King Cavalier Cocker Spaniel?

“Sputnik is a sassy 2-year-old female Cockalier. She has a sweet and playful disposition, but she really loves sitting on laps and getting her belly rubbed. She is very intelligent and can easily sense moods and emotions. Sputnik is very gentle; however, she enjoys playing with other dogs, regardless of size. She is a wonderful companion and constantly gets attention from everyone who comes into contact with her.”

Regal the Cockalier at 4 months old “She is healthy, sweet, and easy to train because of her high intelligence and eager submissive compliance.

How much is a Cavalier King cocker spaniel?

Cavalier King Charles Spaniels cost about the same as most small breeds. The average price is around $1,500 for a high-quality puppy from a recognized breeder. However, you can find them ranging from $1,000 to $2,500. Of course, where you purchase them from matters.

What is the difference between a cocker spaniel and a King Charles Cavalier?

You can differentiate between these two breeds by their size. Cavalier King Charles spaniels are slightly shorter and lighter than their cocker cousins, measuring between 12 and 13 inches to the shoulders and weighing in at between 13 and 18 pounds.

Are Cavalier King Charles Spaniels good pets?

Personality: The Cavalier King Charles spaniel is an enchantingly affectionate, playful, intelligent dog that eagerly indulges its guardians with endearing devotion. … These happy little dogs are excellent with children, and their desire to interact with their guardians makes them pleasurable household companions.

Do cavalier cocker spaniels shed?

The medium-length silky coat is not so heavy that it requires hours of brushing, and it sheds dirt easily. The Cavalier sheds, like all dogs, but regular brushing will remove dead hairs so they don’t float off onto your floor, furniture and clothing.

The Cavalier King Charles Spaniel wears his connection to British history in his breeds name. Cavaliers are the best of two worlds, combining the gentle attentiveness of a toy breed with the verve and athleticism of a sporting spaniel.

The Cockalier is a mixed breed dog a cross between the Cavalier King Charles Spaniel and Cocker Spaniel dog breeds. Friendly, gentle, and intelligent, these pups inherited some of the best traits from both of their parents.

Breed isn’t the only factor that goes into affection levels; dogs who were raised inside a home with people around feel more comfortable with humans and bond more easily. Mouthy dogs are more likely to use their mouths to hold or “herd” their human family members, and they need training to learn that it’s fine to gnaw on chew toys, but not on people.

Mouthy breeds tend to really enjoy a game of fetch, as well as a good chew on a toy that’s been stuffed with kibble and treats. These breeds generally aren’t a good fit for homes with smaller pets that can look like prey, such as cats, hamsters, or small dogs. Originally bred to perform a canine job of some sort, such as retrieving game for hunters or herding livestock, they have the stamina to put in a full workday.

When picking a breed, consider your own activity level and lifestyle, and think about whether you’ll find a frisky, energetic dog invigorating or annoying. While the Cockalier can be fine living in an apartment situation, remember that this is an active dog who will need regular brisk walks and play sessions. This dog wants to be around people and become a key part of your family, whether that means embarking on long afternoon walks together or snuggling up on the couch to relax.

Cockaliers are generally considered to be healthy dogs, although the breed can be predisposed to some of the same conditions that the Cavalier King Charles Spaniel and Chihuahua face. Cockaliers need to stick to a heathy diet as overeating can cause weight gain and associated health problems, especially if adequate exercise isn’t offered.

The Cavalier King Charles Spaniel is an elegant, royal, toy spaniel, slightly longer than tall, with moderate bones. The Cav retains the build of a working spaniel, yet in a smaller version. Their gait is free and elegant, with good reach and drive. Their silky coat is of moderate length, with a slight wave permissible. Long feathering on the feet is a breed characteristic. A hallmark of the breed is its gentle, sweet, melting expression.

These Tudor lapdogs, known as comforter spaniels, served as lap and foot warmers, and even surrogate hot water bottles. In addition, they served the vital function of attracting fleas from their owners bodies!

In the 1700s, King Charles II was so enamored with his toy spaniels that he was accused of ignoring matters of state in favor of his dogs. After his death, the Duke of Marlborough took over as the major advocate of the breed; the red and white Blenheim color, which was his favorite, is named after his estate. The King Charles Spaniel continued to grace the homes of the wealthy for generations, but with time a shorter-nosed dog was preferred.

A twist of fate occurred when a wealthy American, Roswell Eldridge, came to England and offered outlandish prize money for the best pointed-nosed spaniels, most resembling the old type. Breeders bred their old-type dogs together in an effort to gain the prize, and in so doing, many came to appreciate the old type. Ironically, these dogs, named Cavalier King Charles Spaniels in honor of the Cavalier King, eventually outstripped their short-nosed counterparts in popularity, becoming one of the most popular breeds in England.

They were slower to catch on in America, and many Cavalier owners fought AKC recognition in an effort to control the problems that so often accompany popularity. The Cavalier in many ways fits the bill as an ideal house pet. Outdoors, his spaniel heritage kicks in, and he loves to explore, sniff, and chase.

The Cavalier needs a fair amount of exercise every day, either in the form of a moderate walk on leash or a romp in a safe area. Major concerns: mitral valve insufficiency, CHD, syringomelia Minor concerns: patellar luxation, entropion Occasionally seen: retinal dysplasia Suggested tests: cardiac, hip, knee, eye Life span: 914 years Note: While the characteristics mentioned here may frequently represent this breed, dogs are individuals whose personalities and appearances will vary.

Cockalier

The Cockalier is a mixed breed dog — a cross between the Cavalier King Charles Spaniel and Cocker Spaniel dog breeds. Friendly, gentle, and intelligent, these pups inherited some of the best traits from both of their parents.You may find these mixed breed dogs in shelters and breed specific rescues, so remember to always adopt! Don’t shop if you’re looking to add one of these dogs to your home!The Cockalier is one of the most affectionate and loving mixed dog breeds around. They are loving and loyal and will quickly form lifelong bonds with any humans who show them love and kindness. They are intelligent and usually take well to training, making them an ideal option for first time dog owners.While Cockaliers are high energy canines, they can also adapt to living in apartments or smaller spaces — as long as enough exercise is provided. If you’ve looking for a loyal and loving dog with a great temperament, definitely consider adopting one of these pups.See below for all mixed dog breed traits and facts about Cockaliers!

History

As its name implies, the Cavalier King Charles Spaniel is derived from spaniel roots. The European toy dogs were probably the result of breeding small spaniels to Oriental toy breeds such as the Japanese Chin and perhaps the Tibetan Spaniel. These Tudor lapdogs, known as “comforter spaniels,” served as lap and foot warmers, and even surrogate hot water bottles. In addition, they served the vital function of attracting fleas from their owners’ bodies! The toy spaniels became especially popular because they appealed to all members of the family.In the 1700s, King Charles II was so enamored with his toy spaniels that he was accused of ignoring matters of state in favor of his dogs. The dogs were so closely associated with him that they became known as King Charles Spaniels. After his death, the Duke of Marlborough took over as the major advocate of the breed; the red and white “Blenheim” color, which was his favorite, is named after his estate. The King Charles Spaniel continued to grace the homes of the wealthy for generations, but with time a shorter-nosed dog was preferred.By the early 1900s, the few dogs that resembled the early members of the breed were considered to be inferior. A twist of fate occurred when a wealthy American, Roswell Eldridge, came to England and offered outlandish prize money for the best “pointed-nosed” spaniels, most resembling the old type. Breeders bred their old-type dogs together in an effort to gain the prize, and in so doing, many came to appreciate the old type. Ironically, these dogs, named Cavalier King Charles Spaniels in honor of the Cavalier King, eventually outstripped their short-nosed counterparts in popularity, becoming one of the most popular breeds in England. They were slower to catch on in America, and many Cavalier owners fought AKC recognition in an effort to control the problems that so often accompany popularity. In 1996, the AKC recognized the Cavalier. Its popularity continues to grow.

Temperament

The Cavalier in many ways fits the bill as an ideal house pet. He is sweet, gentle, playful, willing to please, affectionate, and quiet. He equally enjoys sharing time on the couch or on a walk. He neither digs nor barks excessively. He is amiable toward other dogs, pets, and strangers. Outdoors, his spaniel heritage kicks in, and he loves to explore, sniff, and chase.

Upkeep

The Cavalier needs a fair amount of exercise every day, either in the form of a moderate walk on leash or a romp in a safe area. His long coat needs brushing every other day.

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