Live Food for Betta?

As time has gone on, weve become far more aware of the nutritional needs of our fish. The most important thing weve learned is that variety is important to keeping our fish healthy, and that feeding the same flake or pellet food every day may not be meeting all of their nutritional needs. Major advances have been made in the world of fish foods, including the addition of live foods, which are extremely nutrient dense but shouldnt be fed as an exclusive diet.

These small crustaceans are easy to care for and reproduce quickly, so youre likely to end up with a self-replenishing food source with live Daphnia. However, this can be difficult to measure out the appropriate amount, and feeding Daphnia daily with no variety will not meet the nutritional needs of your Betta.

Aim to feed no more than what your Betta can eat in 2-3 minutes and make sure Daphnia are part of a regular rotation of foods. 200+ Daphnia per order Easy to care for Reproduce quickly Sustainable food source Enhance coloration in Bettas Protein content of 45% Unlikely to foul water Up to 25 million eggs per order Protein content of 55-60% or more Great for adult and fry Bettas Support rapid growth Easy to care for Unlikely to foul water if fed in correct portions

Require specific conditions Reproduce and grow slowly A pipette or small syringe may be needed for portioning Take 15 24+ hours to hatch May foul water if allowed to die in the tank Typically too large for fry If you have tiny hatchling fry to feed, Insect Sales Infusoria Active Culture may be the perfect food for your needs.

They can easily be cultured and grown at home, making them an excellent sustainable food source, especially if you are breeding Bettas. They do require some care and feeding to ensure they stay healthy and reproduce, and their extremely tiny bodies can make it difficult to see if they are thriving or not. Will foul the water if overfed A pipette or dropper may be needed for portioning Require some feeding and care to thrive Difficult to see

UHT Black Mosquito Larvae are a nice option if feeding actively living things freaks you out. They contain 74% protein and are rich in astaxanthin, which supports brilliant color development and reproductive health. Will not move since they are not alive Will foul the water if not eaten or removed Only good for 45 days in the refrigerator once opened Freezing may reduce nutrient density

Although they are not alive, this product is formulated to keep the baby Brine shrimp in the water column for a long time, allowing your Betta to hunt for them. No hatching or care necessary More than 1.5 million baby Brine shrimp per jar Formulated to suspend the food in the water column Small enough for fry 55 60% protein content The Zoo Med Can O Cyclops is another great option for a food source that is killed right before packing, ensuring it is fresh.

No care necessary Protein content between 44 52% High in carotenoids to support color development Good food for fry Only good for 1 week in the refrigerator after opening May be too small for adult Bettas Not alive Uneaten food will foul the water Not sustainable This allows your Betta to have a more natural feeding experience and creates a fantastic but easy source of enrichment in its life.

Maintaining live food does take a little extra effort on your part, but its worth it knowing youre providing your Betta with a nutrient rich diet. Image Credit: Marko25, ShutterstockIf you have a tendency to overfeed, then youll need to carefully consider what type of live food to offer to your Betta fish. Some people are unsure about feeding live foods, whether its related to their ethical beliefs or their desire to not have to handle creepy crawlies.

If youre on a tight budget, then youll appreciate the VPoint Brine Shrimp Eggs , which allow you to hatch as many Daphnia as you need at that time.

Can betta fish eat live food?

Live Food. Live food usually consists of aquatic insects like bloodworm, brine shrimp and daphnia ; similar to what bettas would eat in the wild, thus making live food one of the best options for your betta.

What real food can betta fish eat?

Bettas are small, carnivorous fish, which means they need high amounts of protein in their diet to survive and thrive. In the wild, betta fish eat other small, meaty creatures such as bloodworms, daphnia, mosquito larvae, brine shrimp, and even other tiny fish.

What is the best live food for betta fry?

Vinegar eels..Micro-worms..Walter worms..Banana worms..Baby brine shrimp..Daphnia..Fairy shrimp..Grindal worms.

Are live plants bad for betta fish?

Things to Keep in Mind. Betta fish are known to be jumpers, and experts recommend they be housed in lidded aquariums. As such, avoid plants that will grow above the water’s surface and push up the tank’s lid. Meanwhile, any plant, even a plant safe for bettas, become unsafe for fish when they die.

In the wild bettas spend most of their time hunting for live food. In your tank, however, they dont have to worry about this and a lot of people only feed their betta pellets or flakes. While this isnt a problem, its always good to make sure your betta is getting a varied diet, including live food. So keep reading to find out what the best live food for betta fish is! (And which foods are better of freeze-dried or frozen.)

If you give your betta a lot of pellet or flake food then daphnia can often be a great choice to keep their digestive system moving. Not only do they eat a lot of plant life which your betta will also ingest, but their skeleton is also filled with fibrous material.

Because theyre great at keeping your bettas digestive system moving, you dont have to worry as much about constipation, however, overfeeding will still result in weight gain. Unlike a lot of other live foods, mosquito larvae are one of the staple meals of bettas in the wild. Mosquito larvae can be fed to your betta regularly without having to worry too much about the adverse effects, unlike some other live foods.

You can feed your betta mosquito larvae a couple of times a day, however, while they do provide most of his nutrition its still important to mix things up. Black worms may not be as common as a lot of other foods on this list, but dont let that deter you. They are a fantastic part of a balanced diet and provide a good amount of the nutrients bettas require.

However, while black worms are a fantastic choice they shouldnt be considered a staple part of your bettas diet. Theyre extremely rich in nutrients and if fed too much they can cause problems with the digestive system such as constipation. If you planned on starting your own fruit fly culture you can normally pick up everything you need in pet stores or online.

While micro worms can be a great staple for your bettas diet, just like with every other live food, they shouldnt be the ONLY thing hes eating. Too much fat in your bettas diet can cause issues with digestion and oftentimes results in constipation. One of the benefits of using moina over regular daphnia is the fact that they have a higher protein content.

They are great at supplementing your bettas diet, however, just like a lot of live food, they should only be used in moderation. The problem with brine shrimp is that theyre incredibly rich, so if you feed them to your betta too often they can have an adverse effect on his health. Unlike other live foods, brine shrimp are going to require saltwater to grow not freshwater.

Unlike other foods, they arent too rich in fat, but instead, theyre high in fiber and roughage. While all live food poses a risk of passing on diseases and parasites, its more likely to happen with tubifex worms. If youre going to feed your betta tubifex worms, make sure youre breeding them yourself, or getting them from an extremely reputable source.

If your betta doesnt eat one, then it will most likely burrow into the substrate where it will eventually die and rot. Not only are fairy shrimp great food for your betta, but theyre also incredibly easy to breed. If you plan on feeding your betta fairy shrimp then you may be better off, growing your own culture so you dont have to keep buying them.

If you dont buy it from a reputable seller, then you may end up infecting your betta with all sorts of diseases. Theres no real way to spot whether live food is infected with parasites or bacteria either. However, as well as buying live food from a reputable seller, you can also lower the chances by growing it yourself.

Dont Overfeed Him If youre feeding your betta live food, then the chances are hes going to eat as much as he can. As a rule of thumb, you should never feed your betta a portion bigger than the size of his eye 1-3 times a day.

Figuring out the best diet for your betta fish can be quite a challenge. There are many different brands and varieties of betta fish food available in pet/aquarium stores and online, but unfortunately, not all of them are high-quality or even good to feed your betta! If youre struggling with what, when, or how to feed your betta fish, youre definitely not the only one.

This has been a common problem in fish husbandry for a long time and hobbyists have learned how to work around it. The best way to have a steady flow of reliable live foods to feed your betta fish is by culturing them yourself.

For safe and fun live betta food, you can try hatching your own brine shrimp eggs or wingless fruit flies . These foods make a great betta meal when thawed properly and are easy to store! Whether its brine shrimp, bloodworms, or mosquito larvae, make sure to follow the instructions on the back of the package before throwing the cube into the tank water!

It is best if you turn all equipment off during feeding time so that you can remove any excess food to prevent leftovers from breaking down and causing future water quality issues. These foods will typically be the same, with a selection of bloodworms, mosquito larvae, and brine shrimp, but all of the moisture has been removed. While freeze dried foods are an easy alternative, they dont always provide the best supplementation because so much nutritional value has already been taken; there is also a common issue that these foods tend to expand in the gut of the betta fish after being eaten, causing your fish to possibly bloat or become constipated.

The simple fix to this is soaking the pieces of food in tank water or other prepared liquid before feeding. An example of a popular and good quality staple fish pellet is New Life Spectrum Betta Formula . If your betta happens to be refusing food because of stress due to transport or illness, dont worry.

Dont leave uneaten betta fish food in your aquarium; remove it immediately. Rotting food can cause bad water quality and will eventually become very dangerous to your betta as ammonia builds in the tank .

If youre wondering what betta fish food, or how much and how often, youre not alone. Surprisingly this is one of the most frequent questions when it comes to first-time betta keeping, and overfeeding is very common! To further complicate things, its not always wise to rely on the information from pet stores or on the food product labels either.

Live, freeze-dried, or frozen foods can be used as treats or implemented into their daily feeding routine too. To keep your betta happy and healthy please follow each food and feeding guideline below as these tips could literally save your fishs life:

The best betta food replicates these specific dietary needs without a lot of added and indigestible fillers. Its best then, to provide a variety of high-quality pellets, flakes, freeze dried, frozen and live foods . Providing the best nutritional value focuses on a bettas need of protein, fat, fiber, phosphorus, carbohydrates, calcium, and vitamins (A, D3, E, K, B1, B2, B3, B5, B6, B12, C, H, M).

Betta fish have very short digestive tracts and do not process fillers like corn and wheat very well. These fillers are often found in many pellet and flake foods and can lead to excess bloat and digestive issues (e.g. constipation). Pellets are the most common betta fish food on the market, with quality varying greatly across each.

This can cause bloating and digestive issues if youre not careful as theyll expand in your bettas stomach. For pellets that expand once wet, soak them in tank water before feeding to hydrate them, especially if your betta attacks food instantly. PictureNameAnalysisProsConsPriceRating NorthFin Betta Bits -Crude Protein (min): 45%-No fillers or hormones-No dyes or artificial coloring

– May be hard to find, except online$$$$5.0 New Life Spectrum Betta Formula -Crude Protein (min): 37%-Color enhancing ingredients-High-quality ingredients $$3.8 Aqueon Betta Food -Crude Protein (min): 38%-Small pellet size-Comes in color enhancing blend Freeze dried foods have been stripped of their moisture and have added fillers to keep them stable.

Its recommended that you soak them in tank water before feeding to rehydrate them, increasing the moisture content. Feeding only freeze dried food can lead to bloating and constipation issues . One large benefit to freeze dried foods, however, is they are free of bacteria and parasites.They are also easy to find at local fish stores and online and are relatively inexpensive.

Betta fish are carnivores and they get increasingly aggressive during feedings when they have to stalk their prey. A staple in their natural habitat, mosquito larvae are an excellent betta food option. While they may be hard to source during the winter months, mosquitos and their larvae are very active and abundant during spring and summer and in warmer climates.

Purchase a starter culture and harvest them yourself, or find a reputable local or online store that carries them. Brine shrimp are packed with the nutritional needs that betta fish need to thrive on (proteins, vitamins, and amino acids), and theyre easy to raise too. They can also be found at most local fish stores, making them a good option for varying up your bettas diet.

Bloodworms or Glycera are the larvae of the midge fly and can be found in pools and ponds of water. Betta fish commonly gorge on them in the wild, making them ideal variations for even the pickiest of eaters. Bettas put on a big show when going after these guys, but they shouldnt be used as the exclusive source of food because they lack amino acids.

Have you ever left bananas, apples or other fruit out in your kitchen, and all of a sudden theres swarms of little bugs flying around them? Instead, there is a wingless and flightless variety that is ideal for feeding betta fish and can even be bred and harvested in a small container inexpensively. Pay no attention to the amount and instructions on the side of the betta fish food can.

Overfeeding and overeating can lead to constipation , bloating, obesity (thats right betta fish can get fat), swim bladder problems , contracting diseases because of the bacteria feeding on the excess food breaking down, and even death. Always clean up any excess food that falls to the bottom of the tank with an aquarium designated turkey baster. This will prevent ammonia buildup and the potential for harmful diseases being present from food decay.

Its also a good idea to not feed your betta one day per week, this gives their digestive tract time to fully process food and it limits problems associated with overeating. If your betta fish wont eat or seems completely uninterested in food dont worry. A lack of appetite may mean that they are not hungry or have recently undergone some type of stress (e.g. tank cleaning, new home, abrupt water temperature changes).

Cold water that is outside of the recommended range of 76-81 degrees Fahrenheit may also cause your betta to act lethargic and will slow their metabolism . Just like when we are sick, betta fish also wont have big appetites while they are ill. Make sure to monitor for signs of illness and disease , and initiate the proper treatments as soon as possible. Thats a lot of information to digest, but as a betta keeper, it is our responsibility to make sure they have a well-balanced diet for optimal health.

Feeding a variety of different foods will provide the array of nutrients a betta fish needs to thrive. How much to feed your betta fish can depend on their individual activity level, but 2-3 pellets 1-2 times daily is a safe amount. Get in the habit of sticking to a regular feeding schedule so that you dont forget whether or not you fed them.

Please ask any questions you may still have about specific betta fish food and feeding procedures in the comments below.

Betta fish flakes and pellets

As with pretty much any fish species, variety is the key to your betta’s diet. Most tropical fish and betta fish keepers choose to use a high-quality pellet or flake food as a staple, though it is not uncommon for betta fish to refuse flakes. It is important to keep in mind that betta fish tend to be messy eaters, and any uneaten food will sink to the bottom of the tank; make sure to remove any excess food as soon as you see that your betta has finished eating.It is also important to buy fish food that is specifically meant for betta fish; betta fish food is exceptionally high in crude protein and tropical fish flakes won’t give your betta the nutrients it truly needs to thrive. More information on what makes a fish pellet or flake ‘high quality’ can be found below.Because feeding nothing but this staple food wouldn’t make for the best diet, it’s a good idea to also get some other different types of food to offer your betta as well.

Live food

Some fishkeepers choose to feed live foods that are usually sold at fish stores; feeding live food tends to lead to some of the healthiest betta fish. The most popular live foods include brine shrimp, mosquito larvae, and bloodworms. While this food will make your betta fish get some activity (betta fish feeding can be very exciting to watch!), you are also introducing the risk of bringing parasites into your tank. Because of this same threat, it is never advised to feed your betta fish anything that you may have found outside.So does that mean that you should never try feeding your betta fish live foods? Of course not! This has been a common problem in fish husbandry for a long time and hobbyists have learned how to work around it. The best way to have a steady flow of reliable live foods to feed your betta fish is by culturing them yourself. For safe and fun live betta food, you can try hatching your own brine shrimp eggs or wingless fruit flies.By culturing your own live food, you can regulate what they eat–and in turn, regulate the nutrients your betta fish will be getting when it eats the food–and monitor the overall health of the colony. If you start to realize that numbers are decreasing, you can address the problem and not leave unsolved problems up to chance when buying from the fish store.The second best way to get reputable live foods is by shopping at the best reputable fish stores. Many times the food you are buying is actually the same food they use to feed their fish; if it isn’t, don’t be afraid to ask why they might be feeding something different. And never be ashamed to ask to see if you can observe a staff member feeding the fish! You always want to make sure that the fish is willingly feeding and you get the chance to see its preferred food.If your betta fish doesn’t like live food or it’s too hard to get or cultivate on your own, you can always try feeding frozen betta foods.

Frozen food

There are plenty of frozen fish food options available if your betta fish refuses fish flakes, and most are identical to the variety that comes with live foods. I personally always have at least two types of frozen food (white/black mosquito larvae, bloodworms, brine shrimp) lying around to offer my betta fish variety from time to time. These foods make a great betta meal when thawed properly and are easy to store!For the most part, any fish food that comes live also comes frozen; there is just the convenience that frozen foods last longer and can be better rationed at feeding time. Whether it’s brine shrimp, bloodworms, or mosquito larvae, make sure to follow the instructions on the back of the package before throwing the cube into the tank water! Typically you will want to take some water out from your tank, put the cube in, and wait for a few minutes until the cube starts to dissolve and fall apart. Never use tap water during this process as that will indirectly add nutrients and heavy metals into your tank water that you may not want, affecting your overall water quality and the health of your fish!One of the main problems fish enthusiasts run into is that frozen food can be messy; these cubes surprisingly contain a lot of food, and it’s easy for pieces to be quickly carried away by the water current under decorations and into the filter. It is best if you turn all equipment off during feeding time so that you can remove any excess food to prevent leftovers from breaking down and causing future water quality issues.

Freeze dried food

If your betta fish doesn’t eat fish flakes and you don’t have access to live foods or frozen foods, there is always the last alternative: freeze dried foods. These foods will typically be the same, with a selection of bloodworms, mosquito larvae, and brine shrimp, but all of the moisture has been removed. While freeze dried foods are an easy alternative, they don’t always provide the best supplementation because so much nutritional value has already been taken; there is also a common issue that these foods tend to expand in the gut of the betta fish after being eaten, causing your fish to possibly bloat or become constipated. The simple fix to this is soaking the pieces of food in tank water or other prepared liquid before feeding.However, you never have to worry about introducing parasites into your tank and it’s an easy food to give if you don’t have many other options!

High-quality betta food

With all the betta fish foods that all claim they are the best, it can be difficult to figure out which one to actually buy. Luckily, the ingredient list can tell you a lot! As mentioned before, betta fish are carnivores that need a very high protein diet. However, protein-based ingredients, like fish, are quite expensive; more expensive than cheaper plant-based ingredients like wheat or soy.Many manufacturers of betta food, therefore, choose to use more plant-based ingredients and other cheap options like fishmeal instead of using the whole fish; fishmeal is all the leftover bits that fisheries don’t have any other use for after all the quality pieces have been sold to market. The downside of this, of course, is that the food is not the absolute best that it could be for your betta.A betta food that lists more plant-based ingredients and fishmeal at the top of the ingredient list is bad quality and you should avoid it. A betta food that lists “whole” fish products as the first few ingredients is a better idea and will lead to a much healthier fish. An example of a popular and good quality staple fish pellet is New Life Spectrum Betta Formula.Note: many websites list that flakes are not good betta food. This is because many flakes are of bad quality and contain too many plant-based ingredients and fillers. However, not all flakes are inherently bad: the same rules apply and there is nothing wrong with a high-quality betta flake food.

Best Betta Fish Food: Dietary Requirements

Betta fish are classified as carnivores, and eat insects in the wild. The best betta food replicates these specific dietary needs without a lot of added and indigestible fillers. For most betta keepers it may not be possible to source or provide live foods as a betta fish’s main diet. It’s best then, to
Betta fish have very short digestive tracts and do not process fillers like corn and wheat very well. These fillers are often found in many pellet and flake foods and can lead to excess bloat and digestive issues (e.g. constipation). Betta’s receive no nutritional benefit from fillers and just pass them off as waste. It’s very important you provide foods high in protein to satisfy their carnivorous needs. Fiber and moisture are also important to aid their digestion.

Betta Fish Pellets

Pellets are the most common betta fish food on the market, with quality varying greatly across each. The best pellets for betta fish will have fewer fillers and more high-quality ingredients that help fish thrive. Some betta fish pellets expand significantly after they are exposed to water.This can cause bloating and digestive issues if you’re not careful as they’ll expand in your betta’s stomach. For

Freeze-Dried Betta Food

Freeze dried food is a great option to introduce some of the betta’s natural food into their diet, but it does not replace the quality of live or frozen foods. Freeze dried foods have been stripped of their moisture and have added fillers to keep them stable.It’s recommended that you soak them in tank water before feeding to rehydrate them, increasing the moisture content.One large benefit to freeze dried foods, however, is they are free of bacteria and parasites.They are also easy to find at local fish stores and online and are relatively inexpensive. They store well and often come in your typical fish food containers.

Betta Fish Flakes

There are specific flakes made specifically for betta fish. Do not feed your betta other tropical fish flakes because they lack the protein requirements bettas need. Betta flakes can be a staple in regular feedings, but they can also be very messy. Excess or sunken flakes should be removed immediately after feeding. Betta fish often refuse to eat flakes as well.

Live & Frozen Betta Food

If you’ve never fed your betta anything other than pellets then you and your betta are missing out. Betta fish are carnivores and they get increasingly aggressive during feedings when they have to stalk their prey. This is also the best way to replicate their natural habitat and food sources.Some are harder to source than others but make for a balanced diet.Frozen foods come in many of the same options. It’s a great alternative to keeping live food. Frozen betta food may be kept in your freezer until you’re ready to defrost and feed them to your betta. Only take as much as you need placing the rest back into the freezer to prevent thawing. Never refreeze any food that has been thawed as it could have been exposed to bacteria.These options below are a betta’s favorites:

Live/Frozen Mosquito Larvae

A staple in their natural habitat, mosquito larvae are an excellent betta food option. While they may be hard to source during the winter months, mosquitos and their larvae are very active and abundant during spring and summer and in warmer climates. Purchase a starter culture and harvest them yourself, or find a reputable local or online store that carries them.

Live/Frozen Brine Shrimp

Brine shrimp are an aquatic crustacean that betta fish love. The photo above is zoomed in, from the University of Utah, they only grow up to 1 centimeter as adults. Brine shrimp are packed with the nutritional needs that betta fish need to thrive on (proteins, vitamins, and amino acids), and they’re easy to raise too. They can also be found at most local fish stores, making them a good option for varying up your betta’s diet.

Live/Frozen Bloodworms

Bloodworms or Glycera are the larvae of the midge fly and can be found in pools and ponds of water. Betta fish commonly gorge on them in the wild, making them ideal variations for even the pickiest of eaters. Betta’s put on a big show when going after these guys, but they shouldn’t be used as the exclusive source of food because they lack amino acids. They are high in iron content, resulting in their bright red coloring. If you can’t handle the live option (they are pretty gross looking), they also come in a gel or freeze-dried option.

Live/Frozen Wingless Fruit Flies

Also known as the vinegar fly, the common fruit fly is something you are probably very familiar with. Have you ever left bananas, apples or other fruit out in your kitchen, and all of a sudden there’s swarms of little bugs flying around them? Those are fruit flies and betta fish love them because they are insectivores. While you can technically drop them in for feeding, you don’t know what diseases they may have and they may fly out. Instead, there is a wingless and flightless variety that is ideal for feeding betta fish and can even be bred and harvested in a small container inexpensively.

Live/Frozen Mysis Shrimp

Mysis shrimp, or opossum shrimp, are another great option for betta fish because of their exoskeleton. This exterior is rich in fiber, which aids the digestion of protein-rich foods. If your betta fish is a picky eater, these guys might do the trick for some variety. They are packed with betta-loving nutrients, more so than brine shrimp, and are also high in moisture and amino acids.

Ideal Feeding Schedule:

Adult bettas can be fed once per day, and babies (fry) can be fed twice per day. It might not seem like enough, but many pellets expand to more than 2X their size once they get wet. To put this into further perspective,Bettas will overeat if you let them. Overfeeding and overeating can lead to constipation, bloating, obesity (that’s right betta fish can get fat), swim bladder problems, contracting diseases because of the bacteria feeding on the excess food breaking down, and even death.

What If Your Betta Fish Won’t Eat?

If your betta fish won’t eat or seems completely uninterested in food don’t worry. A lack of appetite may mean that they are not hungry or have recently undergone some type of stress (e.g. tank cleaning, new home, abrupt water temperature changes). Again, don’t worry about a couple days because bettas can survive up to 14 days without food.Cold water that is outside of the recommended range of 76-81 degrees Fahrenheit may also cause your betta to act lethargic and will slow their metabolism. A lower metabolism means they will need fewer feedings. As betta fish get older they will also be less active and may eat less frequently, this is normal.Once a betta recovers, their appetite will also begin to come back too. As mentioned above bettas can be picky too.