How to Identify a Baby Copperhead Snake?

Copperheads are one of the most commonly encountered venomous snakes in the southeastern United States. Unlike many species that are unable to cope with human altered habitats, copperheads often thrive in disturbed areas. Copperhead bites are serious, but fatalities are exceedingly rare, and the shy snakes will only bite if you handle or step on them. Identify baby copperheads by observing several different criteria, including their pattern, tail tip and body shape.

Instead, use the color pattern, tail tip and body shape of a snake to identify baby copperheads from a safe distance. On top of their ground color, copperheads have dark brown, lateral markings that are roughly triangular in most subspecies; these triangles sometimes touch along the midline of the back creating an hourglass-like pattern.

The Osage copperheads color is usually intermediate between the northern and southern subspecies, but their dark pattern elements have white borders. The young animals put the tips to good use: Lying camouflaged within the leaf litter, the snakes will entice frogs and lizards into striking range by wiggling their tails in a manner that suggests a small worm or caterpillar.

What do copperhead snake babies look like?

The baby copperheads are about seven to eight inches long. The coloration is very similar to the adults in they are usually light brown or reddish in appearance. Just be warned, some younger snakes can appear dark gray. But there are some other subtle differences that make the juvenile snakes easy to spot.

What snake is commonly mistaken for a copperhead?

Eastern Ratsnake (A.K.A. Blackrat Snake) The most common snake misidentified as a copperhead is the harmless juvenile Eastern Ratsnake (formerly called the blackrat snake). The Eastern Ratsnake starts life with a strong pattern of gray or brown blotches on a pale gray background.

What do baby copperheads look like when they're first born?

Look At Their Tail-Tip Color. Many baby copperhead snakes are born with a bright yellow or green tip to their tail. This bright color is used to attract and lure prey to enter within striking distance. … Normally after one year their tail will turn dark brown or in some cases even black.

The centers for disease control estimate that 7,000 8,000 people are bitten by venomous snakes each year. Copperheads are responsible for more bites than any other venomous snake.

In this guide we will teach you seven easy ways to identify this snake, how to safely remove them and how to prevent them from getting in your yard. The biggest myth is that juveniles cannot control their venom and therefore bite with a larger amount than adults.

However many nonvenomous snakes mimic this appearance by flattening their heads and extending their jaws. Many baby copperhead snakes are born with a bright yellow or green tip to their tail. This bright color is used to attract and lure prey to enter within striking distance.

These snakes have a pale, pinkish-tan color and their heads are a remarkable copper tone ( giving them their name ). However, after a steady food source is found, they quickly grow to and have a thick body. A copperhead at 24 inches may be as thick as the circle formed when touching your pointer finger and thumb together.

This last identification method is best left to experts because it is extremely hard ( and never recommended ) to flip a potentially dangerous snake over and examine its tail. In a nonvenomous snake, the scutes after the vent are divided into two, giving a zipper appearance. In venomous snakes, there are single, elongated scales past the vent.

Similar SnakesJuvenile Eastern Rat Snake This species is normally gray and black with large spots over the spine. These spots do not meet the sides of the belly, unlike the hourglass above.Juvenile Mole King SnakeMole Kings typically have gray or tan base colors with dark reddish-brown spots over their spines. As they age, they turn almost fully brown.You should now be able to identify and avoid mistaking other snakes for this species.

However, if it needs to be moved, or you feel more comfortable with knowing the snake isnt near your yard follow the steps below. If you live in Copperhead country, it is useful to invest in snake handling devices. Your hook should be at least 3 feet long or more to create a safe zone between you and the snake.

To use a hook, gently take the pointed end and slide it underneath the middle of the baby copperhead. Place the snake in a large bucket or tub to move it to a desired location. Grab sticks are very effective in picking up a snake and holding it securely.

Slide the bottom arm of the clamp under the center of the snakes body. Avoid squeezing the clamp too hard or too quickly, as this can sometimes break the snakes back or ribs. Handling a snake in these areas can cause damage to the spine or neck, permanently injure or even kill.

If you are surprised to find a baby copperhead in your yard, and do not have a hook or grab stick, there are alternative tools you can use. The key is to maintain a safe distance and avoid injuring the snake. This gives you plenty of space to create a safe zone around the snake.

Step back and give the snake time to calm down before trying to capture again. A regularly mowed lawn will deter most snakes from wanting to travel across it. If you happen to step on a traveling venomous snake it is likely to ruin your day.

People who repeatedly find snakes in their yards typically have accidentally given them housing by allowing their grass to grow. Walk around the base of your house and look for any hole they could go in (they look for cool, dark places to hide during the heat of the day). Many people ignore bushes when doing yardwork because they tend to hide the underbrush that collects beneath them.

Never use commercial traps as they are normally unsuccessful and the crushing mechanism can severely injure the snake. If you identify a snake as a baby copperhead, remember to keep your three feet safe zone! When attempting to remove them make sure to use safe methods and tools such as hooks, grab sticks, or shovels.

Lastly, you should prevent them from nesting in your yard by keeping a well maintained lawn, removing clutter and filling in holes.

First, we’ll take a look at Eastern Copperheads and point out their most identifying characteristics. Copperheads are born alive and with the exception of the tail tip, they are colored and patterned the same as adults. The following four photographs are of baby/juvenile Eastern Copperheads. Note the sulfur yellow colored tail tip. The yellow tail tip is used as a lure for frogs, lizards and other prey items. As the snake ages the bright tail tip fades. The only other Virginia snake with a bright yellowish to yellowish green tail tip is the venomous eastern cottonmouth.

All harmless snakes in Virginia have round pupils and lack the heat sensing pits. Another characteristic of all Virginia’s venomous snakes is the single row of scales on the underside of the tail after the anal plate (vent).

Around late August to mid October depending on the temperatures, Eastern Ratsnakes look for a nice warm place to wait out the upcoming winter. Juvenile Northern Black Racers usually do not seek winter refuge in human occupied dwellings. This is completely opposite of the pattern found on the copperhead (wide on the sides and narrow near the back bone).

Some adult Northern Watersnakes retain a strong, distinct juvenile pattern while others become a uniformed brown. In an effort to ward off predators these snakes will puff-up, hiss loudly, spread their neck and strike with the mouth closed. Eastern hognose snakes prefer sandy soil and primarily feed on toads.

Venomous Eastern CopperheadHarmless Red CornsnakeEastern Copperhead vs. Northern Mole Kingsnake Juvenile Northern Mole Kingsnakes have a strong pattern that usually, but not always fades to a uniformed brown as the snake ages. Northern Mole Kingsnakes are seldom seen out in the open and are general found under surface cover (plywood, tin, flat rocks, etc..).

How to identify a baby copperhead snake? and What does a baby copperhead look like? are some of the most common questions that people have when it comes to identifying this species.

Parents and guardians can also benefit from the peace of mind when passing this knowledge to their children so that they, too, can learn how to keep a keen eye when going out for a walk. Here are some of the most important things you should know about baby copperhead snakes and how to handle them when you spot them.

Pythons and Boas are totally safe to handle and are no danger to humans. This copper coloration tends to extend throughout the body, and sometimes these snakes will have a less defined stripe marking. A lot of snakes in the US have a brownish color, hence the difficulty identifying copperheads with an untrained eye.

Northern Copperhead, Agkistrodon contortrix is a venomous pit viper found in Eastern North America Copperhead snakes are common in large parts of the United States. You are likely to spot a copperhead baby closer to habitats where they are found naturally. Babies and adults are commonly found in Texas, Missouri, or Georgia , North Carolina, and along the entire East Coast of the United States .

There are also instances of baby copperhead snakes found in unnatural areas where they might have escaped from captivity or during transit. Do not forget the possibility of encountering venomous snakes outside of their usual territory. Moreover, a bite from a juvenile could be fatal to people with a compromised immunity or smaller children.

When it comes to baby copperhead snakes , they are more likely to be seen during the last half of the year from September forward. A bite could lead to permanent tissue and nerve damage or even worse. If you think you have been bitten by a snake (but you arent sure which type), seek immediate medical attention.

If you think you have spotted the type of snake which administered the bite, the same answer is true. The fact you are able to identify the type of snake to the medical team means that you will receive the correct treatment much faster. Snake identification is vital, and more information is at the disposal of the medical team to adminster the right treatment when you can identify what happened.

If you have been bitten by a baby copperhead snake, the most important thing to remember is not to panic. Increasing the breathing and heart rate only means that any venom actually administered by the snake moves through your system faster. A great deal of what youll read about snake bite first-aid relies on finding treatment as soon as possible after the event and staying calm until such help arrives.

Swelling tends to increase, and damage to muscle, tissue and nerves due to the venom (where injected) is likely. Delays in medical treatment leads to an increase in the amount of damage the venom has timem to cause. Infection control, swelling reduction and keeping vital signs steady are the most important factors when a snake bite is being medically treated.

An increasing amount of research points to the fact that baby copperhead snake bites are no more dangerous than that of an adult. The next important things to cover when it comes to baby copperhead snakes is how to identify them. How to spot the difference between an adult and a juvenile baby copperhead snake.

But first, here are the key factors youll want to look out for when identifying a baby copperhead snake: Nearly all venomous snake species found in North America have a spade shaped head. Due to the markings and coloration being approximately similar, its an easy mistake.

This little baby copperhead is dead center of the tree you can see the spade shaped head. The tiny slits of the eye of a copperhead are unique to the viper family of snakes. So, if you find one of these fellas in your back yard, under a structure (like a shed or some rocks), chances are you could have a den of copperheads on your property.

reddit.com | u/AssroniaRicardoThis image of a juvenile copperhead snake really shows their markings and semi-stripe pattern. Its pretty clear as to why they adopted their common name due to the copper tone of their head. These unsuspecting office goers were met with an unpleasant venomous snake surprise one morning.

Copperhead snakes have a primary coloration that ranges between beige and brown. Generally, the belly is beige to darker but because copperhead snakes tend to move around when scared or startled, you might have better luck looking at some of their other physical features. You can seehow this baby copperhead is attracting a frog with its bright greenish yellow tail.When they get older, the green tail fades away.

The best way to remove a baby copperhead from your property is to call an expert. While these snakes arent that dangerous, a bite from one will most certainly result in a hospital visit. A den could be under a trashcan, fallen log, elevated shed, wooden porch, etc.

So, if you reduce the amount of den areas on your property, that will lower the chances of baby copperheads showing up. Keep your grass cut and yard in shape Remove any downed trees or large branches Seal off any areas like underneath a porch or shed Remove any large obstructions that a snake may want to burrow under Snake handling is a mixture of experience and knowledge and learning how to do it safely comes with time.

If you encounter a baby copperhead snake anywhere, the single best thing that you can do is leave it be. Juvenile copperhead snakes can be found all over the United States, although they are more prevalent in warmer areas. So, youll likely run into this venomous snake more in the late summer early fall.

Some of the more specific places where baby copperheads can be found: Texas, Georgia, North Carolina and surrounding states. Remember that there is always a possibility of encountering snakes in areas that are not their natural habitat. Some types of snake species (such as the rinkhals) will fake being dead when attacked or startled, remaining motionless until someone gets too close.

Lastly, its a best practice to treat a dead copperhead with just as much respect and care as you would a live snake. You now should know all the info necessary to easily identify both baby and adult copperhead snakes.

Copperhead Basics

Five different subspecies of the copperhead inhabit North America. Northern copperheads (Agkistrodon contortrix mokasen) live throughout the low mountains and piedmont of the southeastern United States, while southern copperheads (A. c. contortix) inhabit the coastal plain of the Southeastern United States. Moving west, Osage copperheads (A. c. phaeogaster) range throughout Missouri, Kansas and parks of Oklahoma. The broad-banded copperhead (A. c. laticinctus) replaces the Osage copperhead to the south of its range. The Trans-Pecos copperhead (A. c. pictigaster) lives only in southwest Texas. Integration between the subspecies is common along adjacent portions of their range; an individual specimen may resemble either of the discrete subspecies or a combination thereof.

Identification Near and Far

Copperheads have elliptical eyes, facial pits and a single row of subcaudal scales, but observing these traits requires you to have close interaction with a potentially dangerous animal. Instead, use the color pattern, tail tip and body shape of a snake to identify baby copperheads from a safe distance. Amateurs should never approach or handle a copperhead. This extends to dead animals as well; dead venomous snakes may bite reflexively for hours after death.

Color Pattern

In general, copperheads have beige, brown or tan ground colors. On top of their ground color, copperheads have dark brown, lateral markings that are roughly triangular in most subspecies; these triangles sometimes touch along the midline of the back creating an hourglass-like pattern. Southern copperheads are the palest subspecies, and have the thinnest hourglasses — a high number of which do not meet along the mid line. Northern copperheads are the darkest subspecies, and have relatively thick hourglasses that connect more frequently than those of the southern subspecies do. The Osage copperhead’s color is usually intermediate between the northern and southern subspecies, but their dark pattern elements have white borders. The triangular markings of the broad-banded and Trans-Pecos copperheads have evolved into wide, sometimes broken, bands. It can be difficult to distinguish between these two subspecies at a distance. The juveniles of all subspecies are often several shades lighter in color than the adults are. The head of copperheads can vary from tan to dark brown.

Tail Tips

Young copperheads have bright yellow tail tips. The young animals put the tips to good use: Lying camouflaged within the leaf litter, the snakes will entice frogs and lizards into striking range by wiggling their tails in a manner that suggests a small worm or caterpillar. The tails become brown as the animals mature, and their menu of potential prey increases. Copperheads of all ages will vibrate their tails rapidly in the leaf litter when frightened, but this behavior is common among many nonvenomous species as well.

How To Identify A Baby Copperhead

There are many myths surrounding venomous snakes.The biggest myth is that juveniles cannot control their venom and therefore bite with a larger amount than adults. This is false!The second myth is that all venomous snakes have triangular heads.Pit vipers do have triangular heads as this is necessary to accommodate their venom glands. However many nonvenomous snakes mimic this appearance by flattening their heads and extending their jaws.Also, many snakes have perfectly narrow heads but are venomous. A good example is the Coral Snake. These tiny snakes are the 2nd deadliest in the world!To help you identify this snake we have put together seven easy steps you can take.

1. Look At Their Tail-Tip Color

Many baby copperhead snakes are bornThis bright color is used to attract and lure prey to enter within striking distance. This helps babies find food and grow quickly.Normally after one year their tail will turn dark brown or in some cases even black.

2. Look For An Hourglasses Pattern

These snakes have a pale, pinkish-tan color and their heads are a remarkable copper tone (giving them their name).Copperheads have a distinct pattern that stays uniform throughout their lives.Their markings are dark brown in color. The bands are thin over their spine and widen as they approach the sides of the belly. When observed from above,The belly is white with dark brownish-red spots.

3. They Have Facial Pits

Copperheads are a member of the pit viper family.Pit vipers have a pair of heat sensors either side of their face between the eye and nostril.Snake eyesight is notoriously poor. Without these glands finding prey by motion alone would be very difficult. Heat sensing allows them to see the world in infrared.Pits are obvious in close-up pictures, however, you will need to get very close to a baby copperhead to be able to see its pits.

4. They Have Vertical (Slitted) Pupils

Most venomous snakes are known for their “cat-eye” pupils.The pupils are slitted vertically, unlike the round pupils of nonvenomous snakes.They haveThough beautiful to look at, they are best observed from a picture.

5. Do They Have Keeled Scales?

Keeled scales are raised scales that give snakes a rough texture. The scales have a ridge down the center that create a raised triangle shape.
It can be hard to tell if a snake has keeled scales without touching.Unless you have had proper training for handling venomous snakes it is not recommended to attempt handling.You should instead rely on their pattern, tail and other features apparent from a distance.

7. Look For Post-Vent Scutes

This last identification method is best left to experts because it is extremely hard (Most snakes become frantic and try to strike if you flip them over.However, this isScutes are the long, straight scales that line the bellies of snakes and help with locomotion.In a nonvenomous snake, the scutes after the vent are divided into two, giving a “zipper” appearance. In venomous snakes, there are single, elongated scales past the vent.

Snakes Commonly Confused For Copperheads

The United States has over 125 species of snakes. Many are often confused for copperheads because they look similar. The most common lookalikes are:You should now be able to identify and avoid mistaking other snakes for this species.It is now time to remove and prevent this snake from entering your yard.

How To Safely Remove Baby Copperheads

You have found a snake in your yard and have determined it is a Copperhead, what’s next?If it is near the edge of your yard, it will likely slither away on its own without intervention. So observe or walk away.Most snakes will just be passing through.However, if it needs to be moved, or you feel more comfortable with knowing the snake isn’t near your yard follow the steps below.

Use A Hook

If you live in Copperhead country, it is useful to invest in snake handling devices.This is the safest and least harmful way to handle the snake. Your hook should be at least 3 feet long or more to create a “safe zone” between you and the snake.To use a hook, gently take the pointed end and slide it underneath the middle of the baby copperhead.They are known to be fickle on hooks, so it may help to gently vibrate the hook to make them want to hold on.Place the snake in a large bucket or tub to move it to a desired location.If the snake keeps slipping off the hook, it may be necessary to use a clamp stick.

Alternative Tools To Use

Grab sticks are very effective in picking up a snake and holding it securely.A grab stick works the same way a trash grabber works, it just has a more snake-friendly clamp. The handle has a trigger that is connected to a pulley that closes the clamp.To pick up the snake:Do not grab the neck or tail region with either a hook or clamp! Handling a snake in these areas can cause damage to the spine or neck, permanently injure or even kill.

Copperheads and Similar Looking Harmless Species

First, we’ll take a look at Eastern Copperheads and point out their most identifying characteristics. Copperheads are born alive and with the exception of the tail tip, they are colored and patterned the same as adults. The following four photographs are of baby/juvenile Eastern Copperheads. Note the sulfur yellow colored tail tip. The yellow tail tip is used as a lure for frogs, lizards and other prey items. As the snake ages the bright tail tip fades. The only other Virginia snake with a bright yellowish to yellowish green tail tip is the venomous eastern cottonmouth.* Click on a thumbnail to see a larger versionEastern Copperheads have dark colored crossbands that are for the most part shaped like an hourglass. Usually some of the crossbands are broken and do not connect.The Eastern Copperhead is a pit-viper, as are all three of Virginia’s venomous snake species (Eastern Copperhead, eastern cottonmouth and timber rattlesnake). The “pit” in pit-viper refers to the heating sensing pit located between the eye and the nostrils on the snake‘s head. In addition to the heat sensing pit all three venomous snakes in Virginia have vertical pupils. All harmless snakes in Virginia have round pupils and lack the heat sensing pits. Another characteristic of all Virginia’s venomous snakes is the single row of scales on the underside of the tail after the anal plate (vent).While close inspection of a snake‘s face and/or its bum is a definitive way to distinguish a venomous snake from a harmless species, it requires one to get dangerously close to a potently dangerous animal. It is far better to learn the pattern and coloration of a few snakes so that a specimen may be identified from a safe distance.

Eastern Copperhead vs. Northern Black Racer

Like the Eastern Ratsnake, black racers are also born with a blotched pattern. However, unlike the Eastern Ratsnake that may retain the juvenile pattern for several years, the pattern of the Northern Black Racer usually fades to a uniformed black within the first two years of life. Juvenile Northern Black Racers usually do not seek winter refuge in human occupied dwellings. Northern Black Racers are usually one of the first snakes to become active when spring arrives.

Eastern Copperhead vs. Northern Watersnake

Juvenile and subadult Northern Watersnakes have a pattern that can vary greatly in color, from dark grayish to a reddish brown. The color of some individuals watersnakes can come close to that of some copperheads, however the pattern on the Northern Watersnake is always narrow on the sides and wide near the backbone. This is completely opposite of the pattern found on the copperhead (wide on the sides and narrow near the back bone). Some adult Northern Watersnakes retain a strong, distinct juvenile pattern while others become a uniformed brown. As the name implies, the Northern Watersnake is usually found in close proximity to water.

Eastern Copperhead vs. Eastern Milksnake

The pattern of the Eastern Milksnake is fairly consistent in Virginia, however the intensity of the colors can vary quite a bit. Usually the blotches across the back are outlined in black. Eastern Milksnakes are found state wide, but are more abundant in the mountainous regions.

Eastern Copperhead vs. Eastern Hog-nosed Snake

Eastern Hog-nosed Snakes are the great actors of the snake world. In an effort to ward off predators these snakes will puff-up, hiss loudly, spread their neck and strike with the mouth closed. If all else fails the hognose snake will roll over and play dead. Found state wide the pattern and coloration of these snake can vary greatly. Eastern hognose snakes prefer sandy soil and primarily feed on toads.The pattern of the eastern hog-nosed snake can vary greatly

Eastern Copperhead vs. Red Cornsnake

The Red Cornsnake also known as the red ratsnake is usually more brightly colored and and has a more reddish hue than that of the copperhead. The pattern of the Red Cornsnake is a blotch that does not extend down the sides to the ground. Unlike the juvenile pattern of the Eastern Ratsnake that fades as the snake ages, the pattern of the Red Cornsnake remains distinct regardless of age.

The Most Important Basics of Copperhead Snakes

First, let’s talk about the copperhead snake itself.Here are some of the most important things you should know about baby copperhead snakes and how to handle them when you spot them.

Why are They Called Copperhead Snakes?

This species of snake is technically a type of viper, and fall under the same family as rattlesnakes and pit vipers. Further, the species derives their common name from the unique copper-colored head.Their head, along with many other venomous snakes, takes on a somewhat triangular shape.Don’t be fooled, though. Pythons and Boas are totally safe to handle and are no danger to humans.Copperheads unfortunately have a less defined spade shaped head. So, they are commonly mistaken for other species.As for the name “Copper”, that comes from the color of the scales on their head.Pretty on the nose, right?This copper coloration tends to extend throughout the body, and sometimes these snakes will have a less defined stripe marking.Sometimes, more or less the same description can be used for several different types of snakes. A lot of snakes in the US have a brownish color, hence the difficulty identifying copperheads with an untrained eye.

Why Look Out for Baby Copperhead Snakes?

All types of copperhead snakes are venomous. Even though their bite might not kill an adult human, it can pose very serious harm.Moreover, a bite from a juvenile could be fatal to people with a compromised immunity or smaller children.

What Happens when a Juvenile Copperhead Bites?

If you have been bitten by a baby copperhead snake, the most important thing to remember is not to panic.Always stay calm for as long as possible.Then seek medical attention.A great deal of what you’ll read about snake bite first-aid relies on finding treatment as soon as possible after the event and staying calm until such help arrives.Swelling is likely in the case of aIt’s also likely to be painful. Swelling tends to increase, and damage to muscle, tissue and nerves due to the venom (where injected) is likely. Delays in medical treatment leads to an increase in the amount of damage the venom has timem to cause.Never attempt to treat a snake bite yourself; this itself can prove to be fatal.Infection control, swelling reduction and keeping vital signs steady are the most important factors when a snake bite is being medically treated.

Corn Snakes

Due to the markings and coloration being approximately similar, it’s an easy mistake.But, corn snakes

Hognose Snakes

Hognose snakes are often confused for copperheads. But again, look carefully for distinguishing features that you won’t notice with copperheads.Simply put, hognose snakes are called hognoses due to the shape of their head.

Common Water Snakes

Water snakes on the other hand aren’t nearly as identical to a close-up copperhead if you take a look at someJust see above — this is a totally harmless common water snake. It does look like a copperhead, though.

Common Brown Snakes

Look dangerous?Well, guess again. This is just a common brown snake, and it’s totally harmless. A giveaway here is the lack of the hourglass pattern.

Pictures of Baby Copperheads and Adult Copperheads

Look closely.It’s pretty scary how well these little fellas can camouflage.This little baby copperhead is dead center of the tree — you can see the spade shaped head.That’s one of the best ways to identify a baby copperhead snake.Another great example of a picture of a baby copperhead. You can basically see the venom gland “pockets” toward the back of it’s head.Just look at those eyes.In this baby copperhead picture, the eyes are totally noticeable.The tiny slits of the eye of a copperhead are unique to the viper family of snakes. You’ll also commonly see the eyes in rattlesnakes.Don’t get too close, though.If you have to look at the eyes to determine whether it’s a copperhead or not, it’s best to stay clear so it doesn’t strike.This is the stuff of nightmares. A den of baby copperhead snakes.In this photo, you’ll see a common behavior of copperhead snakes. They tend to be social, and will often share dens with other copperheads.So, if you find one of these fellas in your back yard, under a structure (like a shed or some rocks), chances are you could have a den of copperheads on your property.At that point, it’s best to call an exterminator.This image of a juvenile copperhead snake really shows their markings and semi-stripe pattern.Note how the color of the head is slightly different than that of the body.It’s pretty clear as to why they adopted their common name due to the copper tone of their head.Not all of them have such defined stripes, though.Take a look at this one pictured above — it has a very unique pattern.This juvenile pictured above is on the prowl.Unfortunately, they are known to sneak inside. These unsuspecting office goers were met with an unpleasant venomous snake surprise one morning.But hey, at least they knew what it was!They don’t just sneak into offices.Occasionally, they sneak into garages as well. If that happens, it’s best to call an expert in who can remove the curious snake for you.Apparently, baby copperheads like to climb. Just look at the one in the image above.

Common Markings

Copperhead snakes have a primary coloration that ranges between beige and brown.Together with this, you can expect to see hourglass markings over the body.Sometimes, these hourglasses are closer to triangular markings in some specie. Also, you can expect to see borders around these hourglass markings. Many snakes of the same species can vary with patterns/looks, including copperheads.

Baby Copperhead Belly

Generally, the belly is beige to darker – but because copperhead snakes tend to move around when scared or startled, you might have better luck looking at some of their other physical features.

What the Tail Looks Like

If you think that you’ve spotted a baby, take a closer look at its tail.It’s one of the most important and characteristic markings that you should learn to look for which might help to distinguish theThe snake uses the tail as a means to catch prey: When snakes are hidden away, it might even resemble a wiggling bug.

Other Giveaways That identify a Baby Copperhead

Look at the eyes: Copperhead snakes have a slit in their eyes, one that can be likened to a cat.This is a distinguishing feature that not all types of snakes have, and that can help to set a baby copperhead snake apart from some of its most common counterparts.

Additional Facts about Copperheads

The best way to remove a baby copperhead from your property is to call an expert.While these snakes aren’t that dangerous, a bite from one will most certainly result in a hospital visit. It’s just not worth trying to remove them yourself if you don’t know what you’re doing.So what do you do if you spot a copperhead on your property?As for prevention, there are several steps you can take to reduce the likeliness of seeing them on your property.First, make sure all of your garage doors and entrances to your home are sealed. The last place you want a venomous snake is in your home.Also, copperheads really like to hang out with each other in ‘dens’. A den could be under a trashcan, fallen log, elevated shed, wooden porch, etc.So, if you reduce the amount of den areas on your property, that will lower the chances of baby copperheads showing up.Here are some best practices for keeping copperheads off of your property:And remember — if you see one juvenile copperhead snake on your property, chances are there could be more.

Where You’ll Likely Find Baby Copperheads

Juvenile copperhead snakes can be found all over the United States, although they are more prevalent in warmer areas.Juvenile copperhead snakes are more likely to appear during the later half of the year. Most commonly, they come out in September through the fall.Conditions are usually ideal for their hatching and growth during these months. So, you’ll likely run into this venomous snake moreSome of the more specific places where baby copperheads can be found:And if you guessed the Northern states, you’d be right.Remember that there is always a possibility of encountering snakes in areas that are not their natural habitat.Sometimes, snakes can escape captivity – and in theory, this can happen anywhere.

Do They Play Dead?

Some types of snake species (such as the rinkhals) will “fake” being dead when attacked or startled, remaining motionless until someone gets too close.Even though copperhead snakes aren’t known to habitually play dead in this way, anyone about to approach a snake should be extremely careful.

But wait — are Dead Ones Dangerous?

Deceased snakes, especially recent ones, are still able to execute a “bite”.After they die, snakes muscles can still have reflexes . For this reason, always be careful when handling or disposing off a dead snake.Especially if the dead snake is a venomous one.Lastly, it’s a best practice to treat a dead copperhead with just as much respect and care as you would a live snake.

Are they Musky?

Naturally, no copperheads do not emit a foul smell.But copperhead snakes can emit a musk that some say smells like cucumbers.Strange, right?