Kidney Disease in Dogs?

The kidneys have many functions. They principally act to remove waste products from the blood stream, regulate the levels of certain essential minerals such potassium and sodium, conserve water, and produce urine.

After approximately 2/3 of the kidney tissue is destroyed, there is a rapid rise in waste products in the bloodstream and an apparent sudden onset of severe disease. The clinical signs of more advanced kidney failure include loss of appetite, depression, vomiting, diarrhea, and very bad breath.

If a major stress such as illness or surgery occurs, the kidneys may fail, sending the blood test values up quickly. This flushing process is called diuresis and helps mildly damaged kidney cells to function again by removing the toxic metabolites and creating a healthier environment for healing. Other important aspects of initial treatment include proper nutrition and medication to control vomiting and diarrhea if present.

The ideal diet for a dog in the advanced stages of kidney failure is lower in protein, low in phosphorus, and is not acidified. This type of diet helps reduce the amount of protein wastes or metabolic toxins that may make your pet feel sick and lethargic. Nutritionists have developed commercial therapeutic diets that are designed for treating various stages of chronic kidney disease.

Certain drugs will bind excess phosphates in the intestinal tract so they are not absorbed into the bloodstream, resulting in lower blood levels of phosphorus. This serves to prevent dehydration, helps continually flush toxins from the kidneys and provides additional levels of electrolytes. Therefore, many dogs in kidney failure will be unable to produce erythropoietin and have anemia or a low red blood cell count.

Synthetic erythropoietin may stimulate the bone marrow to make red blood cells and correct the anemia in most dogs. Treatment and follow-up care is relatively easy and inexpensive and extending the length and quality of life for their faithful companion represents the ultimate reward for many clients.

How long do dogs live with kidney disease?

It’s best if some treatments are started when the pet is at a specific stage of chronic kidney disease. Median survival time for dogs in Stage 1 is more than 400 days, while Stage 2 ranged from 200 to 400 days and Stage 3 ranged from 110 to 200 days.

What are the early signs of kidney failure in dogs?

Significant weight loss..Vomiting..Pale gums..Drunken behavior or uncoordinated movement such as stumbling..Breath that smells like chemicals..Significant decrease in appetite..Increase or decrease in water consumption..Increase or decrease in volume of urine.

How do dogs act when their kidneys are failing?

The clinical signs of more advanced kidney failure include loss of appetite, depression, vomiting, diarrhea, and very bad breath. Occasionally, ulcers will be found in the mouth.

Is a dog in pain when it has kidney failure?

When the kidneys become damaged, whether through an infection, poisoning, or some other event, a pet can experience vomiting, appetite loss, frequent urination, back or abdominal pain, and other symptoms.

Kidney disease is very common in dogs, and protecting your pooch from kidney disease means you should be prepared to look for problems early. Studies show that 1 in 10 dogs suffer from kidney disease, reports Dr. Celeste Clements. Dogs can get kidney disease for any number of underlying reasons, and even worse, its often difficult to spot. Some of the earliest signs of kidney disease in dogs may include subtle weight loss, urinating/peeing more often and drinking a lot more water. Therefore, if you notice your dog is peeing on the floor or asking to go out more, or if your dog is always thirsty, its time to visit your veterinarian.

Some of the earliest signs of kidney disease in dogs may include subtle weight loss , urinating/peeing more often and drinking a lot more water . Unfortunately, sometimes once these signs are present, theres typically already been a great deal of kidney damage.

Fortunately, new advances in the veterinary world are making it easier to find kidney disease in dogs earlier (even without signs being present). Kidney disease is a leading cause of suffering and death in pets, 3 and has been so difficult to combat because it was often not detected until most of the damage was done and permanent. Certain factors like kidney stones , urinary tract infections , or other infections , including Lyme disease , or hereditary conditions could make kidney disease more likely.

3 [Editors Note: IDEXX Laboratories is the parent company of Pet Health Network.] Check out the resources below, and ask your veterinarian what you can be doing to keep your dog healthier, happier and in your life longer.

Renal failure (also referred to as kidney failure) can be caused by many conditions that negatively affect the health and functioning of the kidneys and its related organs.

This type of infection can cause the kidneys to become inflamed and renal cells to be destroyed. The elevation of blood waste product and abnormalities in urine, including the presence of protein, can indicate the severity of chronic kidney disease.

Its best if some treatments are started when the pet is at a specific stage of chronic kidney disease. Median survival time for Stage 4 kidney disease ranges from 14 to 80 days, according to IRIS. Signs of chronic disease in dogs can vary from subtle and slowly progressive to severe.

Drinking too much and producing large volumes of urine General depression associated with elevation of waste products in blood Overall weakness caused by low potassium in the blood Increased volume of urine in the bladder By the time a dog experiences renal failure, the disease has advanced and you may notice such signs as: Blood in urine Lethargy Pale gums Ulcers in the mouth Intestinal seizures Significant weight loss Drunken behavior or uncoordinated movement such as stumbling Significant decrease in appetite Breath that smells like chemicals Vomiting

Factors to be considered may include the type of renal failure your dog may be experiencing, the extend of loss of function in the kidneys, progression of the condition and its underlying causes. Your veterinarian will perform diagnostic blood and urine tests to detect the presence of any abnormalities. While a diagnosis of renal disease or failure can usually be made based on physical examination, in addition to the blood and urine tests.

Aggressive treatments may include hospitalization for fluid therapy, dialysis or a kidney transplant. As your dog progresses through stages of renal disease, survival time is likely to grow shorter. Your dogs initial response to conservative therapy may be relatively slow it may take weeks or months to see progress.

Kidney failure is also referred to as renal failure, and can be caused by a number of diseases that can impact the kidneys and related organs. Healthy kidneys are supposed to eliminate toxins, regulate hydration, maintain a normal electrolyte balance and release hormones required to produce red blood cells.

If the loss of kidney function is gradual (over weeks, months or years), its referred to as chronic renal failure. The bacteria can enter the blood stream and attack multiple organs, causing irreversible damage to the kidneys in addition to the heart and liver.

Congenital disease – This category can include underlying illnesses and hereditary conditions – everything from agenesis (being born without one or both kidneys) to cysts. Acute kidney failure can make dogs very sick and may need to be treated in the hospital, in intensive care. Your vet may be able to treat milder cases with fluids, antibiotics and medications on an outpatient schedule.

With chronic kidney failure, vets generally focus on slowing down the diseases progression and looking at ways to improve quality of life for the patient. Nausea, fluid imbalances, blood pressure fluctuations and other symptoms will need to be treated, usually with medication and changes to diet. Your vet may also recommend specific nutrients, nutritional supplements or a therapeutic diet to manage the condition.

Take inventory of your house and remove potential toxins such as antifreeze (the chemical ethylene glycol is toxic to dogs) and put medications and other foods or substances out of reach. However, keeping up with regular physical exams and annual wellness checkups will increase the chances any problems will be detected early.

What do my dog’s kidneys do?

The kidneys have many functions. They principally act to remove waste products from the blood stream, regulate the levels of certain essential minerals such potassium and sodium, conserve water, and produce urine.