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The Cavalier King Charles Spaniel is a breed which the The Kennel Club classifies as a toy dog. It is a small spaniel that comes from the United Kingdom, growing in popularity in the United States since the turn of the 21st century. This dog currently ranks as one of the top 20 most popular pure-breed options in the U.S. right now.

It is a highly social breed, so it does require a lot of human interaction to maintain a healthy mental state. This habit can grow out of control if you don’t place some limits on it, so set some boundaries around the dinner table and other areas where you want to prohibit the behavior. When you start working with Cavalier King Charles Spaniel puppies, then you will notice right away that they are highly intelligent and capable dogs. There is an appearance of regal sophistication with Cavalier King Charles Spaniels, yet they still remain very cute with the charm that they put on everyone. Some can struggle with young kids who might pull on their ears because this is a highly sensitive area, which could lead to nips in rare instances. That means you have more opportunities to work with reputable breeders who are not backlogged with massive orders like other popular canine breeds. You’ll also need to comb out their fur after every outside play session because their low profile to the ground can cause grass, stems, twigs, and burrs to get stuck in there regularly. Although these dogs are gentle and friendly, trying to get inside of the ear of Cavalier King Charles Spaniels can be a unique challenge. It isn’t bad if you can start this habit when they are a puppy, but older dogs who are unfamiliar with this task will fight you on it every single time. If you have ever had to deal with a cat who pesters you about their food dish because they can see the bottom of the container, then you’ll have an idea of what it is like to live with Cavalier King Charles Spaniels. If you do not strictly manage the eating habits of your Cavalier King Charles Spaniel, then the dog will become overweight very quickly. This breed also requires a lot of attention to relieve anxiety, so if you are gone for long periods during the day, then these dogs might not be the best choice.

How much do King Charles Spaniels cost?

Cavalier King Charles Spaniels cost about the same as most small breeds. The average price is around $1,500 for a high-quality puppy from a recognized breeder. However, you can find them ranging from $1,000 to $2,500. Of course, where you purchase them from matters.

What's bad about Cavalier King Charles?

Cavalier King Charles Spaniels have several hereditary conditions which are common. Retinal disorders, cataracts, slipping patella, and hip dysplasia occur frequently. Mitral valve disease and syringomyelia are also more common with these dogs when compared to other breeds.

Are King Charles Spaniels good pets?

The Cavalier is an intelligent and fearless companion, but is not known to be a good watchdog even though they can alarm bark because they are often overly social with strangers. The Cavalier King Charles Spaniel is a generally healthy breed with an average lifespan of 9-14 years.

Do King Charles spaniels bark a lot?

Generally speaking, the Cavalier King Charles Spaniel doesn’t bark a lot. They’re docile nature makes such a behaviour uncharacteristic for these dogs. … Alternatively, some Cavalier owners admit these dogs may bark if they hear other dogs barking.

Finding a good breeder is the key to finding the right puppy. A good breeder will match you with the right puppy, and will without question have done all the health certifications necessary to screen out health problems as much as is possible. He or she is more interested in placing pups in the right homes than in making big bucks.

If you take a Cavalier puppy out on a regular schedule, reward him for pottying outdoors and limit his freedom in the home until he’s reliable, there is no reason he can’t be housetrained as well as any other breed. He often has the same “birdy” nature as his larger spaniel cousins, making him a good choice for people who want a dog who’s not too big but still capable of going for hikes, chasing seagulls at the beach or even retrieving quail, given the training and opportunity. They were found in royal courts and noble homes in Spain (where the spaniel gets his name), France, England and Scotland and were often prominently featured in their owners’ portraits. It’s difficult or impossible to curb these behaviors so you need to find a way to work around them, such as always keeping the dog on leash in areas with traffic and hardening your heart when your Cavalier wants to share your French fries. Many toy breeds and small dogs, the Cavalier included, have a condition known as luxating patella, in which one or both kneecaps are unstable and occasionally, or in more severe cases, always slip out of place. It is usually diagnosed with an MRI or CT scan and treated by surgically removing the mucus plug and then flushing the ear, followed by a course of antibiotics and/or corticosteroids. The long, silky hair on the Cavalier’s ears, tail, belly and legs, known as feathering, should be brushed two or three times a week to prevent mats or tangles from forming. Start your puppy search by finding a breeder who is a member in good standing of either the Cavalier King Charles Spaniel Club – USA or the American Cavalier King Charles Spaniel Club , and who has agreed to abide by the CKCSC’s code of ethics or the ACKCSC’s ethical guidelines , both of which specifically prohibit selling puppies through retail outlets such as pet stores and outline the responsibility their member breeders have to the dogs they produce and the people who purchase them. You should also bear in mind that buying a puppy from websites that offer to ship your dog to you immediately can be a risky venture, as it leaves you no recourse if what you get isn’t exactly what you expected. The cost of a Cavalier puppy varies depending on his place of origin, whether he is male or female, what titles his parents have, and whether he is best suited for the show ring or a pet home. For that price, the puppy you buy should have been raised in a clean home environment, from parents with health clearances and conformation (show) titles to prove that they are good specimens of the breed. The American Cavalier King Charles Spaniel Club’s Rescue Network can help you find a dog that may be the perfect companion for your family.

The Cavalier King Charles Spaniel is a small breed of spaniel classed in the toy group of The Kennel Club and the American Kennel Club[1] that originated in the United Kingdom. Since 2000, it has grown in popularity in the United States and ranks as the 19th most popular pure-breed in the United States.[2] It has a silky, smooth coat and commonly a smooth undocked tail. The breed standard recognizes four colours: Blenheim (chestnut and white), tricolour (black/white/tan), black and tan, and ruby.[1] The breed is generally friendly, placid, and good with both children and other animals; however, they require much human interaction. Since they are family dogs, it is recommended to not leave one alone for long periods at a time. The expected lifespan of a Cavalier King Charles Spaniel is between nine and fourteen years.[3]

OriginEnglandHeight
12–13 inches (30–33 cm)Weight
13–20–28 lb (5.9–9.1–12.7 kg)Colour
Blenheim, Black and Tan, Ruby, and Tri-ColourDog ( domestic dog )The Cavalier King Charles Spaniel is a small breed of spaniel classed in the toy group of The Kennel Club and the American Kennel Club [1] that originated in the United Kingdom . The breed standard recognizes four colours: Blenheim (chestnut and white), tricolour (black/white/tan), black and tan, and ruby . A white blaze between the eyes is standard of the Tricolour variety.Correct Ruby Cavalier King Charles Spaniel; uniform chestnut colour, with no white markings; ears and slippers are often slightly lighter but dark chestnut colour should predominateDuring the early part of the 18th century, John Churchill, 1st Duke of Marlborough , kept red and white King Charles type spaniels for hunting. In 1926, the American Roswell Eldridge offered a dog show class prize of twenty-five pounds of sterling silver each as a prize for the best male and females of “Blenheim Spaniels of the old type, as shown in pictures of Charles II of England ‘s time, long face, no stop, flat skull, not inclined to be domed, with spot in center of skull.” [6] The breeders of the era were appalled, although several entered what they considered to be sub-par Cavalier King Charles Spaniels in the competition. Eldridge died before seeing his plan come to fruition, but several breeders believed in what he said and in 1928 the first Cavalier club was formed. [6] The first standard was created, based on a dog named “Ann’s Son” owned by Mostyn Walker, [7] and the Kennel Club recognized the variety as “King Charles Spaniels, Cavalier type”. And in 1945, [9] the Kennel Club first recognized the breed in its own right as the Cavalier King Charles Spaniel. The first recorded Cavalier living in the United States was brought from the United Kingdom in 1956 by W. Lyon Brown, together with Elizabeth Spalding and other enthusiasts, she founded the Cavalier King Charles Club USA that continues to the present day. Breed standards state that height of a Cavalier should be between 12 to 13 inches (30 to 33 cm) with a proportionate weight between 13 to 18 pounds (5.9 to 8.2 kg). Tricolour Cavalier King Charles SpanielsCavalier King Charles Spaniel, Blenheim variety, with chestnut brown markings on a white background on its back, patches over eyes and all brown earsThe breed has four recognized colours. [13] The Blenheim spot is also known as the mark of the “Duchess Thumb Print”, based on the legend that Sarah Churchill, Duchess of Marlborough while awaiting news of her husband’s safe return from the Battle of Blenheim , pressed the head of an expecting dam with her thumb, resulting in five puppies bearing the lucky mark after news that the battle had been won. According to statistics released by The Kennel Club , Cavaliers were the 6th most popular dog in the United Kingdom in 2007 with 11,422 registrations in a single year. [23] In 2009, the Cavalier was the 4th most popular breed in Australia with 3,196 registrations behind only Labrador Retrievers , German Shepherd Dogs and Staffordshire Bull Terriers . [24] In addition, there are also national breed clubs in Belgium, Canada, Czech Republic, Denmark, Finland, France, Germany, Netherlands, New Zealand, Norway, South Africa, Spain and Sweden. Cavaliers are successful in conformation shows, obedience and agility and they also make wonderful therapy dogs due to their sweet, gentle natures. [1] The breed is adaptable in their need for exercise, happy with either sleeping on the couch or taking long walks. The breed is well known for its loving temperament.They have an instinct to chase most things that move including vehicles on busy streets, and so most Cavaliers will never become “street-wise”. [28] As they tend to regard all strangers as friends, members of the breed will usually not make good guard dogs. However, owners have reported that through training their Cavaliers live happily with a variety of small animals including hamsters and gerbils . [1] However, some owners prefer to trim their Cavalier’s long feathers and slippers that can become very dirty when walking or playing outside. Some serious genetic health problems, including early-onset mitral valve disease (MVD), the potentially severely painful syringomyelia (SM), hip dysplasia , luxating patellas, and certain vision and hearing disorders are health problems for this breed. [31] The health problems shared with this breed include mitral valve disease, luxating patella , and hereditary eye issues such as cataracts and retinal dysplasia . A survey by The Kennel Club of the United Kingdom showed that 42.8% of Cavalier deaths are cardiac related. Syringomyelia (SM) is a condition affecting the brain and spine, causing symptoms ranging from mild discomfort to severe pain and partial paralysis. Scratching typical of SM is usually worse when the dog is wearing a collar, is being walked on leash, or is excited, and first thing in the morning or at night. Not all dogs who show scratching behavior appear to be in pain, though several leading researchers, including Dr Clare Rusbridge in the UK and Drs Curtis Dewey and Dominic Marino in the US, believe scratching in SM cavaliers is a sign of pain and discomfort and of existing neurological damage to the dorsal horn region of the spine. A veterinarian will rule out basic causes of scratching or discomfort such as ear mites , fleas , and allergies, and then, primary secretory otitis media (PSOM – glue ear), as well as spinal or limb injuries, before assuming that a Cavalier has SM. [42] Severity of symptoms can range from mild, occasional falling to freezing to seizure-like episodes lasting hours. The platelets in the blood of many Cavalier King Charles Spaniels are a combination of those of normal size for dogs and others that are abnormally oversized, or macrothrombocytes. Hip dysplasia is a common genetic disease that affects Cavalier King Charles Spaniels. The grades 3–4 are most severe where surgery will most likely be needed to correct the problem to avoid the development of arthritis and lameness in the limb. According to the Canine Inherited Disorders Database, the condition requires continual treatment and if untreated may result in partial or total blindness. Cavalier King Charles Spaniels may be predisposed to a form of congenital deafness, which is present at birth, due to a lack of formation or early degeneration of receptors in the inner ear, although this is relatively rare. ^ “Summary Results of the Purebred Dog Health Survey for Cavalier King Charles Spaniels” (PDF) . ^ a b Gill, Jennifer L.; Tsai, Kate L.; Krey, Christa; Noorai, Rooksana E.; Vanbellinghen, Jean-François; Garosi, Laurent S.; Shelton, G. Diane; Clark, Leigh Anne; Harvey, Robert J.

The Cavalier King Charles Spaniel wears his connection to British history in his breed’s name. Cavaliers are the best of two worlds, combining the gentle attentiveness of a toy breed with the verve and athleticism of a sporting spaniel.

List of the Pros of the Cavalier King Charles Spaniel

Finding a Cavalier King Charles Spaniel

Whether you want to go with a breeder or get your dog from a shelter or rescue, here are some things to keep in mind.

Choosing a Cavalier Breeder

Finding a good breeder is the key to finding the right puppy. A good breeder will match you with the right puppy, and will without question have done all the health certifications necessary to screen out health problems as much as is possible. He or she is more interested in placing pups in the right homes than in making big bucks.
Good breeders will welcome your questions about temperament, health clearances and what the
dogs are like to live with and come right back at you with questions of their own about what you’re looking for in a dog and what kind of life you can provide for him. A good breeder can tell you about the history of the breed, eXplain why one puppy is considered pet quality while another is not, and discuss what health problems affect the breed and the steps she takes take to avoid those problems.
Start your puppy search by finding a breeder who is a member in good standing of either the
Cavalier King Charles Spaniel Club – USA or the
American Cavalier King Charles Spaniel Club, and who has agreed to abide by the CKCSC’s
code of ethics or the ACKCSC’s
ethical guidelines, both of which specifically prohibit selling puppies through retail outlets such as pet stores and outline the responsibility their member breeders have to the dogs they produce and the people who purchase them. Choose a breeder who is not only willing but insists on being a resource as you train and care for your new dog throughout his life.
Avoid breeders who only seem interested in how quickly they can unload a puppy on you and whether your credit card will go through. You should also bear in mind that buying a puppy from websites that offer to ship your dog to you immediately can be a risky venture, as it leaves you no recourse if what you get isn’t exactly what you expected. Put at least as much effort into researching your puppy as you would into choosing a new car or expensive appliance. It will save you money in the long run.
Many reputable breeders have websites, so how can you tell who’s good and who’s not? Red flags include puppies always being available, multiple litters on the premises, having your choice of any puppy, and the ability to pay online with a credit card. Those things are convenient, but they are almost never associated with reputable breeders.
Whether you’re planning to get your new best friend from a breeder, a pet store, or another source, don’t forget that old adage “let the buyer beware”. Disreputable breeders and facilities that deal with puppy mills can be hard to distinguish from reliable operations. There’s no 100% guaranteed way to make sure you’ll never purchase a sick puppy, but researching the breed (so you know what to expect), checking out the facility (to identify unhealthy conditions or sick animals), and asking the right questions can reduce the chances of heading into a disastrous situation. And don’t forget to ask your veterinarian, who can often refer you to a reputable breeder, breed rescue organization, or other reliable source for healthy puppies.
The cost of a Cavalier puppy varies depending on his place of origin, whether he is male or female, what titles his parents have, and whether he is best suited for the show ring or a pet home. Expect to pay between $2,000 and $3,000 for one of these popular pups. For that price, the puppy you buy should have been raised in a clean home environment, from parents with health clearances and conformation (show) titles to prove that they are good specimens of the breed.Puppies should be temperament tested, vetted, dewormed, and socialized to give them a healthy, confidentstart in life.
Before you decide to buy a puppy, consider whether an adult Cavalier might better suit your needs and lifestyle. Puppies are loads of fun, but they require a lot of time and effort before they grow up to become the dog of your dreams. An adult Cavalier may already have some training and will probably be less active, destructive and demanding than a puppy. With an adult, you know more about what you’re getting in terms of personality and health and you can find adults through breeders or shelters. If you are interested in acquiring an older dog through breeders, ask them about purchasing a retired show dog or if they know of an adult dog who needs a new home. If you want to adopt a dog, read the advice below on how to do that.

Cavalier King Charles Spaniel

TheThe Cavalier King Charles changed dramatically in the late 17th century, when it was interbred with flat-nosed breeds. Until the 1920s, the Cavalier shared the same history as the smaller King Charles Spaniel. Breeders attempted to recreate what they considered to be the original configuration of the breed, a dog resembling Charles II’s King Charles Spaniel of the Restoration.

History[edit]

During the early part of the 18th century, John Churchill, 1st Duke of Marlborough, kept red and white King Charles type spaniels for hunting. The duke recorded that they were able to keep up with a trotting horse. His estate was named Blenheim in honor of his victory at the Battle of Blenheim. Because of this influence, the red and white variety of the King Charles Spaniel and thus the Cavalier King Charles Spaniel became known as the Blenheim.Attempts were made to recreate the original Cavalier King Charles Spaniel as early as the turn of the 20th century, using the now extinct Toy Trawler Spaniels. These attempts were documented by Judith Blunt-Lytton, 16th Baroness Wentworth, in the book

Divergence from King Charles Spaniel[edit]

In 1926, the American Roswell Eldridge offered a dog show class prize of twenty-five pounds of sterling silver each as a prize for the best male and females of “Blenheim Spaniels of the old type, as shown in pictures of Charles II of England’s time, long face, no stop, flat skull, not inclined to be domed, with spot in center of skull.”The Second World War caused a drastic setback to the emerging breed, with the vast majority of breeding stock destroyed because of wartime hardship and food shortages. For instance, in the Ttiweh Cavalier Kennel, the population of sixty dogs dropped to three during the 1940s.The history of the breed in America is relatively recent. The first recorded Cavalier living in the United States was brought from the United Kingdom in 1956 by W. Lyon Brown, together with Elizabeth Spalding and other enthusiasts, she founded the Cavalier King Charles Club USA that continues to the present day. In 1994, the American Cavalier King Charles Spaniel Club was created by a group of breeders to apply for recognition by the American Kennel Club. The Cavalier would go on to be recognized by the American Kennel Club in 1995,

Description[edit]

Historically the Cavalier King Charles Spaniel was a lap dog and is small for a spaniel, with fully grown adults comparable in size to adolescents of other larger spaniel breeds. Breed standards state that height of a Cavalier should be between 12 to 13 inches (30 to 33 cm) with a proportionate weight between 13 to 18 pounds (5.9 to 8.2 kg). The tail is usually not docked,The Cavalier King Charles Spaniel and the English Toy Spaniel can often be confused with each other. In the United Kingdom, the English Toy Spaniel is called the King Charles Spaniel, while in the United States, one of the colours of the Toy Spaniel is known as King Charles. The two breeds share similar history and only diverged from each other about 100 years ago. There are several major differences between the two breeds, with the primary difference being size. While the Cavalier weighs on average between 13 to 18 pounds (5.9 to 8.2 kg), the King Charles is smaller at 9 to 15 pounds (4.1 to 6.8 kg). In addition, their facial features, while similar, are different; the Cavalier’s ears are set higher and its skull is flat, while the King Charles’s skull is domed. Finally, the muzzle length of the Cavalier tends to be longer than that of its King Charles cousin.

Colour[edit]

The breed has four recognized colours. Cavaliers that have rich chestnut markings on a pearly white background are known as Blenheim in honor of Blenheim Palace, where John Churchill, 1st Duke of Marlborough raised for assistance in hunting the predecessors to the Cavalier breed in this particular colour. In some Blenheim dogs there is a chestnut spot in the middle of the forehead: this is called the “Blenheim” spot.Black and Tan are dogs with black bodies with tan highlights, particularly eyebrows, cheeks, legs and beneath the tail.Ruby Cavaliers should be entirely chestnut all over,The fourth colour is known as Tricolour, which is black and white with tan markings on cheeks, inside ears, on eyebrows, inside legs, and on underside of tail.

Popularity[edit]

According to statistics released by The Kennel Club, Cavaliers were the 6th most popular dog in the United Kingdom in 2007 with 11,422 registrations in a single year. Labrador Retrievers were the most popular with 45,079 registrations in that year.

Temperament[edit]

The breed is highly affectionate, playful, extremely patient and eager to please. As such, dogs of the breed are good with children and other dogs.Cavaliers are active and sporting. Cavaliers are successful in conformation shows, obedience and agility and they also make wonderful therapy dogs due to their sweet, gentle natures.They have an instinct to chase most things that move including vehicles on busy streets, and so most Cavaliers will never become “street-wise”.The Cavalier’s coat requires weekly brushing, but no trimming.

Health[edit]

Cavaliers can notably be prone to mitral valve disease, which leads to heart failure. This appears in many Cavaliers at some point in their lives and is the most common cause of death. Some serious genetic health problems, including early-onset mitral valve disease (MVD), the potentially severely painful syringomyelia (SM), hip dysplasia, luxating patellas, and certain vision and hearing disorders are health problems for this breed.

Mitral valve disease[edit]

Nearly all Cavaliers eventually have mitral valve disease, with heart murmurs that may progressively worsen, leading to heart failure. This condition is polygenic (affected by multiple genes), and therefore all lines of Cavaliers worldwide are susceptible. It is the leading cause of death in the breed. A survey by The Kennel Club of the United Kingdom showed that 42.8% of Cavalier deaths are cardiac related. The next most common causes are cancer (12.3%) and old age (12.2%).Veterinary geneticists and cardiologists have developed breeding guidelines to eliminate early-onset mitral valve disease in the breed, but it is unclear if a statistically significant number of breeders follow these guidelines.

Syringomyelia[edit]

Syringomyelia (SM) is a condition affecting the brain and spine, causing symptoms ranging from mild discomfort to severe pain and partial paralysis. It is caused by a malformation, commonly known as Chiari Malformation, in the lower back of the skull that reduces the space available to the brain, compressing it and often forcing it out (herniating it) through the opening into the spinal cord. This blocks the flow of cerebral spinal fluid (CSF) around the brain and spine and increases the fluid’s pressure, creating turbulence that in turn is believed to create fluid pockets, or syrinxes (hence the term syringomyelia), in the spinal cord. Syringomyelia is rare in most breeds but has become widespread in the Cavalier King Charles Spaniel, with international research samples in the past few years consistently showing over 90% of Cavaliers have the malformation, and that between 30–70% have syrinxes.Not all dogs with SM show scratching behavior. Not all dogs who show scratching behavior appear to be in pain, though several leading researchers, including Dr Clare Rusbridge in the UK and Drs Curtis Dewey and Dominic Marino in the US, believe scratching in SM cavaliers is a sign of pain and discomfort and of existing neurological damage to the dorsal horn region of the spine. If onset is at an early age, a first sign may be scratching and/or rapidly appearing scoliosis. If the problem is severe, there is likely to be poor proprioception (awareness of body position), especially with regard to the forelimbs. Clumsiness and falling results from this problem. Progression is variable though the majority of dogs showing symptoms by age four tend to see progression of the condition.A veterinarian will rule out basic causes of scratching or discomfort such as ear mites, fleas, and allergies, and then, primary secretory otitis media (PSOM – glue ear), as well as spinal or limb injuries, before assuming that a Cavalier has SM. PSOM can present similar symptoms but is much easier and cheaper to treat.

Episodic Falling (EF)[edit]

Episodic Falling causes “exercise-induced paroxysmal hypertonicity” meaning that there is increased muscle tone in the dog and the muscles cannot relax. Previously thought to be a muscular disorder, it is now known to be neurological. EF is caused by a single recessive gene, and a genetic test is available.

Thrombocytopenia and macrothrombocytopenia[edit]

As many as half of all Cavalier King Charles Spaniels may have a congenital blood disorder called idiopathic asymptomatic thrombocytopenia, an abnormally low number of platelets in the blood, according to recent studies in Denmark and the United States. Platelets, or thrombocytes, are disk-shaped blood elements thataid in blood clotting. Excessively low numbers are the most common cause of bleeding disorders in dogs. The platelets in the blood of many Cavalier King Charles Spaniels are a combination of those of normal size for dogs and others that are abnormally oversized, or macrothrombocytes. Macrothrombocytosis also is a congenital abnormality found in at least a third of CKCSs. These large platelets function normally, and the typical Cavalier does not appear to experience any health problems due to either the size or fewer numbers of its platelets.

Hip and knee disorders[edit]

Hip dysplasia is a common genetic disease that affects Cavalier King Charles Spaniels. It is not present at birth but develops with age. Hip dysplasia is diagnosed by X-rays, but it is not usually evident in X-rays of Cavaliers until they mature. Even in adult spaniels with severe hip dysplasia, X-rays may not always indicate the disease.Cavaliers can be subject to a genetic defect of the femur and knee called luxating patella. This condition is most often observed when a puppy is 4 to 6 months old. In the most serious cases, surgery may be indicated. The grading system for the patella runs from 1 (a tight knee), to 4 (a knee so loose that its cap is easily displaced). If a cavalier has a grade 1–2, physical rehabilitation therapy and exercise may reduce the grading and potentially avoid surgery. The grades 3–4 are most severe where surgery will most likely be needed to correct the problem to avoid the development of arthritis and lameness in the limb.

Eye problems[edit]

A disorder commonly found in Cavaliers is keratoconjunctivitis sicca, colloquially known as “dry eye”. The usual cause of this condition is an autoimmune reaction against the dog’s lacrimal gland (tear gland), reducing the production of tears. According to the Canine Inherited Disorders Database, the condition requires continual treatment and if untreated may result in partial or total blindness.A 1999 study of Cavaliers conducted by the Canine Eye Registration Foundation showed that an average of 30% of all Cavalier King Charles Spaniels evaluated had eye problems.

Ear disorders[edit]

Primary Secretory Otitis Media (PSOM), also known as glue ear, consists of a highly viscous mucus plug that fills the dog’s middle ear and may cause the tympanic membrane to bulge. PSOM has been reported almost exclusively in Cavaliers, and it may affect over half of them. Because the pain and other sensations in the head and neck areas, resulting from PSOM, are similar to some symptoms caused by syringomyelia (SM), some examining veterinarians have mis-diagnosed SM in Cavaliers that actually have PSOM and not SM.Cavalier King Charles Spaniels may be predisposed to a form of congenital deafness, which is present at birth, due to a lack of formation or early degeneration of receptors in the inner ear, although this is relatively rare. In addition, more recent studies have found Cavaliers that develop a progressive hearing loss, which usually begins during puppy-hood and progresses until the dog is completely deaf, usually between the ages of three and five years. The progressive nature of this form of deafness in Cavaliers is believed to be caused by degeneration of the hearing nerve rather than the lack of formation or early degeneration of the inner ear receptors.

Urban legend[edit]

An urban legend claims that Charles II issued a special decree granting King Charles Spaniels permission to enter any establishment in the UK,The UK Parliament website states: “Contrary to popular rumor, there is no Act of Parliament referring to King Charles spaniels being allowed anywhere in the Palace of Westminster. We are often asked this question and have thoroughly researched it.”

See also[edit]

References[edit]