Hypothyroidism in Dogs Symptoms?

Located in the neck, the thyroid gland produces a hormone called thyroxine, which controls metabolism (the process of converting food into fuel). Issues occur when the gland doesnt make enough of this hormone and hypothyroidism may become a problem in your dog.

As you might imagine, specific skin issues such as dandruff and infections can make for an uncomfortable dog. Your vet may also notice your pups ability to walk is hindered or his body is weak due to abnormally functioning muscles and nerves.

Though not widespread, the condition is also linked to seizures, issues with blood vessels and heart, and infertility. Left untreated, hypothyroidism can impact your dogs quality of life, so its important to book an appointment with your vet to get an official diagnosis. He or she may prescribe specific doses of the manmade hormone levothyroxine (L-thyroxine) to be taken orally on a daily basis for the rest of your dogs life.

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How do you know if your dog has hypothyroidism?

Signs of hypothyroidism include hair loss, usually on your dog’s trunk, back of the rear legs, and tail. Their coat will be dull and thin, their skin flaky, but not itchy or red (which is usually tied to fleas or an allergic reaction). They may also have black patches of skin.

What happens if hypothyroidism is left untreated in dogs?

A dog is hypothyroid when their thyroid does not produce enough metabolism-regulating hormones. This deficiency, if left untreated, can lead to a host of other debilitating diseases including corneal ulcers, anemia, and a devastating disease called adult-onset megaesophagus, which will eventually lead to death.

How long do dogs with hypothyroidism live?

Pets treated for canine hypothyroidism have an excellent prognosis and their life expectancy is normal. Although it is not curable, it is a manageable disorder. Clinical abnormalities (flaky skin, hair loss, lethargy) may take a few weeks to a few months to resolve.

What are the warning signs of hypothyroidism?

Fatigue..Increased sensitivity to cold..Constipation..Dry skin..Weight gain..Puffy face..Hoarseness..Muscle weakness.

The thyroid gland is in the neck. It makes a hormone called thyroxine that controls metabolism (the process of turning food into fuel). With hypothyroidism, the gland doesnt make enough of that hormone.

Hypothyroidism in dogs is usually caused by inflammation or shrinkage of the thyroid gland, which is located in the neck and produces hormones that affect the function of many parts of the body. Dogs with thyroid disease usually have a low production of thyroid hormones.

Hair loss occurs primarily over the body, sparing the head and legs, and is usually not accompanied by itching or redness of the skin. Hypothyroid dogs may also develop skin infections that may be itchy and result in sores on the body.

Treating hypothyroidism requires giving an oral replacement hormone for the rest of the dogs life. Washington State University assumes no liability for injury to you or your pet incurred by following these descriptions or procedures.

Symptoms

Signs of hypothyroidism include hair loss, usually on your dog’s trunk, back of the rear legs, and tail. Their coat will be dull and thin, their skin flaky, but not itchy or red (which is usually tied to fleas or an allergic reaction). They may also have black patches of skin. This is followed by weight gain (despite decreased appetite), muscle loss, sluggishness, a slowed heart rate, toenail and ear infections, and intolerance to cold. It’s not widespread, but hypothyroidism is also linked to seizures, heart and blood vessel problems, and infertility.For a diagnosis, your vet will do a series of blood tests.

What is hypothyroidism?

Hypothyroidism in dogs is usually caused by inflammation or shrinkage of the thyroid gland, which is located in the neck and produces hormones that affect the function of many parts of the body. Dogs with thyroid disease usually have a low production of thyroid hormones.Overactive thyroid glands in the dog are rare and are usually associated with cancer. Thyroid cancer can cause hypothyroidism, although it does not occur commonly in dogs.Hypothyroidism occurs more commonly in medium to large breed dogs and usually in middle-aged dogs. Breeds commonly affected include golden retrievers, Doberman pinchers, and Irish setters.

How is hypothyroidism diagnosed?

The most common signs of low thyroid function in dogs include:Hair loss occurs primarily over the body, sparing the head and legs, and is usually not accompanied by itching or redness of the skin. Some dogs will have thickening of the skin and increased skin pigment, especially in areas of friction, such as the armpit. Hypothyroid dogs often have ear infections and show ear pain, redness, and odor. Hypothyroid dogs may also develop skin infections that may be itchy and result in sores on the body. The accumulation of substances called mucopolysaccharides can cause the muscles of the face to droop, giving the dog a facial expression that is sometimes called “tragic.”Less commonly recognized signs that may be seen in a small number of dogs include dilation of the esophagus (megaesophagus) causing regurgitation and abnormal function of nerves or muscles leading to weakness or abnormal ability to walk.

How is hypothyroidism treated?

Treating hypothyroidism requires giving an oral replacement hormone for the rest of the dog’s life. Initially, thyroid hormone is usually given twice daily. Once the hair coat begins to improve, some dogs can be maintained on once-daily medication. It usually takes 4 to 6 weeks before regrowth of the fur is apparent.