Irish Water Spaniel for Sale?

The current stock of Irish Water Spaniel (also known as the Whiptail, Shannon Spaniel, Rat Tail Spaniel, or Bog Dog) is of Irish origin, but its original ancestry is unknown. The Poodle, Portuguese Water Dog, and Barbet are all closely related to the Irish Water Spaniel, but no one is certain which breed descends from the other. The Irish Water Spaniel is the oldest and perhaps most unique Spaniel breed, depicted in manuscripts from as early as the 1100s. The modern breed was developed in Dublin, Ireland in the 1830s by Justin McCarthy. His Irish Water Spaniel Boatswain sired many dogs and is widely considered the father of the breed. The Irish Water Spaniel was recognized by the American Kennel Club in the late 1800s. It had a brief period of popularity, but is today a somewhat rare pet and show dog.

The Irish Water Spaniel has a breed characteristic coat consisting of dense, permanent curls. After brushing, the Irish Water Spaniel should be washed or allowed to swim, which will help retain its naturally curly texture.

How much does a Irish Water Spaniel cost?

The average price of an Irish Water Spaniel is between $1,500 – $2,000 per puppy.

Are Irish water spaniels good pets?

Highly intelligent and inquisitive, the Irish water spaniel is known as the clown of the spaniel family. It is a devoted companion, but socialization is important if this exuberant dog lives with small children. Irish water spaniels shed little and are an excellent pet for most people with allergies.

How big is an Irish Water Spaniel?

Irish Water Spaniel / Mass

Is Irish Water Spaniel hypoallergenic?

Irish Water Spaniel / Hypoallergenic

The tallest of the AKCs spaniels, the Irish Water Spaniel is instantly recognizable by its crisply curled coat and tapering rat tail. Among the champion swimmers of dogdom, the alert and inquisitive IWS is hardworking and brave in the field, and playfully affectionate at home.

The Irish Water Spaniel is the tallest spaniel. However, it must never be so large that it cant be invited onto a boat! The body is of medium length, the whole dog being slightly rectangular in appearance. The general appearance suggests both dash and endurance. The gait is smooth and ground covering. The coat is one of the breeds distinctive features. The body is covered with a double coat consisting of crisp ringlets. This combination imparts water, weather, and thorn resistance, enabling the dog to work or play in the harshest of conditions. The Irish Water Spaniels expression says it all: alert, intelligent, and quizzical.

The Southern Irish Spaniel, also called McCarthys Breed, is credited with being the eventual major forebear of todays dogs. In the mid 1800s, the appearance of the prolific sire Boatswain so influenced the breed that he is often credited as being the progenitor of the modern Irish Water Spaniel.

The breed entered the show ring in both Britain and America by the late 1800s. Despite its enchantingly clownish appearance and adept water-retrieving ability, the Irish Water Spaniel is now only rarely seen in the show ring or found as the family pet. This dog loves to swim, run, hike, and play and needs a lot of exercise.

A clown at heart, it can be independent, and needs to be trained with patience, firmness, and a sense of humor. The Irish Water Spaniel tends to be reserved with strangers, is sometimes timid, but is generally good with children. This active, athletic, inquisitive breed needs lots of mental and physical exertion to keep from becoming frustrated or bored.

Obedience work can also be helpful in providing the mental challenges this dog enjoys. The curly coat needs brushing and combing two to three times a week, plus scissoring every few months. If not combed out, they will form mats and cords, so this breed does require attention to grooming.

Major concerns: CHD, otitis externa Minor concerns: distichiasis Occasionally seen: megaesophagus, hypothyroidism, elbow dysplasia, seizures, nail-bed disease Suggested tests: hip, elbow, eye, thyroid Life span: 1012 years Note: May have adverse reactions to sulfa drugs or ivermectin Note: While the characteristics mentioned here may frequently represent this breed, dogs are individuals whose personalities and appearances will vary.

History

The Irish Water Spaniel is one of the oldest and most distinctive spaniels. Dogs resembling them are depicted in manuscripts from 1,000 years ago. In the 1100s, mention is made of dogs called Shannon Spaniels, Rat-Tail Spaniels, Whip-Tail Spaniels, or Irish Water Spaniels. Continued references to the Irish Water Spaniel can be found from 1600 on. Around that time, the King of France is said to have been presented with an Irish Water Spaniel. Whether the breed was at one time found in different varieties or whether several similar breeds were its forebears is a matter of conjecture. What is agreed upon is that several similar spaniels existed in Ireland: the Northern Irish, Southern Irish, and Tweed Spaniels. The Southern Irish Spaniel, also called McCarthy’s Breed, is credited with being the eventual major forebear of today’s dogs. In the mid 1800s, the appearance of the prolific sire Boatswain so influenced the breed that he is often credited as being the progenitor of the modern Irish Water Spaniel. The breed entered the show ring in both Britain and America by the late 1800s. In 1875, it was the third most popular sporting dog. Despite its enchantingly clownish appearance and adept water-retrieving ability, the Irish Water Spaniel is now only rarely seen in the show ring or found as the family pet.

Temperament

The Irish Water Spaniel goes at everything in life with gusto and enthusiasm. This dog loves to swim, run, hike, and play and needs a lot of exercise. A clown at heart, it can be independent, and needs to be trained with patience, firmness, and a sense of humor. The Irish Water Spaniel tends to be reserved with strangers, is sometimes timid, but is generally good with children.

Upkeep

This active, athletic, inquisitive breed needs lots of mental and physical exertion to keep from becoming frustrated or bored. An hour of free-running or strenuous playing a day is necessary to satisfy these needs. Obedience work can also be helpful in providing the mental challenges this dog enjoys. The curly coat needs brushing and combing two to three times a week, plus scissoring every few months. Like most dogs, this breed loses its coat periodically; however, the hairs tend to become trapped in the other hairs rather than fall off on their own. If not combed out, they will form mats and cords, so this breed does require attention to grooming.

Breed Rescue

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