Indian Ring Neck Bird?

Indian ringneck parakeets are quite popular companion birds, thanks in part to their beautiful coloring, medium size, and social nature. These birds are highly intelligent and enjoy learning new things. But they do require an attentive caretaker who can spend time handling them every day to keep them tame and prevent them from becoming bored. If you’re interested in bringing home one of these birds, first learn about some of the fascinating traits Indian ringneck parakeets possess.

During this phase, hormonal changes can increase a birds aggressive tendencies, such as hissing, biting, and general resistance to interaction. Wild Indian ringneck parakeets are normally mostly bright green with some blue tail feathers and yellow under their wings.

In fact, they were once considered sacred in their native environment based on their remarkable ability to mimic human speech. Long ago, religious leaders in India observed the birds repeating prayers that were recited daily in the gardens surrounding their places of worship.

How much do Indian ringnecks cost?

Pricing ranges from $400 to $500, though you can expect to pay up to $700 depending on the organization and the bird. If you’re going the breeder route, make sure that the breeder is reputable by asking them how long they’ve been breeding and working with Indian ringneck parakeets.

Is an Indian ringneck a good first bird?

In summary, Indian Ringnecks are enjoyed for their amazing beauty and fun personalities ; but they are not the easiest parrots to keep. We only recommend them to people who have had experience with larger parrots and are willing to put in the time and effort to keep them well socialized and entertained.

Are Indian ringnecks good birds?

Ringnecks still have a reputation of being somewhat nippy and difficult to tame. However, those who have grown to know these birds have found they can make loving pets when hand-fed as babies and properly socialized. Ringnecks that are handled every day by their caretakers generally have charming personalities.

How well do Indian ringneck parrots talk?

Though not all species of parrot are capable of talking, the Indian Ringneck parakeet is generally an excellent talker. Individual Ringnecks have been known to learn up to 250 words, making the breed an excellent choice for owners who want a talking bird.

The Indian Ringneck Parrot or Parakeet (Psittacula krameri manillensis – Bechstein, 1800) – is also sometimes referred to as Rose-ringed Parakeet or, simply, Ring-necked Parakeet.

Its closest cousin – the African Ringneck Parakeet – is found in West Africa to Southern Sudan. In order to maintain their friendly personalities and tameness, regular handling and socialization are a must for these birds.

The plumage of the Indian Ring Neck is apple green, although mutations in a range of other colors also exist. Their extensive native range now includes Pamban or Rameswaram Island (an island located between India and Sri Lanka), the Indian sub-continent, Pakistan, Afghanistan, Nepal, as well as the Burmese region to Cochinchina (the southern third of Vietnam. United States : Florida, California and Hawaii South America Europe: United Kingdom – the largest numbers are found around south London, with populations occurring in or around Battersea Park, Richmond Park, and Hampstead Heath.

Smaller flocks occur in Esher (South East England in the Greater London Urban Area), and Berkshire (South England); as well as Margate, Broadstairs and Ramsgate, Kent. Small groups are occasionally seen in Dorset, Kensington Gardens (London), South Manchester and Studland). Netherlands: Amsterdam, Rotterdam, Utrecht and The Hague Belgium: Brussels Germany: Occur along the Rhine in major urban areas, such as Cologne, Bonn, Ludwigshafen, and Heidelberg and Wiesbaden.

Also in northeastern Hamburg France: Around Paris Italy: Rome (in the gardens of the Palatine Hill and at Villa Borghese) Spain: Barcelona Africa: Tunis – the capital of Tunisia (the northernmost country in Africa); South Africa Middle East : Iran (mostly in northern Tehran); Lebanon, Israel, United Arab Emirates (UAE), Bahrain, Qatar, and Oman Japan: Hundreds of escaped pets established themselves in southwestern Tokyo, Chiba, Kanagawa, Aichi, Kyoto, Hiroshima Prefecture, Niigata, Tochigi, Saitama, Shizuoka, Gifu, Osaka, Ehime, Saga and Miyazaki Prefecture Australia The social Indian Ringnecks often congregate in large, noisy flocks at favorite roosting sites.

The Indian Ringneck Parakeet is a medium-sized parrot that measures between 14 – 17 inches (36 – 43 cm) in length – about half of which are the long tail feathers alone. Males and females look mostly alike; however, mature males (excepting some of the color mutations) can be identified by the ring around the neck, which consists of a thin black band that runs from the above the bill to the eyes and a wider black band that extends from the lower bill, getting thinner on the sides of the neck where it combines with the rose-pink collar that stretches over the back of the neck. The female generally doesn’t have the black line on the chin or throat, or the rose-colored band; however, a very pale ring might occur.

They lack the black ring, pink collar, or blue tint on the back of the head that can be seen in the adult male. Resembles the related African Ringneck Parakeet , but is larger in size. Most parrot species mate for life; however, this is not the case with the Indian Ringnecks.

They nest in tree cavities – either natural or excavated by the birds themselves using their beaks and claws. If they excavated the nest cavity themselves, the entrance hole is usually a circular, ~2 inch + opening. The fact that they come in a wide array of beautiful mutation colors is also a big draw for breeders.

The rose-ringed parakeet (Psittacula krameri), also known as the ring-necked parakeet, is a medium-sized parrot in the genus Psittacula, of the family Psittacidae. It has disjunct native ranges in Africa and the Indian Subcontinent, and is now introduced into many other parts of the world where feral populations have established themselves and are bred for the exotic pet trade.

One of the few parrot species that have successfully adapted to living in disturbed habitats, it has withstood the onslaught of urbanisation and deforestation . As a popular pet species, escaped birds have colonised a number of cities around the world, including Northern and Western Europe.

These parakeets have also proven themselves capable of living in a variety of climates outside their native range, and are able to survive low winter temperatures in Northern Europe. [3][4] The species is listed as least concern by the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN) because its population appears to be increasing, but its popularity as a pet and unpopularity with farmers have reduced its numbers in some parts of its native range. The African parakeet also started to breed in Israel and Jordan in the 1980s and is considered an invasive species .

Abyssinian rose-ringed parakeet ( P. k. parvirostris ): northwest Somalia , west across northern Ethiopia to Sennar state, Sudan Indian rose-ringed parakeet ( P. k. manillensis ) originates from the southern Indian subcontinent and has feral and naturalised populations worldwide. In Australia , Great Britain (mainly around London ), the United States , and other western countries, it is often referred to as the Indian ringneck parrot. Boreal rose-ringed parakeet ( P. k. borealis ) is distributed in Bangladesh , Pakistan , northern India and Nepal to central Burma ; introduced populations are found worldwide.

It has established itself on a large scale in Germany, France, Belgium, the Netherlands, Italy, and especially the UK. In the wild, rose-ringed parakeets usually feed on buds, fruits, vegetables, nuts , berries, and seeds . Wild flocks also fly several miles to forage in farmlands and orchards, causing extensive damage.

Feral parakeets will regularly visit gardens and other locations near human habitation, taking food from bird feeders . In captivity, rose-ringed parakeets will take a large variety of food and can be fed on a number of fruits, vegetables, pellets, seeds, and even small amounts of cooked meat for protein. Birds that display this mutation have solid light blue feathers instead of green, and lack the rings of their normal counterparts.

A feral female in a garden in Bromley, LondonRose-ringed parakeets feeding on stored grainA popular pet, the rose-ringed parakeet has been released in a wide range of cities around the world, giving it an environment with few predators where their preferred diet of seeds, nuts, fruits, and berries is available from suburban gardens and bird feeders . It has established feral populations in a number of European cities, South Africa and Japan . It is also found throughout Lebanon, Israel, Iran, Jordan , the UAE , Bahrain, Qatar, and Oman.

There is a burgeoning population of feral parakeets in Great Britain which is centred around suburban London and the Home Counties of South-East England . There is also an established population to the North East of London in Essex at Loughton and Theydon Bois by Epping Forest . [17] It has been suggested that feral parrots could endanger populations of native British birds, and that the rose-ringed parakeet could even be culled as a result, [18] although this is not currently recommended by conservation organisations.

[19] A major agricultural pest in locations such as India, as of 2011 the rose-ringed parakeet population was growing rapidly, but is generally limited to urban areas in southern England [20] The specimens in these naturalised populations often represent intra-specific hybrids , originally between varying numbers (according to locality) of the subspecies manillensis , borealis [ verification needed ] , and/or (to a lesser extent) krameri along with some inter-specific hybrids with naturalised Psittacula eupatria ( Alexandrine parakeet ). ^ a b Pru, Liviu; Strubbe, Diederik; Mori, Emiliano; Menchetti, Mattia; Ancillotto, Leonardo; van Kleunen, Andr; White, Rachel; Luna, lvaro; Hernndez-Brito, Dailos; Le Louarn, Marine; Clergeau, Philippe; Albayrak, Tamer; Franz, Detlev; Braun, Michael; Schroeder, Julia; Wink, Michael (2016).

Environmental, dietary, and hormonal factors in the regulation of seasonal breeding in free-living female Indian rose-ringed parakeets (Psittacula krameri). Environmental and hormonal factors in seasonal breeding in free-living male Indian rose-ringed parakeets (Psittacula krameri). “Worldwide impact of alien parrots (Aves Psittaciformes) on native biodiversity and environment: a review”.

^ Hernndez-Brito, Dailos; Carrete, Martina; Ibez, Carlos; Juste, Javier; Tella, Jos L. (2018). “Nest-site competition and killing by invasive parakeets cause the decline of a threatened bat population” .

The Indian ring-necked parakeet is not a shy bird, and does best with an owner who appreciates an outgoing companion that is not afraid to demand what it wants! Indian ring-necks can also be quite talkative.

However, the Indian ring-necked will charm and delight the person who takes the time to appreciate its other qualities a playful exuberance and a remarkable talking ability. As its name suggests, the Indian ring-necked parakeet originates from India, where it is still found wild in great quantities, even in urban areas.

If you can handle a good deal of chattering, some of it ear-piercing, and you have the time and energy to spend with this beautiful bird, consider welcoming an Indian ring-necked parakeet into your family. As with any bird, make sure to feed a balanced, nutritious diet that includes pellets, fruit, veggies, and healthy table foods. Indian ring-necked parakeets are relatively healthy birds; however they are susceptible to Polyomavirus, pssitacosis, apergillosis and bacterial infections.

Rose-ringed parakeet

TheOne of the few parrot species that have successfully adapted to living in disturbed habitats, it has withstood the onslaught of urbanisation and deforestation. As a popular pet species, escaped birds have colonised a number of cities around the world, including Northern and Western Europe.

Diet[edit]

Four subspecies are recognised, though they differ little:The Indian subspecies are both larger than the African subspecies.The genus name

Reproduction[edit]

In north-west India, Indian rose-ringed parakeets form pairs from September to December. They do not have life mates and often breed with another partner during the following breeding season. During this cold season, they select and defend nest sites, thus avoiding competition for sites with other birds. Feeding on winter pea crops provides the female with nutrients necessary for egg production. From April to June, they care for their young. Fledglings are ready to leave the nest before monsoon.

Aviculture[edit]

Rose-ringed parakeets are popular as pets and they have a long history in aviculture. The ancient Greeks kept the Indian subspecies

Mimicry[edit]

Both males and females have the ability to mimic human speech. First, the bird listens to its surroundings, and then it copies the voice of the human speaker. Some people hand-raise rose-ringed parakeet chicks for this purpose. Such parrots then become quite tame and receptive to learning.

Feral birds[edit]

A popular pet, the rose-ringed parakeet has been released in a wide range of cities around the world, giving it an environment with few predators where their preferred diet of seeds, nuts, fruits, and berries is available from suburban gardens and bird feeders.The European populations became established during the mid-to-late 20th century. There is a burgeoning population of feral parakeets in Great Britain which is centred around suburban London and the Home Counties of South-East England.A Europe-wide count was held in 2015 and found 85,220 Rose-ringed parakeets in 10 European countries.In the Netherlands, the feral population in the four largest urban areas (Amsterdam, Rotterdam, Utrecht and especially in The Hague) was estimated at 10,000 birds in 2010, almost double the number of birds estimated in 2004.The specimens in these naturalised populations often represent intra-specific hybrids, originally between varying numbers (according to locality) of the subspeciesWhere introduced, rose-ringed parakeets may affect native biodiversity and human economy and wellness.Rose-ringed parakeets are a direct threat to populations of Europe’s largest bat, the greater noctule, as parakeets compete with the bats for nesting sites, and will attack and kill adults before colonising their habitat.In the United Kingdom and especially within London, parakeets face predation by native birds of prey and owls, including the Peregrine falcon (There is a breeding population on Madeira Island, Portugal.There is a feral population of the birds in Japan. In the 1960s many Japanese people became pet owners for the first time and the parakeet was widely imported as a pet. Some escaped or were released and formed populations around the country. By the 1980s groups could be found in Tokyo, Osaka, Nagoya, Niigata and Kyushu. Some groups since died out, but as of 2009 there was a large population residing at the Tokyo Institute of Technology’s main campus at Ookayama, along with small groups in Maebashi and Chiba city.Feral ring-necked parakeets have sporadically been observed around New Zealand, and are treated as a major potential threat to the country’s native bird populations due to their potential to outcompete native parakeet species, and introduce diseases.

Native Region / Natural Habitat

As its name suggests, the Indian ring-necked parakeet originates from India, where it is still found wild in great quantities, even in urban areas.

Care & Feeding

Indian ring-necked parakeets are sensitive birds that need lots of play time and time out of the cage to remain happy; if not, expect your bird to develop neurotic disorders that many be very difficult to reverse.Because of the long tail, Indian ring necks need a larger cage than another bird of the same relative size. Ring necks love their toys, and will hang on them and toss them around the cage, so be sure to have lots of toys on hand to replace the ones your bird destroys — this type of destruction is a normal, healthy part of being a companion bird. If you can handle a good deal of chattering, some of it ear-piercing, and you have the time and energy to spend with this beautiful bird, consider welcoming an Indian ring-necked parakeet into your family.Indian ring necks tend to have good appetites. As with any bird, make sure to feed a balanced, nutritious diet that includes pellets, fruit, veggies, and healthy table foods. This way you can be sure that your bird is nourished and will not become bored with his diet. Nutri-Berries, Avi-Cakes, and Premium Daily Diet are some of the Lafeber foods that offer optimum nutrition that encourages interaction.These birds are reported to live for more than 30 years.

Personality & Behavior

Indian ring-necked parakeets can make sweet, tame pets but will not remain so if neglected. If played with every single day, these birds can be loving, loyal companions. If neglected, you can have a biter on your hands. These might not be the best birds for children, as ring necks tend to be sensitive to commotion, including night frights (thrashing around the cage during the night as if startled). Ring-necked parakeets are not shy birds, and will do best with an owner who appreciates an outgoing companion that is not afraid to demand what it wants!

Speech & Sound

These are chatty birds, especially when they learn to talk. You may delight in hearing your Indian ring-necked says its first few words, and then shortly realize that he won’t shut up! Be careful what you teach him, because you will be hearing it loudly and often for many, many years. They are great whistlers too, but try to teach words and phrases before whistling, or your bird may fancy whistling over talking and never learn many words.

Health & Common Conditions

Indian ring-necked parakeets are relatively healthy birds; however they are susceptible to Polyomavirus, pssitacosis, apergillosis and bacterial infections. Indian ring-necked parakeets are excellent fliers and are capable of flying even after a recent wing-feather trim, so time outdoors should be in a harness or in a travel carrier to prevent them from flying away.