lhasa Apso’s have one of the most luxurious coats in the animal kingdom, which can grow to the ground without regular trims. But even though their hair grows long, it doesn’t shed—just prepare yourself for a regular grooming schedule to keep their coat intact. Similar to the Miniature Schnauzer, Scottish terriers have long hair around the face (and elsewhere on the body), but won’t shed with regular brushing (about once a week should be plenty). Shih Tzus should also be bathed every three to four weeks to keep the coat clean, healthy, and shiny. More commonly known as a Yorkie, Yorkshire terriers are little dogs with a thin coat that can easily grow to the floor with regular grooming. Known as the “truffle dog” of Italy (thanks to its history hunting the pricey mushroom) this sweet, adorable, curly-haired breed makes a great family dog—especially when you consider how little they shed. The Lagotta Romagnolo’s curly coat more closely resembles human hair than dog fur—and needs to be treated accordingly with regular brushings (once per week), baths, and trims. The Portuguese water dog is the perfect mix of lovable, adventurous, and affectionate. Just make sure to brush the Portuguese water dog every week; otherwise, their coat can get matted. The Tibetan terrier is alert, intelligent, and extremely loyal—making them the perfect pet to watch over your family. And just like the Lhasa Apso needs to be brushed every few days and bathed and groomed every month or so, you should plan to do the same for the Tibetan Terrier. They have a distinct personality that interestingly blends a sense of both silliness and aloofness—and they also happen to be extremely low-shedding. They might not shed much, but Afghan hounds have a robust coat—and that coat requires hours of brushing every week (plus regular baths) in order to stay healthy, clean, and mat-free. If you decide to add an Afghan hound to your family, just be prepared for a whole lot of grooming. And just like their miniature counterparts, Giant Schnauzers won’t shed (much) from their mustache, face, or anywhere else on their body. They also happen to be curious, courageous, energetic, and playful—making them a great pet for an active family. Labradoodle Labrador retrievers are one of the most friendly and loving breeds in the animal kingdom—but they definitely shed. Just like a poodle, you should plan to brush your Labradoodle every day to avoid mats—and regular baths (every month or so) will keep their coat clean and healthy.

Small Non Shedding Dogs

1. Australian Silky Terrier

As you may have already guessed, the ‘Silky’ has an elegant, silky coat that extends from head to toe.Their favorite pastimes include being brushed (of course), playing, running, and being with their owner.These are very active dogs, and they need daily stimulation or they may become bored and destructive.The Silky are brave characters, often displaying their boldness and never showing any fear. However, even the bravest have time for play, and they are always looking for some fun.

2. Affenpinscher

Similar to their Terrier cousins, the Affenpinscher were bred to hunt rats, but has since retired from their mission and is now a trouble-making and loving companion.They still carry their fearless traits from their hunting days, and have no shortage of confidence.Digging and barking are other favorite hobbies, and ones that take training and patience to subdue.But despite a few bad habits, the Affenpinscher is keen to please their owners and quite receptive to training.CC Image courtesy of Ingunn Axelsen

3. Basenji

A clever hunting breed originating from the Congo, this is a unique dog with a sharp wit.The Basenji is a free-roaming working dog, and they wear their independence like a badge of honor.But that doesn’t mean they won’t become a wonderful companion. They are kind and loving, and crave all your attention. However, they do come with a high list of needs that must be met.

4. Bedlington Terrier

Like it’s Terrier cousins, this Bedlington Terrier was originally bred for hunting.Although they wear lamb’s clothing, these dogs are bold and make excellent watch dogs.Being part of the Terrier family also means they have a very high prey drive, and any little critter they cross paths with will cause them to bark and give chase.Therefore, a little daily exercise goes a long way with the Bedlington. The last thing you want is a bored Terrier.

5. Bichon Frise

Cheerful, loving, and a little trouble maker, the Bichon Frise has plenty of personality to share with everyone around her.The Bichon is described as affectionate, silly, and gentle. They prefer to be your full-time companion, so they do not like being left alone for long periods of time.Because these little guys are so full of love and energy, they need to get out everyday for some exercise. Yet are especially sensitive to scolding.They need gentle training and a positive environment to really flourish.

6. Bolognese

The Bolognese is an uncommon breed that is closely related to the Bichon Frise, Maltese, and Havanese.These are intelligent problem-solvers, but want nothing more than to be with their owner.Companionship is their number one priority, and they have no shortage of love and affection.But with all that attachment, these dogs can have separation anxiety and can be noisy when left alone for too long.

7. Border Terrier

Work hard and play hard – that’s the Border Terrier motto.They were originally bred to hunt foxes, so running and digging comes pre-wired. Which means this can be a challenging dog.The Border Terrier is fiercely intelligent and loyal, but they come with a high list of demands, that (quite honestly) not every owner is up for.Your Terrier is happiest when it has a “job” to keep its mind engaged, or just a routine it can follow. And a happy Terrier means your companion will feel no need to destroy your home.

8. Biewer Terrier

The Biewer is an affection and tiny bundle of joy that loves to spend time with family and friends.So it’s not surprising that these dogs will fit perfectly into just about any home. Have children or other pets? No problem, the more the merrier.Biewer’s love to show off their silly side throughout the day, and have no shortage of playfulness. Their main goal in life is to make you laugh.

9. Brussels Griffon

Just like Chewbacca, this breed is loyal, intelligent, and sometimes moody.The Griffon is of the needy sort, and may demand your love and attention throughout the day. They prefer to spend most of their time with you, which doesn’t leave much room for others.In fact, the Griffon is quite suspicious of strangers, and definitely not warm towards children.The Brussels Griffon can be a challenging dog, but will reward you with endless love and attention for your efforts.

10. Cairn Terrier

That’s right, it’s Toto from The Wizard of Oz.These dogs, like Toto, are brave, intelligent, and ready to follow you on adventures (or at least your daily chores).They absolutely love being your companion, and flourish with love and attention.The Cairn Terrier has plenty of energy to burn, and, despite being small, they are very active and need to run everyday. Without proper daily exercise, the Cairn Terrier will get bored and resort to digging, barking, and chewing.

11. Chinese Crested

Looking for something a little different? The Chinese Crested might be the answer. They are tiny, thin, and make an exotic fashion statement – which is being mostly naked. Not all of them are hairless though. In fact, some have full coats of thin white hair.Chinese Crested dogs are picky, and prefer the company of their owner over strangers or children. However, they have nothing but love for their owners and family.Not surprisingly, they don’t fair well in the cold and prefer hot climates and warm blankets.

12. Coton De Tulear

Often referred to as the Velcro dog, the Coton wants nothing more than to be stuck to your side.This dog is similar to its relatives, the Bichon Frise and Maltese, but is a little more down to earth.They’d rather cuddle up on the couch with you than spend their day with excessive running. That doesn’t mean exercise is off the table, however. The Coton needs daily walks and play time with their owner.Their adaptability is what makes the Coton such an amazing companion.

13. Dandie Dinmont Terrier

Dandie’s are a very unique and rare breed, with a large head and eyes (somewhat too large for their small body), but are built very low to the ground.These unique characters are fun loving, intelligent, and gentle, but can be extremely challenging when it comes to training.Combined these characteristics create an unusual looking dog.

14. Havanese

With the biggest heart of all: the Havanese has only one thing on its mind, and that’s you.But with all that attachment, the Havanese do not like being left alone, and will usually resort to howling sad songs while you’re gone.Early socialization is important to avoid your dog from being overly timid. And while training these dogs may be a slow process, it is necessary to curb excessive barking and other bad habits.They are very adaptable to your lifestyle and are content going on daily walks, or even going full tilt with agility or obedience classes.

15. Lhasa Apso

The Lhasa Apso is descended from royalty (no, really), and they are still very aware of their status.They are a proud, independent dog, now assuming the position of protecting their family.Because of their past watch dog traits, the Lhasa Apso can be aggressive toward strangers. While they have a fierce side, they can be very loyal and loving toward their family.

16. Maltese

Energetic and elegant, the perfect way to describe the Maltese.A princess (or prince) that prefers the finer things in life, and that often includes running, playing, and spending time with loved ones.The Maltese become very attached to their owners, and they don’t like being left alone or else they may resort to barking and destructive behavior.Maltese are incredibly intelligent but also impatient, so children and other dogs may annoy this breed. They may feel the need to protect their owners, which can lead to barking or biting.

17. Miniature Schnauzer

Unlimited energy and the world’s biggest heart, that’s what you get with a Schnauzer. Their enthusiasm and affection knows no bounds, and you can expect this guy to be bouncing off the wall with them.Schnauzers love to be the center of attention; they’ll put on a show for you and your friends and are amazing comedians.This makes them a wonderful companion – if you can accommodate their energetic lifestyle.They are at the top of their class and, in a calm environment, can learn very quickly. Mental stimulation is just as important at physical for the Schnauzer, and they crave learning and exploring.

18. Scottish Terrier

Too smart for their own good, and they come with a little extra sass.Scottish Terriers are independent and live by their own set of rules. They’re strong-headed, so training isn’t on their list of priorities.But despite all that tough-guy exterior, they have a soft spot for their family on the interior. Terriers love every second spent with their family, showing their deeply affectionate side when at home.Scottish Terriers favorite pastime is digging, because they were originally bred for hunting foxes and badgers.To deter digging and boredom, they need time to go on daily walks and explore the world beyond the backyard.

19. Shih Tzu

Always the center of attention, and they’ll do everything they can think of to make you smile.The Shih Tzu is playful, lovable, and wants nothing more than to be part of the family. Friendliness is in their genetics, that’s because Shih Tzu’s were bred for companionship.So you won’t find any hunting or herding traits here.Their good natured attitude makes them very compatible for just about anything; kids, families, and other dogs are not a problem – the more the merrier.Shih Tzu’s can be quite energetic, and they love playtime and exploring to let off some of that excess energy. Here’s another little secret: the only thing better than one Shih Tzu is TWO Shih Tzus! That’s because these dogs will flourish with a friend with whom they can play and learn.

20. Toy Poodle

Poodles are at the top of their class, being ranked as one of the most intelligent breeds. They are eager to please their owners, and with all those brains, it makes them very keen to training.You might imagine a poodle as being elegant, gentle creatures (and they most certainly can be), but what you might not expect is for poodles to be incredible athletes.Poodles live for learning and training, so they need daily exercise, or they might result to destructive behavior. They tend to grow calmer as they mature, but still need ways to stimulate their body and mind.Poodles can be a groomers dream dog, their soft frizzy hair makes them perfect for styling and trying out the latest trends. However, their coat needs constant maintenance, in which case you may want to groom your Poodle from home.

21. West Highland White Terrier

A sometimes overly confident trouble-maker, the West Highland Terrier (or “Westie” for short) is a lovable handful but perfect for the right owners.This little lady knows exactly what she’s doing when she digs or barks, but it’s all in good fun.Because of all that energy they needs daily playtime and exercise to keep her from getting into bad behavior. They also need friends, and will flourish with other dogs or a full-time playful companion.With all that stubbornness the Westie can be difficult to train, but they are a very sensitive soul and do not respond well to scolding.Still, the Westie is considered one of the most loyal dog breeds.

22. Yorkshire Terrier

“Yorkies” are the star of their own show, and they want to make sure everyone is watching.They have a lot of personality to show off, and it certainly comes with some sass. These dogs were originally bred to hunt rodents, and these traits are still very apparent as their prey drive is off the charts.These are lovable little lap-dogs that love to play and explore, and are perfect for singles.

Medium Sized Non Shedding Dogs

23. Barbet

Sometimes mistaken for a Labradoodle, the Barbet certainly share some similar characteristics.From their playful attitude, to their curly coat, it’s easy to compare the two breeds. However, the Barbet is a rare breed, and you may be hard pressed to find one in your area.Friendly, social, playful, intelligent and silly are the best ways to describe a Barbet.Their friendliness combined with intellect means they absolutely excel in training and agility. Their aim is to please their owners.But all that silliness needs an outlet, or you’ll find yourself with a bored and destructive dog. These are very active dogs and need daily exercise and mental stimulation.

24. Irish Terrier

The Irish Terrier is fearless and alert, always on the lookout for intruders. They were born for guard duty, and they take their job seriously, which makes them excellent watch dogs. They are also pure athletes with incredible speed and energy, so they excel at agility courses.But with that tough-guy attitude comes a big heart, because all they really want to do is protect the ones they love. They are amazing companions, and great with children. However, they don’t generally do well with other dogs, unless raised with them as a puppy.

25. Kerry Blue Terrier

The Kerry Blue Terrier is a strong-headed working breed, and were originally bred for herding and guarding.They have a very distinct-looking coat, which is grey with just a slight tint of blue, along with a magnificent beard and mustache.Working and guarding are just in the Terrier traits, so this dog makes an excellent watch dog, but also a loving companion.They’re gentle and kind towards their human family, but are not always friendly towards other dogs. In fact, many animals will peak their high prey drive, so early socialization and training are essential.As a working breed, the Blue Terrier needs a lot of daily exercise, and they absolutely love having a routine or a “job”.

26. Lagotto Romagnolo

Often compared to as a smaller version of a Water Spaniel, these dogs carry very similar traits.Lagotto Romagnolos are a working breed. always active and ready to save the day, and their true calling is the water.This breed was originally used as a water retrieval dog dating back over 200 years ago! But they never lost those traits, they have a strong desire to work, retrieve, and please their owners.With a strong desire to work all day long, these a very high energy dogs that love having a job. A bored Lagotto is a very destructive one, and usually leads to digging or barking.

27. Lakeland Terrier

Originally bred to hunt foxes and protect livestock, the Lakeland Terrier is there to watch and defend what’s most important.As a hunting dog, they’re quick and agile, and have intense bursts of energy to help them give chase.With all that speed and agility, they can run away extremely fast, and can easily clear most fences. It’s recommended you run them on-leash, or in a securely enclosed area.

28. Schnauzer

Big hearts and unlimited energy, that’s just the Schnauzer way.Just like their close relatives, the Miniature Schnauzer and Giant Schnauzer, this is a standard-sized version with very similar qualities.Schnauzers are gentle, affectionate, and their aim is to make you smile. This makes them a wonderful companion – if you can accommodate their energetic lifestyle.These dogs are highly intelligent, and they are fully aware of just how smart they are, so they can be a very clever and mischievous breed.They love to please their owners and are very receptive to training, which is why they are a common sight in agility and hunting.

29. Tibetan Terrier

Although it’s called a Terrier, they have no relation. They do, however, originate from Tibet, so at least they got that part right.The Tibetan name for this dog is the Tsang Apso, which loosely translates to “shaggy dog”, which is fitting for its distinct thick long coat.These beautiful beasts were bred for herding and working, and they love the outdoors.Thousands of years ago, Tibetan Terriers were working dogs known as the “Holy Dogs of Tibet” and were highly valued and considered to bring good fortune. Mistreating their companions in ancient Tibet was believed to bring bad luck to the entire village.

30. Wheaten Terrier

The Wheaten Terrier is always on the lookout for fun; they love to run and play at a moment’s notice.While they need a lot of daily activity, they’re also content for some daytime naps and cuddling.That makes the Wheaten a great companion no matter where you live. They’re just happy to be with you and your family.However, they do carry some of the typical Terrier traits: digging, chasing, and barking are common when bored.Despite their bad habits, they are very bright and quick learners. That doesn’t always mean they’ll follow your commands, and can be very stubborn at times. Your Wheaten responds best to positive and patient training, rather than scolding.

Large Non Shedding Dogs

31. Afghan Hound

Exotic and beautiful, the Afghan hound is exactly the high maintenance diva you would expect them to be.They are incredibly intelligent and independent creatures, carrying an almost mysterious personality.But their indifference results in difficult training, and they will often just ignore commandsAfghan’s were once used for hunting, and still carry their high prey drive to this day.You can expect the Afghan to give chase or hunt small critters or even other neighborhood pets at a moments notice.Combined with their independent nature, they will often go running off (at very high speeds) with no hope of you catching them.While sometimes affectionate with their family, it’s not on their list of priorities. However, these dogs are especially sensitive to any kind of scolding, and require very gentle and patient owners.

32. Airdale Terrier

Similar to its Terrier relatives, the Airdale was bred for working and hunting, but built to be more agile and better at swimming.They are the largest of all terrier breeds, often averaging at 45 to 65 pounds and as tall as 2 feet.Another shared trait is their seemingly unlimited energy; so these dogs need an outlet or else they’ll resort to destructive behavior. The Airdale flourishes when given a job or an active daily routine they can follow.Airdales are very intelligent, and combined with all that energy, they excel at agility and hunting. However, some are strong-headed and independent, so they may understand your commands but may just choose not to follow them. Therefore, they aren’t recommended for novice owners.

33. Bouvier Des Flandres

Powerful and fearless, the Bouvier is a true athlete among dogs.They were originally bred for herding and working on farms. They are big and powerful, sometimes weighing up to 100 pounds, yet they can haul that weight around no problem with their fast legs. Daily exercise is absolutely necessary to keep this big guy content.Of course, with that big stature comes confidence and a lion’s pride. They are truly brave dogs and are ready to defend the “pack” as necessary.Owners will need to demonstrate assertive leadership in order to maintain who’s really in charge.Despite their “tough-guy” attitude, they are truly gentle and affectionate creatures with their loved ones and are great with children, but wary of strangers and other dogs.

34. Giant Schnauzer

As you may have guessed, this is similar to a Miniature or Standard Schnauzer, but just 60 to 80 pounds heavier.And with all that energy and playfulness, you’ve got your work cut out for you.The Giant Schnauzer was bred to herd and guard, but also to be an intelligent companion. They are a working breed, and as such, they need a job or daily activities to keep them content.Like all Schnauzers, they have a big heart, and want to share that affection with their owners all day. They are experts at making you smile, and love nothing more than playing and exploring. They are also keen to please and are very receptive to training.However, they will take the lead role in the house if they feel their owner isn’t doing a good enough job. Assertive yet patient leadership is what this breed craves. Therefore, this isn’t for the novice owner.

35. Irish Water Spaniel

The Irish Water Spaniel was bred to specialize in (you guessed it) water. More specifically, hunting and retrieving birds over bodies of water.While swimming is its specialty, so is pleasing its owners – which makes them wonderful companions.Water Spaniels are the class-clown; their boundless energy and playfulness make them absolutely hilarious dogs that love attention. But once they settle down, they are ready to learn and are highly receptive to training. They can truly be your new best friend.

36. Komondor

Instantly recognizable for it’s “dreads”, the Komondor looks more like a giant mop with a tongue.The exotic looking coat develops into ‘cords’ as they mature and needs a lot of work to maintain. You’ll be grooming, bathing, and brushing this coat out very often because, just like a mop, it collects dirt very quickly. These dogs are calm and gentle leaders, showing deep love for their family. They have short bursts of energy and play, but still enjoy daytime naps and love being the fearless hero for your home.Komondors are fiercely loyal to their family, going as far as becoming territorial towards those they don’t trust. Despite that heavy coat, they move quickly and intently, and they come equipped with a powerful bark to scare off intruders. This loyalty can lead to aggression, and the Komondor is not a dog to back down from a fight.Although not dog-friendly, they are great protectors of livestock and are most often found guarding farms.Their temperament makes them difficulty for the average owner and comes with a long list of challenges and responsibilities.

37. Labradoodle *

*This breed comes with a big red asterisk, so let’s get that out of the way!Not all Labradoodles are hypoallergenic, and some shed more than others.It hinges on genetics and pedigree. Poodles have minimal shedding, but Labradors shed quite a bit. So, by mixing the two, you’ll get varying results.See: Are Labradoodles Hypoallergenic – for full details.If you want a hypoallergenic Labradoodle with minimal shedding, then you’ll need one from a 3rd generation litter. Meaning both parents, and both grandparents, must also be non-shedding and hypoallergenic. This is done through careful breeding. You will need to locate breeders in your area and do some research.*So, why go through all the trouble? Labradoodles are amazing dogs! You get the intelligence and trainability of the Poodle, but the lovable and playful temperament of a Labrador.Their energy and enthusiasm knows no bounds, and they’ll often want to be the center of attention. You are their entire world, so its their job to keep you laughing and playing. With their brilliant mind and eagerness to please, Labradoodles are fairly easy to train (once they’ve calmed down).

38. Portuguese Water Dog

It’s all in the name – these dogs were literally born for Water.Originally bred in Portugal and trained to herd fish, retrieve lost gear and fishing nets, and even swim from boat-to-boat to deliver messages.These are loyal companions with a mission, and they still have that sharp focus today.They are athletic, intelligent, friendly, and clever. Porties are wonderful companions that love people and other pets, but more than anything they love being in the water.Because this is a working breed they have an absolute ton of energy, and require strenuous daily activity, or else they may become bored and destructive.There is still no hard evidence that this dog is completely hypoallergenic or shed-free, and it seems to vary between different litters. So be sure to check if you have an allergic reaction before adopting.

39. Saluki

One of the oldest breeds known to man, the Saluki is believed to have existed over 6,000 years ago.These dogs are depicted in ancient scriptures, pottery, and even Egyptian tombs. Their beautiful and exotic looking features attest to their ancient history.The Saluki are shy and content to just be in your presence, but not keen on showing too much affection. They often need time to warm up to you.They are calm and gentle, and prefer a comfortable lifestyle that includes warm blankets.Although they are very intelligent, training just isn’t on their agenda.

40. Standard Poodle

Elegant, athletic, hardy, and clever. These are a few of the Standard Poodle’s best qualities.And, you’ve probably already heard, they are at the top of their class with incredible intelligence.Training a Poodle is an absolute joy, they are receptive and keen to please their owners, which is why they excel at agility and obedience courses.Despite looking a little “dainty”, these are hearty animals that love a little rough play and long runs.With their intelligence and energy combined, they can become bored and resort to finding trouble as an outlet. So, a daily routine of exercise and mental stimulation is what will keep your Poodle out of trouble.I’m sure you’ve seen the elaborate poodle hair cuts. But even if that’s not your thing, Poodles need extensive grooming to keep them healthy. Expect to visit a professional groomer at least every 4 to 6 weeks, along with daily brushing (see our recommended poodle brushes.)

About Non Shedding Dogs

They All Shed!

You heard that right: there is no such thing as a dog that does not shed.But, some breeds shed a lot less, to the point where they appear to not shed at all. That’s what we have listed here.You’re not completely off the hook though. Even non shedding breeds require regular maintenance. Just like human hair, your dog needs to be brushed, bathed, and have routine haircuts.We also recommend you check out these 4 Common Myths about Non Shedding Dogs.

Dealing with Allergies

When we think of allergies with pets, we naturally assume it’s the hair causing it. But in fact, it’s pet dander.Dander is dead skin particles that naturally flake off and become airborne. Some dogs produce minimal dander, and we call those hypoallergenic breeds.No dog is 100% hypoallergenic, as they will always produce some level of pet dander. However, most allergy sufferers will be able to tolerate a dog with minimal dander much better.Dander can be significantly reduced by regular bathing. Even hypoallergenic breeds can cause allergic reactions if they are not bathed and groomed regularly, due to the buildup of allergen-related proteins on the skin.Important Note: Allergic reactions may be triggered by saliva or urine as well.

Are there non-shedding dogs?

Before we jump into which dog breeds are the best fit for pet owners looking for a non-shedding pet, we first need to talk about whether non-shedding dogs exist.And the answer is—not exactly.The idea that there’s a dog that doesn’t shed at all is a myth. There’s no dog breed that is completely non-shedding; all dogs shed to some degree. But there are low-shedding dogs that keep shedding to a minimum—and, in fact, shed so little, you probably won’t even notice.So, what are some of these low-shedding dog breeds to add to your family?

Low-shedding dog breeds

Let’s take a look at some of the most popular dogs for potential pet owners looking for a low-shedding companion. We’ve organized this list of low-shedding dog breeds by size: small dogs, medium dogs, and large dogs.

Small dogs

Basenji

With its small size, the Basenji is one of the smallest of the hound family—and thanks to its short coat, it’s also one of the least likely the shed.The Basenji is known for being a smart, independent dog. They’re also highly active, so before you add a Basenji to your family, make sure you have the energy to keep up!As far as grooming goes, Basenjis are extremely low maintenance. They’re known for being excellent self-groomers, and their short, fine hair needs nothing more than the occasional bath to stay in tip-top shape.

Bedlington terrier

Known for their short, curly coat and their fun-loving personalities, Bedlington terriers are a great low-shedding breed. Just be prepared to take them on plenty of daily walks. Because they were bred to be racing dogs, Bedlington terriers are high energy and need plenty of exercise (but once they get out their energy, they’ll be happy to snuggle up with you on the couch). As long as they get their exercise, Bedlington terriers make for relaxed, calm house dogs.Even though Bedlington terriers are known as a no-shed breed, there’s a lot to keep up with in terms of grooming and maintenance. Bedlington terriers should be brushed every few days and groomed and trimmed every month to avoid mats, tangles, and other coat issues.

Bichon Frise

Looking for a sweet, playful, and almost unmanageably cute shed-free addition to your family? Look no further than the Bichon Frise.Thanks to their soft, curly hair, Bichon Frises somewhat resemble cotton balls—but just because their hair is big doesn’t mean it will get everywhere. These hypoallergenic lap dogs won’t shed much—as long as you keep up with their grooming. Bichon Frises need to be kept on a strict grooming schedule (including daily brushing and a monthly bath and trim) in order to keep their coat in top shape.Check out the Top 4 Bichon Frise Haircut Styles.

Brussels Griffon

Brussels Griffon enthusiasts love the breed thanks to their cheerful disposition, their curious personality, and their expressive face. They’re also an active breed (despite their small size!), making them a favorite for families who want a small dog who still enjoys walking, playing, and exploring the outdoors. And as an added bonus? The Brussels Griffon barely sheds.Named after the city of Brussels, Belgium, these short, sturdy dogs have short hair that requires minimal grooming; weekly brushing and the occasional bath and trim is all that’s necessary to keep the Brussels Griffon properly groomed.

Cairn terrier

One of the oldest of the terrier breeds, the Cairn terrier has a double coat that gives the dog a shaggy appearance. But despite the shaggy look, this little dog’s hair isn’t likely to shed much. When it comes to grooming and maintenance, the Cairn terrier falls somewhere in the middle of the pack; weekly brushing, monthly baths, and the occasional hand-stripping will help maintain the coat’s health and texture.

Chinese Crested

The Chinese Crested dog might look a bit unusual—but their loving, sweet, and affectionate personalities make them the perfect companion dog. Plus, thanks to their mostly hairless body, they’re a great option for households looking to avoid shedding issues.The Chinese Crested dog does have some hair on their head (which can resemble pigtails), ankles, and tail—but they don’t shed much. But just because they don’t have much hair doesn’t mean they don’t require any grooming! Because the Chinese Crested dog is mostly bald, they’re prone to skin irritation (including sunburn!)—which makes skin care (including targeted treatments and sunscreen) this breed’s top grooming concern.

Coton de Tulear

This “Royal Dog of Madagascar” might have a regal-sounding name, but there’s nothing overly fancy about their personality; in fact, their temperament is closer to the jester than the king! The Coton de Tulear is a sweet, playful, happy-go-lucky dog who wants nothing more than to joke, play, and entertain.The Coton de Tulear gets its name thanks to its cotton-like coat—but that cotton-like coat will stay on the dog’s body, not on your furniture. The main grooming issue with the Coton de Tulear is regular brushing; the longer the dog’s coat, the more often it will need to be brushed to avoid mats.

Havanese

The Havanese has one of the cutest faces in the canine kingdom. But that’s just one of their charms! These dogs are known for their vibrant, upbeat personalities. Thanks to their small size and relatively low activity needs, they’re also a heavy favorite among city and apartment dwellers.The Havanese has a long, thick coat—and at first glance, you might think they’d be likely to shed. But with regular grooming, Havanese dogs are actually very low-shedding. But by regular, we mean regular—in order to keep the Havanese’s coat healthy and matte-free, plan for daily brushing sessions along with the occasional bath and haircut (depending on the length of the coat, every few months should be fine).Check out the Top 5 Havanese Haircut Styles.

Lhasa Apso

The Lhasa Apso might look like a lap dog—but don’t let their small stature fool you! These dogs were originally bred to alert Tibetan monks of approaching visitors to the monastery, making them excellent guard dogs. They can be suspicious of strangers, but this breed is fiercely loyal to their humans—and they also have a fun, playful side that makes them a great companion dog.Lhasa Apso’s have one of the most luxurious coats in the animal kingdom, which can grow to the ground without regular trims. But even though their hair grows long, it doesn’t shed—just prepare yourself for a regular grooming schedule to keep their coat intact. Lhasa Apso’s need regular brushing (every day if the coat is long, every two to three days if the coat is kept shorter) along with monthly baths and trims.

Maltese

Maltese dogs are sweet, loving, and high-energy. They might be small, but they compensate for it with their big energy and personality!The Maltese also has a distinctive white coat that is low-shedding—but not low maintenance. Be prepared for daily brushing and regular baths to keep their coat its healthiest.Check out the Top Maltese Haircut Styles.

Miniature Schnauzer

Miniature Schnauzers look a bit like little old men. But they certainly don’t act like it! This breed is known for their active personality; they’re playful, energetic, and love to run around!Schnauzers are known for their long facial hair, which resembles a mustache—and just like human mustaches don’t shed, neither does Miniature Schnauzer hair. Their double coat needs regular brushing, but if the coat is kept short, the Miniature Schnauzer needs minimal grooming.

Scottish terrier

Looking for a confident, independent, all-around spunky dog? And are looking for that dog to also not shed? If so, look not further than the Scottish terrier.Similar to the Miniature Schnauzer, Scottish terriers have long hair around the face (and elsewhere on the body), but won’t shed with regular brushing (about once a week should be plenty). While a Scottish terrier’s coat will look its best when hand-stripped, a bi-monthly trip to the groomer will also suffice.Shih TzuShih Tzus are sweet, loyal, affectionate, and lovable. They’re the definition of a lap dog! And with a soft, curly coat they’re also the definition of low-shedding.The longer the Shih Tzu’s coat, the more brushing it will take to maintain it (Shih Tzus with long coats will need daily brushing, while the shorter “puppy cut” will need to be brushed every two to three days). Shih Tzus should also be bathed every three to four weeks to keep the coat clean, healthy, and shiny.Check out the Top 5 Shih Tzu Haircut Styles.

Yorkshire terrier

Yorkshire terriers may be small—but they’re definitely not small in personality! These pups are known for being scrappy, affectionate, and all-around feisty (in a lovable way!)—so if you’re looking for a pup that packs a large personality in a small package, this is your dog.More commonly known as a Yorkie, Yorkshire terriers are little dogs with a thin coat that can easily grow to the floor with regular grooming. But while their coat is long, that coat isn’t going anywhere—this breed is extremely low-shedding. The Yorkie coat is actually a lot like human hair—and just like you need to regularly brush and wash your hair, expect to regularly brush and groom your Yorkie’s coat, too.Check out the Top 5 Yorkie Haircut Styles.

Medium dogs

Kerry Blue terrier

The Kerry Blue terrier is smart, sharp, and athletic. And it definitely has the high-energy terrier personality! But let’s be real—what most people think of when they think of this breed? Their coat.The Kerry Blue terrier is famous for its gorgeous blue coat. But while the coat’s color might get the most attention, the fact that it’s so low-shedding is another reason to take notice of this breed. And not only are they low-shedding, but they’re also low maintenance! All you need to do to keep the Kerry Blue terrier’s coat in top shape is brush them on a weekly basis and get them groomed every six to eight weeks.

Lagotto Romagnolo

Want a dog that’s just the perfect balance of strong and lovable? Athletic and sweet? Good-natured and hard-working? Then look no further than the Lagotto Romagnolo.Known as the “truffle dog” of Italy (thanks to its history hunting the pricey mushroom) this sweet, adorable, curly-haired breed makes a great family dog—especially when you consider how little they shed. The Lagotta Romagnolo’s curly coat more closely resembles human hair than dog fur—and needs to be treated accordingly with regular brushings (once per week), baths, and trims.

Portuguese water dog

Looking for a dog that’s keen to go on adventures—but just as keen to snuggle with you on the couch? The Portuguese water dog is the perfect mix of lovable, adventurous, and affectionate.There were probably a number of reasons that former President Barack Obama chose the Portuguese water dog as the best breed for the First Family—and we’re sure the fact that this friendly breed barely sheds was probably high on the list. Just make sure to brush the Portuguese water dog every week; otherwise, their coat can get matted.

Terrier breeds

Terriers are fun, active, and extremely high energy. If you’re always on the go, a terrier would make a great companion to your adventures—and you don’t have to worry about them getting their fur everywhere.In general, the Terrier breeds are unlikely to shed much—so if you find a terrier mix, you shouldn’t have to worry about any shedding issues. Weekly brushings and the occasional bath should be plenty to keep your terrier’s coat in tip-top shape.

Tibetan terrier

Looking for a watchdog? The Tibetan terrier is alert, intelligent, and extremely loyal—making them the perfect pet to watch over your family.Despite its name, the Tibetan terrier isn’t actually a terrier; it’s more closely related to the Lhasa Apso (although larger) and has a similar long, low-shedding coat. And just like the Lhasa Apso needs to be brushed every few days and bathed and groomed every month or so, you should plan to do the same for the Tibetan Terrier.

Wheaton terrier

In you’re looking for a loyal, loving companion dog, you won’t find many breeds better than the Wheaton terrier. These pups are known for their friendly personalities and deep-seated loyalty to their humans. They’re also known for how little they shed!The soft-coated Wheaton terrier has an extremely soft coat (hence the name) that’s unlikely to leave tufts of fur strewn around your home—but their coat does require regular grooming and regular brushing to keep matting at bay.

Large dogs

Afghan hound

With their slender faces and long, silky coat, The Afghan hound is one of the most distinctive and easily recognizable dog breeds in the world. But these dogs are more than just their looks! They have a distinct personality that interestingly blends a sense of both silliness and aloofness—and they also happen to be extremely low-shedding.They might not shed much, but Afghan hounds have a robust coat—and that coat requires hours of brushing every week (plus regular baths) in order to stay healthy, clean, and mat-free. If you decide to add an Afghan hound to your family, just be prepared for a whole lot of grooming.

Bouvier Des Flandres

The Bouvier Des Flandres is a strong, sturdy working dog. They make amazing watchdogs or guard dogs—but they’re loving hearts also make them great companion dogs.The thick coat of the Bouvier Des Flandres has evolved to withstand the elements (the dog was originally bred as a jack-of-all-trades farm dog)—and in addition to being virtually weatherproof, the coat doesn’t shed, either. It’s also versatile and low maintenance; a weekly brushing and occasional bath are all you need to do for this breed to keep them well-groomed.

Giant Schnauzers

Just like the Miniature Schnauzer, Giant Schauzers are intelligent, alert, and have bold, energetic personalities. And just like their miniature counterparts, Giant Schnauzers won’t shed (much) from their mustache, face, or anywhere else on their body. Just make sure to brush their coat regularly to avoid tangles and matting.

Irish water spaniel

Love to swim? True to their name, the Irish water spaniel is one of the best swimmers in the canine world. They also happen to be curious, courageous, energetic, and playful—making them a great pet for an active family.The Irish water spaniel is known for its long, curly coat—but even though it’s long and thick, the hair of these spaniels doesn’t shed much.

Labradoodle

Labrador retrievers are one of the most friendly and loving breeds in the animal kingdom—but they definitely shed. Labradoodles (which are a cross between Labs and Poodles) offer the best of both worlds—the wonderful personality of a Lab with the hypoallergenic coat of a Poodle (which is very low-shedding).Just like a poodle, you should plan to brush your Labradoodle every day to avoid mats—and regular baths (every month or so) will keep their coat clean and healthy. Note that because they’re a mix of breeds, some Labradoodles may shed more than others. Work with a responsible breeder who can tell you about the particular puppy’s background.Check out the Top Labradoodle Haircut Styles.

Poodle

You might think Poodles are adorable—but their personality is much more dignified than cute. These proud animals are extremely smart, active, and athletic.Poodles have a lot of thick, curly hair—but their coat is hypoallergenic and sheds very little. Poodles need to be brushed every day, especially near the skin, to keep hair from getting matted and tangled.Check out the Top Poodle Haircut Styles.

Low-shedding dog breeds and allergies

A lot of people look for non-shedding (or, in reality, low-shedding) dogs in order to keep allergic reactions to a minimum. But while low-shedding dogs can be a great fit for dog allergy sufferers, it’s important to know where the allergic reactions are actually coming from—and how to avoid them.So first things first: dog hair doesn’t cause allergic reactions. Reactions happen when pet dander (dead skin cells) flake off the dog’s skin and get into the air. So, if you want to keep allergic reactions to a minimum,While no dog is 100% hypoallergenic, there are dogs with a hypoallergenic coat that produce much less dander than others, which can keep reactions at bay. Getting a low-shedding dog can also help; dander can travel in dog hair, so if a dog doesn’t shed much, there is less dander that’s likely to get into the air. And regular baths, and regular grooming – check out the best grooming tools here – (whether you have a hypoallergenic dog or not) are a must!

Wrapping things up

Being a dog owner doesn’t mean you have to put up with dog hair covering every square inch of your home. And now that you know the most popular low-shedding breeds, you can have the best of both worlds—great dog, no dog hair.