Male vs Female Cats?

For new cat parents, there are many choices to make before bringing your new feline friend into your home, one of which is deciding whether to get a male or female cat. Both male and female cats make great companions, but there can be some differences between the two. Many cat parents may develop a preference for one or the other. In this article we will explore the differences between male and female cats to help new cat parents make an informed decision about which one they might prefer.

It is typically recommended that cats be spayed or neutered before they are 5 months of age to prevent problem behaviors . Also, unneutered male cats typically develop big cheeks due to testosterone causing a larger, rounder face than females.

This may result in repeat trips to the veterinarian and the need to feed a special urinary diet to reduce the development of urine crystals. Male cats have also been reported to spend more time roaming the house than females (Bernsterin & Friedmann, 2013). On the other hand, some owners have reported more conflicts between male cats, especially if they were not neutered before sexual maturity and were picked up as outdoor strays.

One of the main behavioral differences between female and male cats is their tendency to urine mark outside of the litter box. Even if you do the introductions correctly, there is no guarantee that your cats will enjoy each others company and become friends rather than just tolerating each other.

Are male or female cats more loving?

For example, male cats may become more aggressive, spray urine and try to escape the house when they are in their sexually mature stage. However, female cats usually become more loving, and some tend to rub against almost everything while also being very vocal.

Is it better to have a female or male cat?

Males, or toms, can be friendlier than females. … Female cats tend to be more reserved than males but are far less likely to spray. Females tend to howl when they go into heat and can become pregnant before their first year – talk to your vet about getting your female spayed.

Which cats are more cuddly male or female?

Male cats tend to be more social and affectionate with both humans and other cats. They commonly form strong bonds with other cats in the home, even when they are not from the same litter. Females, on the other hand, are often more standoffish. If you are looking for a cuddle bug, adopting a male may be your best bet.

What's the difference between a male and female cat?

The most obvious physical difference between male and female cats is their genitalia. Neutered males have their testicles removed and spayed females have their uterus removed. … Male cats are typically larger than females, especially if they were not neutered until after sexual maturity.

Before bringing a new cat into your home, there are several things to consider, including whether you should adopt a male cat or a female cat. As veterinarians, weve cared for countless cats over the years, and weve come to notice some interesting differences between males and females. The biological differences are apparent, but you may wonder if any more subtle differences would make one sex a better fit for your family than the other. Of course, each cat is different, and whats true for one might not be for another. Still, you should be aware of a few typical personality and behavioral differences when looking for the perfect furry friend to add to your family.

If you put in long hours at work and your new pet will spend a lot of time home alone, a female will generally handle this better than a male. As noted above, spaying and neutering play a massive role in determining the personalities and behaviors of cats.

No matter which sex you adopt, we strongly recommend altering them so problematic behavior wont hide the best parts of their personality. If you want a furry friend who will play with your kids and spend hours snuggled up by your side, adopting a male kitten might be your best bet. If, however, you work long hours and your feline friend will be spending a lot of time alone, consider bringing home a female.

The key is to select a cat or kitten that will adapt well to your environment. Take into account whether you are single, have a family with children, a multi-cat household, or a house with both cats and other animals. Cats are well known for having personalities. Aside from temperament, there are also differences in size, body types, and hair lengths that should be factors in your decision. Researching breeds and learning about gender differences can help you make your choice.

If you are adopting a cat from a shelter, ask about temperament and activity level so that you will have a great match for your household. Intact male cats “spray” to mark their territory and howl for females (this is usually not a problem if you get him neutered).

By this time, they will be weaned, will have been taught some useful skills by their mother (not the least of which is how to use the litter box), and have had some good socialization.

Our parents never said no, so my brother and I just kept dragging those cats and kittens back home with us from our grandparents farm, from outdoor flea markets and occasionally from some family friends who just happened to have a spare kitten.

But Christy lost a front paw after being hit by a car, and spaying her seemed like the right thing to do, especially since shed already gone through one miserable heat. Whats more, she is seasonally polyestrous and cycles in and out of heat during a good portion of the year starting in January or February and continuing into the fall.

In warmer regions, the cycle starts in late December and ends sometime after the summer solstice. Its no wonder that Bastet , the cat-headed goddess of ancient Egypt, was associated with maternity. Chrissie Klinger, writing for Hills Pet Nutrition, 1 explains this by saying, Behavioral differences between male and female cats are most obvious in pets that are not neutered or spayed, since the behavioral differences usually are related to the cats sex drive.

I came across an online discussion recently (not very scientific, I know) where the commenters frequently described female cats as bossier and more independent. On the other hand, Wendy Ratza says she always had female cats growing up because we worried about males that sprayed , and we didnt want to deal with that. Ratza says Leos affectionate personality totally changed the way she thought of male cats.

There is no ultimate answer to the question of whether male cats are better pets than female ones and vice versa, says Emily Parker, writing for Catalogical. Whether your cat is affectionate, loyal, aggressive, territorial, playful or cooped up, its a matter of personality and not gender, she says. Differences Between Male and Female Cats. Hills Pet Nutrition, Inc. https://www.hillspet.com/cat-care/behavior-appearance/differences-between-male-and-femalecats .

Hart, BL, Cooper L. Factors relating to urine spraying and fighting in prepubertally gonadectomized cats. Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association .

Which Combination Of Genders Get Along Better?

If you are thinking of having more than one cat, you may have people telling you that certain combinations are better than others. Specifically, there is anecdotal evidence that malefemale combinations are better than malemale or femalefemale. However, a study by Barry and Crowell-Davis (1999) found few differences in positive or negative social behaviors in houses that had only male cats, only female cats, or a combination of male and female cats. Male cats were more likely to spend time in the same room as each other, and female cats were never reported to groom other cats, but no other differences were reportedIf you want to have multiple cats in your household, it is easiest to adopt littermates. Introducing unfamiliar cats is a long, difficult process because cats are territorial. Even if you do the introductions correctly, there is no guarantee that your cats will enjoy each other’s company and become friends rather than just tolerating each other. Adopting littermates ensures that you will have two cats that get along and enjoy each other’s company. Adopting littermates helps contribute to proper socialization as the cats learn proper cat behavior from each other as well. They are also able to entertain and play with each other rather than attacking your feet when they are bored. Even if you do not want kittens, finding older littermates that are up for adoption or looking for ‘bonded buddies’ in the shelter is a better bet than adopting two unfamiliar cats.

A Note About Neutering and Spaying

Before we dive into the differences, it’s important to note that many personality traits and behaviors are most noticeable in unaltered pets. Intact males are more likely to spray urine in and around your home. They’re also more prone to aggression and escape attempts to go in search of female cats. Intact females tend to vocalize loudly to attract males.

Male Cats Are More Social and Playful

If your cat has been neutered or spayed (which we strongly recommend!), they are not as prone to these problematic behaviors. With that being said, let’s look at some specific personality differences in spayed and neutered cats.

Female Cats Are More Independent

Female cats tend to be more independent than males. If you put in long hours at work and your new pet will spend a lot of time home alone, a female will generally handle this better than a male. Girl cats are often perfectly content snoozing and entertaining themselves throughout the day.Even after spaying, the maternal instinct remains strong in females. While they aren’t as apt to display in-your-face affection, female cats are intensely loyal and devoted to their owners. You may even notice your female feline friend trying to “mother” you by staying by your side when you are sick or feeling down.

Males vs. Females: Which Is Better?

As noted above, spaying and neutering play a massive role in determining the personalities and behaviors of cats. No matter which sex you adopt, we strongly recommend altering them so problematic behavior won’t hide the best parts of their personality. And this is in addition to your contribution to preventing cat overpopulation.When deciding between a male and a female, consider your lifestyle and what type of relationship you hope to have with your feline friend. If you want a furry friend who will play with your kids and spend hours snuggled up by your side, adopting a male kitten might be your best bet. If, however, you work long hours and your feline friend will be spending a lot of time alone, consider bringing home a female.Remember that all cats have unique personalities. Many girl cats love cuddling with their owners and are just as rowdy as the boys. And some males are standoffish and perfect spending time alone. Like humans, cats are individuals with their own personalities, likes, and dislikes. When looking for a cat, we strongly suggest getting to know a few potential new furry family members and choosing the one that best suits your preferences and lifestyle.

Spaying Makes Female Cats More Affectionate?

Until that little Siamese came along, all of our female cats were intact.But Christy lost a front paw after being hit by a car, and spaying her seemed like the right thing to do, especially since she’d already gone through one miserable heat.A queen can go into heat as early as 6 months.What’s more, she is seasonally polyestrous and cycles in and out of heat during a good portion of the year starting in January or February and continuing into the fall. In warmer regions, the cycle starts in late December and ends sometime after the summer solstice.A female cat is capable of having 2 or 3 litters every year, and she may continue to do so until she is 8 or 9 years old. So her life essentially evolves around kitten-bearing and rearing.It’s no wonder that Bastet, the cat-headed goddess of ancient Egypt, was associated with maternity.It also may be why spayed females come across as being more loving: Their world is not entirely kitten-centric.In fact, sometimes they transfer all that maternal feeling to their humans. Dawnie, another cat, did that with me after she lost her only kitten and was spayed.So maybe it wasn’t entirely the Siamese thing with Christy. Maybe her having been spayed had just as much to do with her being the little love bug that she was.Chrissie Klinger, writing for Hill’s Pet Nutrition,

Survey: Male Cats Are More Affectionate

A comprehensive poll of feline veterinary practitioners several years ago actually rated“Male cats are often more friendly than female cats,” says Susan Saffron, author of several books on pets and founder of the National Association of Pet Rescue Professionals.While stressing that cat personalities vary widely, she says, “Many male cats have a cuddly ‘lap cat’ personality. Female cats are often more cautious and may take longer to trust you.”Some people clearly still have strong feelings on the subject.I came across an online discussion recently (not very scientific, I know) where the commenters frequently described female cats as bossier and more independent. Others said female cats were more “possessive” or “changeable” in their moods, even “neurotic.”Sometimes, the feeling has a lot to do with what we’re used to.“I never had a female Abyssinian,” says Carla Wong. Her male cat “loved me to pieces. He was the best company ever, loved being groomed, loved a piggy-back ride…. I would get another male.”On the other hand, Wendy Ratza says she always had female cats growing up “because we worried about males that sprayed, and we didn’t want to deal with that.”Her fear was warranted because research demonstrates that “male cats are more likely to spray and fight if they are in households with female cats than with other male cats.”Years later, a male cat named Leo joined her female cat in the household. Fortunately, Leo turned out to be just as affectionate and well behaved as the breeder had promised.Ratza says Leo’s affectionate personality totally changed the way she thought of male cats.

But … There’s Probably No Real Difference

I’ve worked with cats for years — purebreds, strays and barn cats. And I’ve had an equal number of affectionate female cats and affectionate male cats.I’m inclined to say“There is no ultimate answer to the question of whether male cats are better pets than female ones and vice versa,” says Emily Parker, writing for Catalogical.“Each feline furball is one of a kind. Whether your cat is affectionate, loyal, aggressive, territorial, playful or cooped up, it’s a matter of personality and not gender,” she says.Cat expert Ingrid King agrees. “I personally believe that gender, other than as a personal preference of the guardian, is the least important consideration when it comes to choosing a good match for your resident cat,” she says.Early socialization probably plays a greater role than gender does. So does the fact that more and more people are keeping their cats indoors and interacting with them more.