Is Lemon Good for Dogs?

Like cats getting scared of cucumbers (an act experts advise against doing to your cat), the latest viral phenomenon among some pet parents is giving their dogs or puppies a taste of a lemon. Videos capturing dogs wincing at the fruit are circling social websites, and theyre leaving a bitter taste with some concerned pet parents. While some animal advocates see the clips as cruel, others are wondering if it is unsafe for dogs to eat lemons as well.

Lemon juice has no nutritional benefit for dogs and can cause stomach upset leading to vomiting and diarrhea, says Panning.

What happens if a dog eats lemon?

Too much lemon juice can irritate your dog’s stomach due to the high levels of citric acid. Your pup may experience vomiting or diarrhea as a result. … If your dog has eaten a lot of lemons, contact your vet or animal poison control. They will tell you what you need to do and if your pup should be seen.

Can dogs have lemon in their water?

If you see your pup panting after a rousing game of fetch, you may wonder if he can enjoy the same benefits. After all, it tastes so good and provides vitamin C, albeit a small amount. The short answer is no, they can’t. Lemon contains a few potentially toxic ingredients that can do more harm than good for your dog.

Is lemon flavoring OK for dogs?

No. For one thing, dogs don’t enjoy the taste of sour citrus fruits like lemons and limes. But the psoralen compounds and aromatic oils in lemons are toxic to dogs and can cause an upset stomach.

Giving your dog a lemon slice – is it a funny prank or animal abuse? One YouTube compilation from 2018 features almost 12 minutes of dogs vs.lemons and has over 600K views and there are many more that will come up if you do a quick search. Some people find this funny to watch dogs making faces or swatting away the lemon as the sourness hits their taste buds, but should they be laughing? Is this a harmless prank or cruel punishment? The answer is a little more complicated.

Not only are lemons not a suitable snack for your pup, but you should also avoid sharing any other citrus fruit with your dog including grapefruits and limes as well. Some people use lemon juice as a deterrent for puppies so they dont chew on things they shouldnt or a punishment for being naughty.

No. For one thing, dogs dont enjoy the taste of sour citrus fruits like lemons and limes. But the psoralen compounds and aromatic oils in lemons are toxic to dogs and can cause an upset stomach.

While lemons aren’t necessarily deadly for dogs (like other fruits can be), the psoralen compounds and aromatic oils in lemons are toxic enough for your pup that you can expect upset stomachs, dizziness, and even unusual sensitivity to light. Though dogs most likely won’t eat lemons on their own – the sour smell and taste are enough to throw your dog off the hunt for food – it is possible they will gobble one up – especially if they are young and curious.

Your pup might also face things like system depression, unusual light sensitivity, and other neurological symptoms – but that would be after quite a lot of lemon per body weight of the dog. Panting Ears drop Drooling Lack of focus Back hair on edge Pupils dilated

Dermatitis Inability to walk or stand Muscle tremors or shakes Drooling GI distress Lack of appetite Vomiting Diarrhea When it comes to training dogs, people have often resorted to using lemon juice as a bitter, sour, punishment for their pups. If your dog associates a bad taste in their mouth with the behavior that put them there in the first place, they likely won’t continue this behavior.Dozens of sites on the internet claim that mixing up a solution of vinegar and lemon juice can be the ultimate spray to keep your dog’s bad behaviors at bay, but unfortunately, this is a dangerous mistake.

Lemon juice – sans the skin – is still dangerous, as the high acidity can upset your pup’s GI system significantly. Various internet sources will boast about the benefits of lemon essential oils for battling external parasites, but it should be noted that essential oils are simply concentrated lemon, and it’s never safe for your dog to ingest them due to the highly concentrated psoralens. Lemons, as well as other citrus fruits, are toxic to dogs and can be incredibly dangerous if eaten in large qualities.

A good starting point for this is to ensure your dog can follow basic obedience commands .

Can Dogs Eat Lemons?

Technically, yes, but only very small amounts. Even then, it can cause GI distress, says Cassie Panning, a certified veterinary technician at the University of Minnesota’s College of Veterinary Medicine. “For practical purposes, lemons are not terribly dangerous unless eaten in large quantities,” she said.

Are Lemons Toxic to Dogs?

No, but the acidic fruit can cause upset stomach, vomiting, weakness and diarrhea if large quantities are ingested. Large quantities can cause other issues, too. “Depending on the dog and amount eaten, a large piece of peel could cause obstruction of the GI tract, which is an emergency,” says Amy Farcas, DVM, MS, DACVN, of Veterinary Nutrition Care.

Can Dogs Have Lemon Juice?

Lemon juice has no nutritional benefit for dogs and can cause stomach upset leading to vomiting and diarrhea,” says Panning. She also warns that since lemon juice is very acidic, it presents a higher risk of disrupting a dog’s acid base balance.

Are lemons good for dogs?

In a word, no – they aren’t good for dogs. Lemons don’t have any nutritional value and the acidic nature of their juice can cause issues for your pup. Further, the essential oils and compounds called psoralens in the lemon can be toxic for your pet when consumed in large enough quantities.Not only are lemons not a suitable snack for your pup, but you should also avoid sharing any other citrus fruit with your dog including grapefruits and limes as well. The only exception to this rule is oranges – but these should be shared in moderation. This is because they contain both citric acid and high levels of sugar which can lead to obesity. You also want to make sure your dog is only eating the fruit and not the peel.Even if you’re not feeding your pup lemons, they’re a pretty common household item. You want to keep your pup from stealing lemons off of a counter or even directly off a tree if you live in an area where people grow lemons. If you notice your dog is gravitating to lemons because they’re roundish and yellow (kinda like a tennis ball) you’ll want to make sure your dog understands the command leave it. If they don’t it might be a good one to brush up on. If your dog is grabbing the lemon in its mouth ask them to drop it and then reward them when they do. You do not want your pup to think lemons are toys.The other items you want to keep away from your dog are lemon essential oils and lemon-scented household cleaners. While they might be made with natural ingredients, these products can still make your dog sick. Essential oils are highly concentrated – and therefore lemon essential oil can make your dog sicker than just some lemon juice. Lemon cleaners could be natural or synthetic. Read the labels and make sure you heed any warnings, but you’ll want to keep these away from your pet regardless.

Risks associated with eating lemons

Too much lemon juice can irritate your dog’s stomach due to the high levels of citric acid. Your pup may experience vomiting or diarrhea as a result. If your pup has eaten a lot of lemons you might even notice they’re having an unusual sensitivity to light.The other thing you need to watch out for is choking or an intestinal blockage. Lemon seeds could be a choking hazard and if your pet swallows too much of the peel it could cause an intestinal blockage.Some people use lemon juice as a deterrent for puppies so they don’t chew on things they shouldn’t or a punishment for being “naughty”. This can cause more harm than good as the citric acid in the lemon juice can make your pup sick. Not only will this not help change the behavior, but will also lead to some serious clean up for you. If you want to keep your puppy from chewing on the couch or a favorite shoe – try distracting them with a chew toy or bone when you see them heading for it – and make sure to keep shoes, clothes, handbags, and other prized possessions away from young puppies or dogs who might think they look like fun toys.If your dog has eaten a lot of lemons, contact your vet or animal poison control. They will tell you what you need to do and if your pup should be seen. For most dogs, a small amount of lemon will not require a trip to the vet. In fact, other then a funny face your pet may not have a negative reaction at all.

Symptoms to Look For

Dogs are unlikely to eat a lemon voluntarily. If your pet does get ahold of one, be sure to call your vet if you notice:

Introduction

While lemons aren’t necessarily deadly for dogs (like other fruits can be), the psoralen compounds and aromatic oils in lemons are toxic enough for your pup that you can expect upset stomachs, dizziness, and even unusual sensitivity to light. Though dogs most likely won’t eat lemons on their own – the sour smell and taste are enough to throw your dog off the hunt for food – it is possible they will gobble one up – especially if they are young and curious.How can you tell if your pup is experiencing symptoms due to ingesting lemons? How can you keep your pup away from lemons in general? Check out our guide below to give you all the lemon info you and your doggo need.

The History of Dogs Eating Lemons

Dozens of sites on the internet claim that mixing up a solution of vinegar and lemon juice can be the ultimate spray to keep your dog’s bad behaviors at bay, but unfortunately, this is a dangerous mistake. Even though your dog won’t be ingesting the peel and the seeds, where the toxic materials are, the acidity of the lemon juice in your dog’s no-no spray can cause serious GI issues – this can be a painful experience for your dog as well as a serious case of clean-up for you.But even more likely, a spray with lemon in it could really bother their eyes, which you presumably want to avoid.

The Science Behind Lemon Toxicity

The real issue lies within a substance contained in most citrus fruits called psoralens. Psoralens can be found in most parts of the lemon, but are most concentrated in the skin and seeds of the lemon, making dogs who snack on lemons that grow outside on trees at severe risk.Lemon juice – sans the skin – is still dangerous, as the high acidity can upset your pup’s GI system significantly. Various internet sources will boast about the benefits of lemon essential oils for battling external parasites, but it should be noted that essential oils are simply concentrated lemon, and it’s never safe for your dog to ingest them due to the highly concentrated psoralens.