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This is a question that more than 5183 of our readers have been asking us! Luckily, we have found the most appropriate information for you!

Whether it’s a friendly feral cat or your own pet, felines can wreak havoc on your outdoor space. Learn the tips and tricks that will keep cats from doing their business in your garden, and scaring birds and other wildlife away.

Whether it’s the family feline or a neighborhood stray, few of us take kindly to cats killing songbirds or using our vegetable gardens as litter boxes. Cats are born hunters, which helps keep the rodent and pest population down in your yard, but their predatory behavior may scare away the birds that are inhabiting (and naturally pollinating) your veggies and flowers. Once mixed, spray it on bushes, poisonous plants , fence posts, and anything other items or areas you don’t want disturbed by cats. Some cat repellent manufacturers produce granular versions of their products too, which work particularly as protective barriers around the property’s perimeter. This is one cat deterrent that must be planned carefully: No one wants to spray an unsuspecting neighbor if they get too close to the property line, or a delivery person dropping off packages.

How do I keep my neighbor's cat out of my yard?

Shift the cats’ food source to a less central location, where you won’t mind if they hang out..Apply fragrances that deter cats around the edges of your yard, the tops of fences, and on any favorite digging areas or plants. ….Install an ultrasonic deterrent or a motion-activated sprinkler.

How do you stop cats from coming in your yard?

Remove any food from the yard. Cats are likely attracted to any type of feed in your yard. ….Create a rough area in your garden. ….Block off any shelter. ….Wash down their favorite spots. ….Set up a security system to scare them.

What is the most effective homemade cat repellent?

Citronella oil is a home made cat repellent that many people have had success with. Citronella is best known as a mosquito repellent, but cats find the Citronella odor to be distasteful. Simply mix one part Citronella oil to four parts water and spray liberally in the troubled areas.

Not everyone wants cats playing in their yard or digging in their garden. Keeping the cats away from areas where they’re not welcome is an important way to maintain good relations with the neighbors. In the end, the cats are going to be better off if everyone is happy than if there is constant conflict. A number of tools and techniques, listed below, can be used to keep cats out of gardens and yards. Keep in mind that TNR will make cats better neighbors, too. Neutering means dramatically less noise, no foul odors from unaltered males spraying, less roaming and so less visibility, and no kittens.

Using infrared rays, the device detects when a cat enters an area and then shoots out a sudden burst of water. Similar to a motion activated sprinkler, an ultrasonic device covers the area to be protected with an infrared field. The effectiveness of ultrasonic deterrents is highly dependent on placing them properly and not exceeding the maximum coverage range of the device. There are numerous products available with different features, including AC adapter, solar-powered, audio frequencies for other kinds of animals, audible alarms, strobe lights and more. When a cat attempts to jump up and over the fence, he has to grab hold of the roll bar which spins upon contact and forces kitty to drop safely back to the ground. Scent repellants – which can take the form of sprays, pellets or even plants – get mixed reviews, sometimes reportedly working well, other times not at all. Effectiveness is maximized by placing or spraying them around the edges of the area being protected, including on top of fences, and on any favorite digging spots or plants. You can try orange and lemon peels (cats dislike citrus scents), the herb rue which can also be planted live, cayenne pepper, coffee grounds, pipe tobacco and various oils, including lavender, lemon grass, citronella, peppermint, eucalyptus and mustard. The 78 inch long mat has plastic spikes pointing upwards which discourage digging without harming the cat. One way to stop cats from eliminating in one spot, like a flower garden, is to give them a more attractive place to go, preferably well off in a far corner of the yard.

Community cats, also called feral cats, are unowned cats who live outdoors. Like indoor cats, they belong to the domestic cat species (felis catus). However, community cats are generally not socialized, or friendly, to people, and are therefore unadoptable. They live full, healthy lives with their feline families, called colonies, in their outdoor homes.

It wasn’t until kitty litter was invented in the late 1940s that some cats began living strictly indoors. Like all animals, community cats settle where food and shelter are available, and they are naturally skilled at finding these on their own. Because they are unsocialized, community cats can’t live indoors with people, and are therefore unadoptable. Trap-Neuter-Return (TNR) is the humane, effective, and mainstream approach to addressing community cat populations. In a TNR program, community cats are humanely trapped, brought to a veterinarian to be spayed or neutered, vaccinated, eartipped (the universal sign that a cat is part of a TNR program), and then returned to their outdoor homes. Adult cats who are socialized can be adopted, but they can also be returned outdoors, where they will continue to thrive. The Vacuum Effect has been documented worldwide in many species, including community cats. Animal control’s typical approach has been to catch and kill community cats. Other cats move into the newly available territory and continue to breed—this phenomenon is called the Vacuum Effect. TNR is the only effective and humane approach to address community cat populations. REASON : It is a cat’s natural instinct to dig in soft or loose soil, moss, mulch, or sand. Make an outdoor litter box away from your garden by tilling the soil or placing sand in an out-of-the-way spot in your yard. You can also set chicken wire firmly into the dirt (roll sharp edges under), arrange branches or sticks in a lattice pattern, or put wooden or plastic fencing over soil. Each mat has flexible plastic spikes that are harmless to cats and other animals but discourage digging. Cover exposed ground in flower beds with large river rocks to prevent cats from digging. Quick Tips: Shift the cats’ food source to a less central location, where you won’t mind if they hang out. Apply fragrances that deter cats around the edges of your yard, the tops of fences, and on any favorite digging areas or plants.

Of course, we love kitties from all walks of life. But that doesn’t mean unwanted guests are always welcome. Cats can be destructive, and sometimes strays can carry disease. If you have a garden, you might want to keep strange cats out to prevent them from digging up your plants or using your garden space as a litter box.

Luckily, we have found some incredibly humane and easy ways to keep these visitors away. Whether you leave seed out for squirrels or sugar water for hummingbirds, you might love feeding the wildlife around your neighborhood. Image Credit: Pixabay If you’re gardening or pulling weeds from your flower bed, the last thing you want to do is stick your hand in a pile of cat droppings. Cat poop can carry lots of nasty bacteria that could potentially make you sick. Cats who haven’t had regular vet care can be at risk of carrying transmissible microbes in their poop. This parasite is contracted by eating small mice, birds, and other backyard rodents. It’s especially harmful to pregnant women because it can transmit to the unborn baby—having extreme consequences in some cases. Image Credit: NeydtStock, Shutterstock It might get your family pets all riled up to see an unfamiliar cat in the yard. Not only can it upset the family dog—it also might pose a risk to your felines if you occasionally let them explore your yard. Keeping up with regular vet care is a great way to avoid any issues with strays. Image Credit: rihaij, Pixabay Perhaps the most obvious reason you don’t want unwanted cats in your yard is to prevent your garden from becoming a litter box. Coffee grounds are completely biodegradable, replenishing your soil and promoting optimal growth. Image Credit: PixabayIf a cat has used your lawn or garden as their own personal litter box, they’re going to return for a repeat offense. There are also options to have caged fencing around your gardens that keep your plants fully exposed to light while staying protected. Image Credit: Jennifer McCallum, ShutterstockIf the cats are your own and don’t have another method that works, you can always try to set litter boxes outside. Image Credit: Okssi, ShutterstockMany local shelters can assist you with stray animals. You would get a live trap or some other means of containment, take the cat into the shelter, and they will spay or neuter the animal.

How To: Keep Cats Out of Your Yard

Whether it’s a friendly feral cat or your own pet, felines can wreak havoc on your outdoor space. Learn the tips and tricks that will keep cats from doing their business in your garden, and scaring birds and other wildlife away.

Whether it’s the family feline or a neighborhood stray, few of us take kindly to cats killing songbirds or using our vegetable gardens as litter boxes. Their urine can mark patio furniture, plants and garden pots; solid waste can carry intestinal parasites and diseases such as toxoplasmosis, which no one wants near their edible garden. Cats are born hunters, which helps keep the rodent and pest population down in your yard, but their predatory behavior may scare away the birds that are inhabiting (and naturally pollinating) your veggies and flowers.Successfully keeping cats out of your yard has a lot to do with the kinds of plants that are in the yard, the yard’s layout, and how determined the feline is to disturb your space. While there are a host of yard practices and deterrents to keep backyard pests at bay, certain tactics work particularly well at keeping cats away.

Spray—or lay—a cat repellent.

Cat repellents contain ingredients that smell and taste repugnant to cats. There are indoor and outdoor formulas, so it’s important to get the right type. Liquid outdoor cat repellents usually come in a concentrated formula that requires diluting before use. Once mixed, spray it on bushes, poisonous plants, fence posts, and anything other items or areas you don’t want disturbed by cats. Outdoor sprays usually last for a week or more before they have to be reapplied. Some cat repellent manufacturers produce granular versions of their products too, which work particularly as protective barriers around the property’s perimeter.

Set a motion-activated sprinkler.

Most cats hate water. They hate surprise water ambushes even more, which is why motion-activated sprinklers are a great way to get the jump on stealthy cats. These sprinklers’ sensors begin spraying water when they detect motion within a 30- to 40-foot radius. Some models are equipped with an infrared sensor that makes them less likely to turn on when leaves or debris tumble past. This is one cat deterrent that must be planned carefully: No one wants to spray an unsuspecting neighbor if they get too close to the property line, or a delivery person dropping off packages.

Use ultrasonic devices.

Ultrasonic cat deterrents have motion and/or infrared sensors that emit ultrasonic frequencies that cats don’t like. Some of these devices also have strobe lights or predator calls to further deter cats and other animals from entering the property. One study showed that these devices reduced the frequency of cat visits by about 46 percent. These ultrasonic pest repellers are a particularly good option if you’re plagued by critters other than cats too, because opossums, raccoons, and rodents are all deterred by the ultrasonic sound.

Put away all possible enticements.

Another way to keep cats from hanging out in your yard is to ensure there’s nothing to attract them to your outdoor space. Cats are attracted to the scent of food, so try feeding pets elsewhere—and bring the food indoors at night. Keep outdoor grills and barbecues well cleaned, removing charred food that attracts unwanted yard visitors. Secure garbage cans and recycling bins so cats cannot easily pick through them. Because the bird seed in bird feeders attracts birds, and birds attract cats, you might also put the feeder away for a while until the cat problem is under control.

Peace with the neighbors is a click away

Not everyone wants cats playing in their yard or digging in their garden. Keeping the cats away from areas where they’re not welcome is an important way to maintain good relations with the neighbors. In the end, the cats are going to be better off if everyone is happy than if there is constant conflict. A number of tools and techniques, listed below, can be used to keep cats out of gardens and yards. Keep in mind that TNR will make cats better neighbors, too. Neutering means dramatically less noise, no foul odors from unaltered males spraying, less roaming and so less visibility, and no kittens.

Ultrasonic devices

Our favorite deterrent! Using infrared rays, the device detects when a cat enters an area and then shoots out a sudden burst of water. The spray rarely hits the cat, but startles him and scares him away. Before long, cats in the neighborhood learn the boundaries of the infrared field and are trained to stay out.Motion activated sprinklers are connected to a hose. In cold climates, the device will not function in wintertime if the water in the hose freezes. Put it out instead during the spring, summer or fall in time for the cats to be trained by winter. Common accessories needed are a hose, a Y connector if you want to attach another hose for gardening or other purposes to your spigot, and batteries.Models include:

Cat-proof fencing

Fencing specially designed to contain cats within areas, like a yard, can also be used to keep cats out. Just point the slanted top of the fencing outwards instead of in. Cat-proof fencing is relatively expensive, but if you have the budget, it’s highly effective. It can be purchased as a stand-alone fence or an extension to the top of an existing fence. Manufacturers include Purrfect Fence

Oscillot Cat Containment System

Oscillot involves installation of roll bars, also called paddles, on top of existing fences. When a cat attempts to jump up and over the fence, he has to grab hold of the roll bar which spins upon contact and forces kitty to drop safely back to the ground. Check out the Oscillot site for videos of the product in action. Like cat-proof fencing, the product is marketed for keeping pet cats contained, but can also be used to keep free-roaming cats out. Designed and manufactured in Australia, Oscillot now has a USA-based distributor for North America. Also sold in Australia where international shipping is available. Note that this product may not function during winters in cold climates if the roll bars get wet and freeze.

Scent repellants

Scent repellants – which can take the form of sprays, pellets or even plants – get mixed reviews, sometimes reportedly working well, other times not at all. Effectiveness is maximized by placing or spraying them around the edges of the area being protected, including on top of fences, and on any favorite digging spots or plants. They often need to be replenished after it rains, especially the spray varieties. Natural (non-chemical) products include:

What is a community cat?

Community cats, also called feral cats, are unowned cats who live outdoors. Like indoor cats, they belong to the domestic cat species (Cats living outdoors is nothing new. It wasn’t until kitty litter was invented in the late 1940s that some cats began living strictly indoors. But community cats truly thrive in their outdoor homes. The tips in this brochure will help you coexist with community cats.

Why do I see community cats in my neighborhood?

Community cats live outdoors. Like all animals, community cats settle where food and shelter are available, and they are naturally skilled at finding these on their own.Because they are unsocialized, community cats can’t live indoors with people, and are therefore unadoptable. Community cats should not be taken to animal shelters—nationwide, virtually 100 percent of community cats taken to shelters are killed there. Trap-Neuter-Return (TNR) is the humane, effective, and mainstream approach to addressing community cat populations.

What is Trap-Neuter-Return?

In a TNR program, community cats are humanely trapped, brought to a veterinarian to be spayed or neutered, vaccinated, eartipped (the universal sign that a cat is part of a TNR program), and then returned to their outdoor homes. Kittens less than 8 weeks old can be socialized and then adopted. Adult cats who are socialized can be adopted, but they can also be returned outdoors, where they will continue to thrive.TNR improves cats’ lives and provides an effective, humane, and collaborative way for communities to coexist with cats. To learn more, including how to conduct TNR, visit

What does the Vacuum Effect have to do with TNR?

The Vacuum Effect has been documented worldwide in many species, including community cats. Animal control’s typical approach has been to catch and kill community cats. While this may temporarily reduce the number of community cats in a given area, it is ultimately counterproductive, as the population of cats rebounds. Other cats move into the newly available territory and continue to breed—this phenomenon is called the Vacuum Effect. It’s why catch and kill doesn’t work. TNR is the only effective and humane approach to address community cat populations. Learn more at

What You Should Do If…

Cats are digging in your garden.

Quick Tips:

Cats are lounging in your yard or porch, or on your car.

Cats are sleeping under your porch or in your shed.

Feeding cats attracts insects and wildlife.

Cats are yowling, fighting, spraying, roaming, and having kittens.

Reasons You Might Want to Keep Strays Away

You might want to keep cats out of your yard for several reasons, but let’s cover the basics.

Cats Kill Natures Critters

Whether you leave seed out for squirrels or sugar water for hummingbirds, you might love feeding the wildlife around your neighborhood. If you have a stray or two around, they can kill or injure the little critters running around your backyard.This behavior can ruin the peace and aesthetic you have going on. Cats are natural carnivores, so they are drawn to killing smaller prey. While this is an entirely normal phenomenon and no fault of the cat—it’s also something you want to avoid in your own yard.

Cat Poop Can Be Harmful

If you’re gardening or pulling weeds from your flower bed, the last thing you want to do is stick your hand in a pile of cat droppings. Not only is it disgusting, it’s also completely unsanitary. Cat poop can carry lots of nasty bacteria that could potentially make you sick.Cats who haven’t had regular vet care can be at risk of carrying transmissible microbes in their poop. They can carry a parasite calledThis parasite can cause an illness called toxoplasmosis. It’s especially harmful to pregnant women because it can transmit to the unborn baby—having extreme consequences in some cases.

It Can Upset Your Pets

It might get your family pets all riled up to see an unfamiliar cat in the yard. Not only can it upset the family dog—it also might pose a risk to your felines if you occasionally let them explore your yard.Keeping up with regular vet care is a great way to avoid any issues with strays. You can get your cats vaccinated and spayed or neutered to protect them. However, illnesses like feline leukemia can still spread to your cat via saliva, blood, and feces.Since stray cats can carry this disease without your knowledge, you might want to keep them away from your cats for their own protection.

Cats Might Destroy Your Garden or Flowers

Perhaps the most obvious reason you don’t want unwanted cats in your yard is to prevent your garden from becoming a litter box.Cats are programmed to cover their waste. If you just planted a garden or flower bed with fresh plants, they might not have deeply rooted in the soil yet. Some smaller annual flowers never do. Just a few kicks can dig up your plants, killing or damaging them.

Top 9 Humane and Easy Ways to Get Rid of Strays:

So, you’re here because you want to keep stray cats out of your yard. Here are nine different humane ways to deter cats from getting into your yard or garden. You can use one or a combination of these methods to make sure that neighborhood cats choose another place to do their business.

1. Plant Cat-Repelling Plants

Cats really like to steer clear of some plants. Add some of these selections to your flowerbed, vegetable garden, or yard perimeter:Its plants are completely non-toxic for kids, but they don’t like to be around them either. These plants are a gorgeous addition to any. So it’s really a win-win for you.

2. Use Citrus Smells

Cats typically dislike the smell of citrus. If you’re having trouble with cats getting into your flowerbed, this is a risk-free option. You can scatter peels from oranges, limes, grapefruit, and other citrus fruits. These peels are totally safe and non-toxic for felines, but it makes your space undesirable.

3. Sprinkle Coffee Grounds

Coffee grounds can come into handy in your garden for a variety of reasons. Cats and dogs are both deterred by the strong scent of coffee. You can just put wet coffee grounds in your regular compost or sprinkle by itself.Not only does it pesky strays out of your greenery, it also strengthens your soil for richness and purity. Coffee grounds are completely biodegradable, replenishing your soil and promoting optimal growth.

4. Remove Urine Markings

If a cat has used your lawn or garden as their own personal litter box, they’re going to return for a repeat offense. Cats tend to go to the bathroom in the same spots. Thoroughly hose down the area to remove any previous odors or scents and not re-attract the same crowd.

5. Build Barriers

If you have the space for it, you can always make a barrier around your yard or garden. Much as farmer McGregor tried to keep bunnies out of his garden, you can do the same with cats. Barriers can also be quite effective in keeping out other creatures that want to snack on your veggies.If you already have a fenced-in yard, make sure there are no small spaces cats can squeeze through. Reinforce any spaces that a cat could weasel their slinky bodies through to prevent it. There are also options to have caged fencing around your gardens that keep your plants fully exposed to light while staying protected.

6. Make your Garden Unpleasant

It’s no secret that cats love digging. One of the main reasons they like fresh soil is that it’s easy to do their business. If you make your flowerbeds or garden unattractive to them, they will likely steer clear of it.Rather than using traditional mulch or soft soil, try to use prickly, uncomfortable options instead. You can use pine needles as mulch or plant thorny or vining plants as a carpet around your existing plants. Cats won’t like the way this feels on their calls, nor will they be able to dig easily.

7. Store-Bought Animal Repellents

There are many store-bought options for you when it comes to deterring strays from lingering around. Some of these repellents use a combination of scents that cats can’t stand. But most of them are gentle and natural enough not to hurt the feline or your plants in your garden or yard.You can find all-natural, safe options on sites like Chewy.

8. Put Litter Boxes Out

If the cats are your own and don’t have another method that works, you can always try to set litter boxes outside. Sure—it might be a pain to clean multiple litter boxes indoors and out, but it can be worth it.If you do your part to make other areas undesirable and set out litter boxes as an added reinforcement, your cat will most likely use the litter box in place of your garden soil.

9. Contact a Local Shelter

Many local shelters can assist you with stray animals. Whether they come to rescue the animal or guide you on what to do next, they can sometimes provide helpful tips to get you on the right track. Many shelters perform what is called a TNR, which stands for trap neuter and release.You would get a live trap or some other means of containment, take the cat into the shelter, and they will spay or neuter the animal. You can then release it back into the wild to fend for itself. It might seem harsh, but it does reduce unwanted breeding and behaviors, such as urine marking, on your property.