Is Pomegranate Good for Dogs?

Pomegranates and dogs have a rocky relationship. When the fruit is measured out and cooked into high quality dog food by professionals, its totally fine for canines. But, if your dog snatches a raw pomegranate from the counter and devours it, seeds and all, get ready for some vomit and diarrhea clean up.

Pomegranate season in North America begins around October and runs through February (just like citrus fruits), which means theyre often incorporated into tablescapes and recipes . However, that study only looked at six dogs , hardly a large enough sample size to determine any real data on the fruits effect on canines in general.

If you catch your pup red-handed gobbling down an entire raw pomegranate, its a good idea to call your vet or Animal Poison Control .

Why pomegranate is bad for dogs?

However, this exotic fruit is known to make dogs sick. Eating some of the fruit seeds from a pomegranate may give your dog a tummy ache and/or cause vomiting. Dogs aren’t able to digest seeds and fruits as effectively as humans which could be one reason pomegranates cause issues for pups who eat them.

Will pomegranates hurt dogs?

Pomegranate. Arils, the seeds of pomegranates, are almost impossible for dogs to digest, and can cause serious problems if eaten in large amounts. Most commonly, if your pup gets ahold of some of this fruit, they will vomit, and be fine, but if you are worried, definitely take them to the vet for a visit.

What part of a pomegranate is poisonous?

The root, stem, or peel of pomegranate is POSSIBLY UNSAFE when taken by mouth in large amounts. The root, stem, and peel contain poisons.

Is it safe to give pomegranate?

Pomegranate seeds are different from the arils, which are the sweet, juice-filled pulps that this fruit is known for. The seeds themselves appear to be perfectly edible. They are a good source of antioxidants, insoluble fiber, and punicic acid.

If you feel like youre seeing pomegranates popping up everywhere these days, youre onto something. Though humans have enjoyed the tart taste and health benefits of pomegranates for millennia (fun fact: scholars believe pomegranates were one of the first fruits ever cultivated), now the nutrient-packed fruit is gaining popularity as an ingredient in dog food and treats, too.

The leaves are not edible for dogs and can contain high levels of toxins, notes Dr. Cristine Hayes, medical director at ASPCA Animal Poison Control Center. All parts of the fruit (skin, flesh, and seeds) are rich in polyphenols (compounds packed with antioxidants), which is why you might be interested in sharing some pomegranate with your pup.

Adds Luisana, The seeds themselves are generally safe in moderation and a good source of naturally occurring antioxidants (such as vitamin C and polyphenols) and fiber. Overall, pomegranate contains antioxidants, which are frequently used in the formulation of dog food and dietary supplements to support health and reduce inflammation, according to Hayes. Extracts have been studied as a treatment for canine oral health issues ( 2 ), such as halitosis (also known as stinky dog breath).

If you plan to feed your pup any pomegranate, always check to ensure that it is fresh and that it has an acceptable sugar content, especially if your dog has diabetes. So finding the appropriate amount for your pup depends on several factors, including their size and whether they have a history of digestive tract disease. Especially when introducing a new food to a pet, I recommend starting small and monitoring closely for any negative side effects, notes Luisana.

Pomegranates originated throughout the Mediterranean region and have been cultivated since ancient times. The fruit is high in vitamin C, potassium, folic acid, and fiber. Pomegranates are also rich in antioxidants and often considered a superfood. Though pomegranates are super healthy for humans, dogs dont necessarily benefit from these nutrients in the same way.

Signs your dog has an intestinal obstruction include vomiting, decreased appetite, and constipation due to the inability to pass food through the digestive system.

If you’re busy planning holiday meal prep and thinking of all the recipes in which you’ll use the juicy, pearl-like pomegranate fruit, you may wonder if your dog can eat a pomegranate seed or two. But hold those jewel-tone seeds! The relationship between dogs and pomegranate is complicated.

“Having a seed or two is not likely a big deal but if you catch your dog eating a whole pomegranate, I would highly recommend contacting your vet for advice and evaluation right away,” says Dr. Aziza Glass, a Freshpet expert and veterinarian based in Houston, Texas. “All parts of the fruit including the skin, flesh, and seeds are high in vitamin C, potassium, folic acid, fiber, and antioxidants making it great for humans,” says Dr. Glass.

What are pomegranates?

Pomegranates come from the Lythraceae plant family. This family is not toxic to dogs, according to the ASPCA. Pomegranate season in North America begins around October and runs through February (just like citrus fruits), which means they’re often incorporated into tablescapes and recipes. The fruit is known for its juicy seeds and superfruit status. It’s full of vitamin C, vitamin K and fiber.

Not fatal for dogs

Technically, the seeds of a pomegranate are not poisonous to dogs the way some other foods are. It would be highly unlikely for your dog to experience organ failure or death after ingesting this fruit. Unlike raisins or grapes, which could lead to kidney failure if eaten in large quantities, pomegranates will usually only cause digestive issues. Chances are your dog will throw up the pomegranate on his own.Similar to acorns, pomegranate seeds contain tannins. Tannins can cause stomach issues in canines that tend to result in vomit and diarrhea. A pomegranate peel is also a choking hazard, so if you’re whipping up some pomegranate ginger apple cider, be sure to toss those peels straight into the garbage.

Pomegranate in dog food

Some dog food brands, like Farmina, incorporate pomegranate into their recipes. Farmina’s Grain-Free Chicken and Pomegranate Dry Food contains dried pomegranate. The Italian company clearly does their research—you can read tons of scientific studies on their website regarding their ingredient choices.In a study not associated with Farmina, pomegranate peel extract was found to promote healthy gut bacteria and digestion in dogs. However, that study only looked at six dogs, hardly a large enough sample size to determine any real data on the fruit’s effect on canines in general.Again, if professionals have formulated a dog food recipe with pomegranates that your pup enjoys and benefits from, go for it! If not, we recommend avoiding the fruit.

Signs your dog has eaten pomegranate

If you suspect your pup stole some pomegranate off your fancy charcuterie board, watch him closely for a few hours. Make sure he has plenty of water (and encourage him to drink it). Chances are he’ll throw up the forbidden fruit on his own. Keep in mind, every dog’s constitution is different. Similar to the way some humans respond well to lactose and others have trouble processing it, some dogs may develop upset tummies after ingesting pomegranate, while others will not.

Skip To

If you feel like you’re seeing pomegranates popping up everywhere these days, you’re onto something. Though humans have enjoyed the tart taste and health benefits of pomegranates for millennia (fun fact: scholars believe pomegranates were one of the first fruits ever cultivated), now the nutrient-packed fruit is gaining popularity as an ingredient in dog food and treats, too.“Pomegranate is not a common ingredient, but is becoming a more popular trend,” says Dr. Emily Townsend Luisana, veterinarian and clinical nutrition fellow at BluePearl Veterinary Specialty Hospital of the Carolinas.But does that mean the next time you scoop out some delicious, deep red pomegranate seeds, you should offer some to your dog, too? If you’ve ever wondered, “Can dogs eat pomegranates?” or “Is pomegranate safe for dogs?” keep reading to find out if your dog can benefit from this superfruit, too.

Can Dogs Eat Pomegranate?

First, if you’re looking for a clean-cut, yes-or-no answer on whether pomegranates are safe for dogs, a quick anatomy lesson on the fruit will tell you it’s not that simple. Pomegranates contain many different parts, and not all of them may be pet-friendly.“Pomegranate (All parts of the fruit (skin, flesh, and seeds) are rich in polyphenols (compounds packed with antioxidants), which is why you might be interested in sharing some pomegranate with your pup. But not all parts should be eaten.“Although they are technically edible, the skin and flesh are poorly digestible and pose a risk for a digestive tract obstruction,” says Hayes. “The skin can be used in the production of pomegranate extract, which is used in dietary supplements and food. The seeds and juice within the seeds are edible for dogs, although large quantities of seeds can cause digestive upset, and since they don’t break down easily, they can also cause a digestive tract blockage.”Adds Luisana, “The seeds themselves are generally safe in moderation and a good source of naturally occurring antioxidants (such as vitamin C and polyphenols) and fiber.”

Are Pomegranates Bad for Dogs?

There are a number of research studies on the benefits of pomegranates for dogs, which is why you are increasingly likely to find pomegranate or pomegranate extract in dog foods, treats, and canine dietary supplements promoting wellness and joint health. Overall, pomegranate contains antioxidants, which are frequently used in the formulation of dog food and dietary supplements to support health and reduce inflammation, according to Hayes. Here are a few examples of pomegranate’s benefits:Additionally, pomegranate has been suggested as a natural product for use in treating diarrhea and digestive tract parasites. However, there are no good studies evaluating the use of pomegranate for these conditions in dogs, notes Hayes.

Can Dogs Eat Pomegranate?

Yes, but it’s complicated.If you’re busy planning holiday meal prep and thinking of all the recipes in which you’ll use the juicy, pearl-like pomegranate fruit, you may wonder if your dog can eat a pomegranate seed or two. But hold those jewel-tone seeds! The relationship between dogs and pomegranate is complicated.Raw pomegranate isn’t toxic to dogs, but it can make them sick. “Eating more than a few of the seeds or any of the peel can cause digestive issues like vomiting, diarrhea, and abdominal pain,” says Dr. Chyrle Bonk, a veterinarian and consultant with PetKeen.com, a pet advice site.”That’s because dogs aren’t as set up to digest these high fiber foods. Also, pomegranate contains tannins which can make a dog sick to their stomach,” Dr. Bonk says. What’s more, though the seeds are small, a dog could choke if he ate a handful quickly.

What are Tannins?

Tannins are complex chemical substances derived from phenolic acids that are found in some fruits and trees. Dogs can react to the tannins in pomegranate, and it can cause vomiting and diarrhea due to how their stomach reacts to the compound.”Having a seed or two is not likely a big deal but if you catch your dog eating a whole pomegranate, I would highly recommend contacting your vet for advice and evaluation right away,” says Dr. Aziza Glass, a Freshpet expert and veterinarian based in Houston, Texas.

Aren’t Pomegranates Good for Us?

“All parts of the fruit including the skin, flesh, and seeds are high in vitamin C, potassium, folic acid, fiber, and antioxidants making it great for humans,” says Dr. Glass. But, dogs may not receive the same benefits, she says.