How to Keep Cats Away?

Maybe you have a pet at home that doesnt appreciate the neighborhood cats on his turf. Perhaps you have a bird feeder and enjoy watching your avian friends and all their antics. We understand why youd want to keep the unwanted felines out of your yard. Estimates are that outdoor and feral cats kill upward of 2.4 billion birds a year.

If you make your yard inhospitable to them , theyll move on to easier pickings without a lot more effort on your part. Photo credit: pixel2013, PixabayCitrus smells, whether its lemon , orange, or grapefruit, are sure to turn away any cateven the most curious feline.

Image: PxHereApple cider vinegar is also acidic and can cause skin irritation if an inquisitive cat gets too close. It can cause damage to their digestive system if large amounts of undiluted apple cider vinegar are ingested. Image: NeedpixIf you know where the rogue cat is entering your yard, itll give you the ammunition for another effective deterrent.

Without the opposable thumb that raccoons have, this trick will put up a formidable barrier that will make your yard less welcoming to hungry felines. However, you should keep in mind that geraniums are classified as toxic to dogs and cats, as the essential oils can cause gastrointestinal upset, muscle weakness, and in larger exposures, depression or hypothermia. Likewise, put the feeder away from trees or other access points to make it more difficult for them to harass the birds that youre trying to attract.

How can I keep the cats away from my house?

Shift the cats’ food source to a less central location, where you won’t mind if they hang out..Apply fragrances that deter cats around the edges of your yard, the tops of fences, and on any favorite digging areas or plants. ….Install an ultrasonic deterrent or a motion-activated sprinkler.

How do you keep stray cats out of your yard?

To keep cats away from gardens, flower beds, or specific areas of property, scatter fragrant items that don’t appeal to a cat’s sense of smell, like fresh orange or lemon peels, organic citrus-scented sprays, coffee grounds, vinegar, pipe tobacco, or oil of lavender, lemongrass, citronella, or eucalyptus.

What smell do cats hate the most?

As a general rule, cats are sensitive when it comes to smells, but there are a few scents they hate that might just surprise you. They can’t stand citrus and as much as you might love the smell of fresh herbs, cats hate rosemary and thyme. Banana and mustard are a big no-no too, as well as lavender and eucalyptus.

What is the most effective homemade cat repellent?

Citronella oil is a home made cat repellent that many people have had success with. Citronella is best known as a mosquito repellent, but cats find the Citronella odor to be distasteful. Simply mix one part Citronella oil to four parts water and spray liberally in the troubled areas.

As much as we may adore cats, stray and feral felines can be detrimental to your yard if they make a habit of visiting and staying. They can make your yard their personal litter box, attack any pets, and spread parasites and fleas. This article will offer some advice on how to dissuade stray cats from invading your yard.

Avoid feeding any pets outside and make sure any trash with food scraps is properly covered and sealed. Rue Lavender Pennyroyal Coleus canina (Scaredy cat plant) Lemon thyme Absinthe Geranium

Scented oils and herbs : If you don’t feel like planting certain flowers, you can purchase dried lavender and rue to spread around your yard. Spraying this stuff in your yard will let cats know that the territory is already occupied by a bigger animal. Use a motion-activated sound device and keep food away: It helps to think like a cat to determine why it is coming on your property.

Content is for informational or entertainment purposes only and does not substitute for personal counsel or professional advice in business, financial, legal, or technical matters. I am damn tired of stray cats in my entire yard i tried to clean my place and sprinke domestos as the smell is very strong they’ll dissappear after two to three weeks they are back again leave stron smelly feases all over even on the bed of my lawn i am tired of flies and i cant even open my kitchen door please help me what to do or what to use as now all different cats come and go new ones as well i dont know what is attra ting them my biggest and most is the urine feases they leave. trapping cats seems to be the only way to fix this issue but owners are not getting the idea or simply don’t care.

since trap was used, cats continue to come back and I have chased them off when they are spotted – throwing whatever is available (including a lime which was pleasantly successful). If people are happy to let their cats roam, they are accepting whatever fate occurs to their animal. We had a lot of neighborhood cats coming into our yard and having kittens under our deck they didnt bother us until they started to come up on deck and eating the natural Fauna that was in the area for example cute little lizards and frogs that we enjoyed having.

So we got a small animal trap put some food in there and we caught one kitten every couple days and we relocated them far enough that they would not come back. One time we cought the father which was a huge black cat and when we lifted the trap to put it in the car to relocate him he panicked and somehow squeezed out of the trap and he is around the neighborhood making a lot of kittens again and now we have more and more cats around the neighborhood I am looking for a repellent to keep them away from my area. I’ve thought of trapping them for one of the “working cat” programs where they are provided to businesses that use them to eliminate rodent problems.

have used so many things spraying solutions, plants is there anything that sound will keep them away, I do not have food, or any shelter for them, they are all over at 15 of them, and the neighbors feed them but claim they are not theirs, there should be a law that will deter this, instead of us having to spend so money to get rid of them, pls. if you like fishing go catch a puffa fish be careful as they are poisoness dont touch them take them off the hook usine gloves or news paper put them in a plastic bag take home and freeze them cut up into little pieces and drop them where the cats roam outcome no more cats This cat comes to my yard everytime my dog is outside doing their business and gets her all rowled up then it scurries away.

I work nights and now I’m reduced to sleeping on my couch in the living room because I don’t want to wake up at some point to a cat on my window ledge. How many people visiting this site or reading the comments have talked to your local and/or state legislators concerning cat ownership? Cat owners should have to follow the dame rules, regulations, and laws of those who have dogs as pets.

Licensing, must be kept on your property or leashed when out doors, and if your pet cat is found running at large it will be subject to pick-up by local animal control officers and owners will have to pay a claiming fee. I belong to a garden club and I gave a report on bird kills by wind turbines. So, although this site is for suggestions to keep cats out off and off of your property, the real solution to the problem is through legislation and the trap/neuter-spay programs to cut down on the feral population.

Help me catch the feral cats that defecate every day in my half acre garden. Im thinking of letting my Siberian Husky out of the dog run when the little devil is in the back yard! without harming them what is the best repelant to use to keep them away & also the lady would get put off as her cats won’t enter.

Im sorry, but a super soaker only works if you are standing guard over your yard day and night. I just laid new sod 6 days ago and as of today, we have picked up 15 piles of cat crap. It has scratched about a quarter inch through the wood across a wide area at the top of my porch steps!

I use a box non kill trap with tuna or milk catch them and offer to sell them back to neighbor for 500 bucks each if they dont pay and they never have I relocate cat about 50 miles away A responsible owner does not let their animals run or roam freely like cats do. Most people don’t understand – let their cats roam and crap and urinate and we suffer from it.

I spoke to our enemy (she’s one of two owners) who laughed that a neighbor told her about one of her cats who craps and urinates over her yard. Princess left a dent in the top of my car and Simba got stuck in our garage and pissed on a number of items that had to be tossed. If any of you can think of a way to use “heavier” balls to hit the cats (I can’t do a sling shot at my age), let me know.

I don’t blame people for hating outdoor cats but they should focus their anger on the owners. I have a major cat problem the neighbours across the road have over 25 cats there always on the road in my front yard shitting everywhere this has been a constant battle as they breed like rabbbits none are desexed or micro chipped the local council is useless why isnt there cat laws to to keep them in side the owners are unaproachable i have tried every thing the only thing that works is my water sprinkler the whole street is pissed off yet the owners still wont do anything next option air rifle silencer and scope cats are a bloody pain in the arse So needless to say, I’m at the end of my rope with the neighbors 3 cats that roam the neighborhood, laying on people’s cars, pooping and pissing everywhere, DESTROYING my front lawn that I have been trying to bring back to life after drought season last year.

The Animal shelter said Mothballs are harmful to cats … Will not Hurt them Buy they hate it it will KEEP them away I bought loads of ground pepper in Aldi and sprinkled on the lawn – this has worked a treat. Good info for us that are trying to expand our green-thumbs and want our gardens to grow without the overflow of stray cats wandering amongst our flower-beds!

Whether its a friendly feral cat or your own pet, felines can wreak havoc on your outdoor space. Learn the tips and tricks that will keep cats from doing their business in your garden, and scaring birds and other wildlife away.

Cats are born hunters, which helps keep the rodent and pest population down in your yard, but their predatory behavior may scare away the birds that are inhabiting (and naturally pollinating) your veggies and flowers. Once mixed, spray it on bushes, poisonous plants , fence posts, and anything other items or areas you dont want disturbed by cats.

Some cat repellent manufacturers produce granular versions of their products too, which work particularly as protective barriers around the propertys perimeter.

Community cats, also called feral cats, are unowned cats who live outdoors. Like indoor cats, they belong to the domestic cat species (felis catus). However, community cats are generally not socialized, or friendly, to people, and are therefore unadoptable. They live full, healthy lives with their feline families, called colonies, in their outdoor homes.

Like all animals, community cats settle where food and shelter are available, and they are naturally skilled at finding these on their own. Trap-Neuter-Return (TNR) is the humane, effective, and mainstream approach to addressing community cat populations.

In a TNR program, community cats are humanely trapped, brought to a veterinarian to be spayed or neutered, vaccinated, eartipped (the universal sign that a cat is part of a TNR program), and then returned to their outdoor homes. Adult cats who are socialized can be adopted, but they can also be returned outdoors, where they will continue to thrive. The Vacuum Effect has been documented worldwide in many species, including community cats.

Animal controls typical approach has been to catch and kill community cats. Other cats move into the newly available territory and continue to breedthis phenomenon is called the Vacuum Effect. TNR is the only effective and humane approach to address community cat populations.

Reason: It is a cats natural instinct to dig in soft or loose soil, moss, mulch, or sand. Make an outdoor litter box away from your garden by tilling the soil or placing sand in an out-of-the-way spot in your yard. You can also set chicken wire firmly into the dirt (roll sharp edges under), arrange branches or sticks in a lattice pattern, or put wooden or plastic fencing over soil.

Each mat has flexible plastic spikes that are harmless to cats and other animals but discourage digging. Cover exposed ground in flower beds with large river rocks to prevent cats from digging. Shift the cats food source to a less central location, where you wont mind if they hang out.

Apply fragrances that deter cats around the edges of your yard, the tops of fences, and on any favorite digging areas or plants.

1. Citrus

Citrus smells, whether it’s lemon, orange, or grapefruit, are sure to turn away any cat—even the most curious feline. It’s a good thing, too, seeing as these fruits contain ingredients that are toxic to them. Besides the acidity being irritating to them, the essential oils and the psoralen are toxic compounds that can cause vomiting, diarrhea, depression, and potentially dermatitis, as the psoralen is phototoxic. Use with caution.

2. Apple Cider Vinegar

Apple cider vinegar is also acidic and can cause skin irritation if an inquisitive cat gets too close. The odor will deter the animal, but like citrus, it can cause more harm than good. It can cause damage to their digestive system if large amounts of undiluted apple cider vinegar are ingested. Hopefully, the strong smell is enough to send a nuisance feline out of the area. Be careful when using it since it can also hurt plants.

3. Gravel

If you know where the rogue cat is entering your yard, it’ll give you the ammunition for another effective deterrent. Cats are sensitive to the surfaces on which they walk. Try putting pea gravel at the spot. It’ll feel just like it would for you to tread on it with bare feet. It’ll hurt! The advantage of this method is that it is non-toxic. You can even use it to spruce up your landscaping.

4. String

If you have a fenced-in yard, you know that it isn’t a barrier to a cat. However, you can make it harder for them to get inside by running string along the top. It will surprise them, first of all. That might be all that it takes. It’ll also put them off balance, which will make your backyard even more uninviting to a curious feline.

5. Secured Garbage Cans

If feral cats are raiding your garbage, you have two options. One, you can keep the cans inside of your garage if you have them. The other thing you can do is to secure them with clips or bungee cords. Without the opposable thumb that raccoons have, this trick will put up a formidable barrier that will make your yard less welcoming to hungry felines. In a pinch, use bricks or cement blocks.

6. Flowers

Cats vary in their sensitivity to different smells. You may have luck planting flowers with a pungent scent, such as geraniums or marigolds. Try putting them in areas where the intruders are entering your backyard. You can combine this tip with our previous one about gravel to make it even more unappealing for your feline visitors. However, you should keep in mind that geraniums are classified as toxic to dogs and cats, as the essential oils can cause gastrointestinal upset, ataxia, muscle weakness, and in larger exposures, depression or hypothermia.

7. Squirrel Baffles

Cats are just as attracted to the birdfeeder as squirrels. Luckily, the baffle you install to keep these seed-loving pests away can also deter cats. Likewise, put the feeder away from trees or other access points to make it more difficult for them to harass the birds that you’re trying to attract. You can also use an upside-down foil pan.

8. Water

It doesn’t get much simpler than this home remedy. You don’t have to be around a cat long to learn that they don’t like getting wet. Therefore, one of the easiest and safest ways to keep them away is with a spray bottle or squirt gun. Just a little spritz is all it takes. If it’s your pet you’re trying to keep off the countertop, try to hit her when she’s not facing you. Some pets are sensitive to this kind of discipline.

Keep Stray Cats Away

As much as we may adore cats, stray and feral felines can be detrimental to your yard if they make a habit of visiting and staying. They can make your yard their personal litter box, attack any pets, and spread parasites and fleas. This article will offer some advice on how to dissuade stray cats from invading your yard.

Solutions That Worked for Me

There are numerous things you can put in your yard that can keep feral cats away. All of these are natural repellents that are safe to use.

Spray—or lay—a cat repellent.

Cat repellents contain ingredients that smell and taste repugnant to cats. There are indoor and outdoor formulas, so it’s important to get the right type. Liquid outdoor cat repellents usually come in a concentrated formula that requires diluting before use. Once mixed, spray it on bushes, poisonous plants, fence posts, and anything other items or areas you don’t want disturbed by cats. Outdoor sprays usually last for a week or more before they have to be reapplied. Some cat repellent manufacturers produce granular versions of their products too, which work particularly as protective barriers around the property’s perimeter.

Set a motion-activated sprinkler.

Most cats hate water. They hate surprise water ambushes even more, which is why motion-activated sprinklers are a great way to get the jump on stealthy cats. These sprinklers’ sensors begin spraying water when they detect motion within a 30- to 40-foot radius. Some models are equipped with an infrared sensor that makes them less likely to turn on when leaves or debris tumble past. This is one cat deterrent that must be planned carefully: No one wants to spray an unsuspecting neighbor if they get too close to the property line, or a delivery person dropping off packages.

Use ultrasonic devices.

Ultrasonic cat deterrents have motion and/or infrared sensors that emit ultrasonic frequencies that cats don’t like. Some of these devices also have strobe lights or predator calls to further deter cats and other animals from entering the property. One study showed that these devices reduced the frequency of cat visits by about 46 percent. These ultrasonic pest repellers are a particularly good option if you’re plagued by critters other than cats too, because opossums, raccoons, and rodents are all deterred by the ultrasonic sound.

Put away all possible enticements.

Another way to keep cats from hanging out in your yard is to ensure there’s nothing to attract them to your outdoor space. Cats are attracted to the scent of food, so try feeding pets elsewhere—and bring the food indoors at night. Keep outdoor grills and barbecues well cleaned, removing charred food that attracts unwanted yard visitors. Secure garbage cans and recycling bins so cats cannot easily pick through them. Because the bird seed in bird feeders attracts birds, and birds attract cats, you might also put the feeder away for a while until the cat problem is under control.

What is a community cat?

Community cats, also called feral cats, are unowned cats who live outdoors. Like indoor cats, they belong to the domestic cat species (Cats living outdoors is nothing new. It wasn’t until kitty litter was invented in the late 1940s that some cats began living strictly indoors. But community cats truly thrive in their outdoor homes. The tips in this brochure will help you coexist with community cats.

What is Trap-Neuter-Return?

In a TNR program, community cats are humanely trapped, brought to a veterinarian to be spayed or neutered, vaccinated, eartipped (the universal sign that a cat is part of a TNR program), and then returned to their outdoor homes. Kittens less than 8 weeks old can be socialized and then adopted. Adult cats who are socialized can be adopted, but they can also be returned outdoors, where they will continue to thrive.TNR improves cats’ lives and provides an effective, humane, and collaborative way for communities to coexist with cats. To learn more, including how to conduct TNR, visit alleycat.org/TNR.

Cats get in your trash.

Feeding stations provide cats with a designated area to eat. Find tips for building or buying feeding stations at alleycat.org/FeedingStations.
1. Secure your trash can with a tight lid or bungee cords. This will protect your trash from wildlife as well.2. Find out if neighbors are feeding the cats. If they are, make sure they are following best practices. Learn more at alleycat.org/BestPractices.3. Consider feeding the cats yourself if you find no regular caregiver. Feeding cats using best practices will help ensure they don’t get hungry enough to get into trash.

Cats dig in your garden.

1. Put out fragrances that keep cats away. Scatter fresh orange or lemon peels. Wet coffee grounds—which you may be able to get for free from coffee houses and fast food chains—and metal pans filled with vinegar also deter cats.2. Make an outdoor litter box away from your garden by tilling the soil or placing sand in an out-of-the-way spot in your yard. Clean the area frequently.3. Use plastic carpet runners, spike-side up, covered lightly in soil. They can be found at hardware or office supply stores. You can also set chicken wire firmly into the dirt (roll sharp edges under), arrange branches or sticks in a lattice pattern, or put wooden or plastic fencing over soil.4. Get the Cat Scat Mat, a non-chemical cat deterrent consisting of plastic mats that are cut into smaller pieces and pressed into the soil (pictured). Each mat has flexible plastic spikes that are harmless to cats and other animals but discourage digging.5. Get motion-activated sprinklers.6. Cover exposed ground in flower beds with large river rocks to prevent cats from digging. Rocks have the added benefit of deterring weeds.

Feeding cats attracts insects and wildlife.

1. Feed the cats at the same time and location each day. They should be given only enough food to finish in one sitting. If another person is caring for the cats, ask them to follow these guidelines. For more colony care guidelines, visit alleycat.org/ColonyCare.2. Keep the feeding area neat and free of leftover food and trash.