How to Get Rid of Cat Smell?

Its all fun and games until the cat pees in your house. Kitty tinkle is one of the most unique and pungent smells on the planet, perhaps rivaled only by the notorious durian fruit.

Follow general guidelines then also sprinkle baking soda on the stain, letting it sit for an hour or so before vacuuming it up. Follow general guidelines or use a DIY solution of hydrogen peroxide and water (1:2 ratio) or straight up undiluted white vinegar on the stain.

Enzymatic cleaners could potentially damage your unsealed floors, so test some in a subtle location before liberally using on the stain. If the cat pee stain and odor dont go away, you may have to bust out the sander because the urine couldve soaked into the wood. Think of the cat pee like its smallpox: The smell is super contagious and can be transferred to other clothes in the same laundry load and then youll need a whole new wardrobe.

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The heat will permanently set the stain and the odor by bonding the protein into any manmade fibers.” Dander is kind of like dandruff on cats and dogs: it’s the flaky stuff that mammals (birds, too) shed from their skin.

That means as much as you physically can, including all floor types, stairs, upholstered furniture, window coverings, whatever you can get to. Vinegar is as common as hen’s teeth, as the saying goes, useful in cooking and cleaning and with a pedigree dating back to the dawn of recorded history. The cleaning part of this fermented acid liquid comes from its acumen as a remover of smells, including cat pee.

(Interesting that baking soda is an alkaline, or base substance, and vinegar is a mild acid and, while opposites of a sort, they’re often used for the same cleaning purpose.) On the other hand, the Humane Society says that using a strong chemical odor remover like vinegar and ammonia could encourage your pet to mark that same spot again, something to keep in mind if the animal is still a resident. Lots of fabrics are notoriously adept at retaining smells of all kinds, including pet urine odor.

Replacing old, dirty filters will both get rid of the pet dander and help the whole system run more efficiently. If all those cleaning measures don’t work, sometimes the only choice is to replace carpet and padding and put a fresh coat of paint on everything. Unless they’re stuffed animals, your furry friends are going to continue their output, so if you’re responsible for the critters — that is, you’re living with them in that property — you might want to try to prevent further accidents.

This article was co-authored by Lauren Baker, DVM, PhD. Dr. Baker is a Veterinarian and PhD candidate in Comparative Biomedical Sciences. Dr. Baker received her Doctor of Veterinary Medicine from the University of Wisconsin in 2016, and went on to pursue a PhD through her work in the Comparative Orthopaedic Research Laboratory.

Stains that are set in their ways

Pet odor from set-in stains can be tough to deal with. You may want to hire or rent a carpet cleaner to extract as much of the problem as possible, and then follow that up with any well-reviewed carpet stain remover products for spots that remain. Those spots means there’s still stuff there that, whether they retain scent or not, can turn off the next potential resident.The Humane Society adds this caveat as one popular method that may not be so good as an odor eliminator:

Seek and destroy

Use your own nose, and/or someone else’s, to find the odors. A second opinion is particularly valuable since we can become pretty used to odors in our own house to the point that we simply don’t notice them. This phenomenon is known as going nose blind.And here’s another tip: black lights. They’re not just for posters from the 70s. Black light can be used to spot soiled areas that you can then outline with chalk or put string around or do something else non-permanent to mark where they are so you can deal with them in the light of day, or when you turn the lights back on. Shine the black light on baseboards, too. (More on that below.)

Getting their dander up

Dander is kind of like dandruff on cats and dogs: it’s the flaky stuff that mammals (birds, too) shed from their skin. People with allergies can be really sensitive to the presence of dander, and fur, for that matter.A good way to deal directly with dander is quite simply vacuuming. That means as much as you physically can, including all floor types, stairs, upholstered furniture, window coverings, whatever you can get to.Then, spread baking soda over what you can, and vacuum again in a few hours.On a personal note, I was living in a house for a few months that was half empty and on the market. We had a cat and a dog there but those guys were almost never on the second floor. Regardless, I would vacuum every day in every room, and still pulled up hair and probably dander from every room, every time.

The vagaries of vinegar

Vinegar is as common as hen’s teeth, as the saying goes, useful in cooking and cleaning and with a pedigree dating back to the dawn of recorded history. The cleaning part of this fermented acid liquid comes from its acumen as a remover of smells, including cat pee. (Interesting that baking soda is an alkaline, or base substance, and vinegar is a mild acid and, while opposites of a sort, they’re often used for the same cleaning purpose.)Here’s some advice on using vinegar as a pet odor remover: first, add about one part vinegar to two parts water in a spray bottle and test it on an inconspicuous area to make sure it won’t stain the area you actually want cleaned. Then spritz (don’t soak) and after a few minutes use folded paper towels to blot up the remaining liquid.On the other hand, the Humane Society says that using a strong chemical odor remover like vinegar and ammonia could encourage your pet to mark that same spot again, something to keep in mind if the animal is still a resident.

Washing the fabric smells away

Lots of fabrics are notoriously adept at retaining smells of all kinds, including pet urine odor. Baking soda is quite good at eliminating odors. Try adding a pound of baking soda to a standard box of your regular detergent.An enzymatic cleaner is good for this too if the baking soda hack doesn’t work. Either way, wash and rinse as usual and air dry if possible.

Let’s air this out

If you can, open every window, turn on every ceiling fan and the fan in your AC or central heating unit and air out the residence for as long as you feel is practical. This can be especially effective after a deep cleaning when a lot of stuff might be left floating around in the air.That’s also a good time to replace all the air filters. Replacing old, dirty filters will both get rid of the pet dander and help the whole system run more efficiently.

Enzymes and cat urine

Cat urine is very concentrated, very smelly, and can really hang around long after the producer of that urine odor is long gone. Compared to dog urine, the felines win this competition, paws down.Enzyme-based sprays are a good tool here, especially for flooring and baseboards. Technically speaking, they break down acids and neutralize bacteria. Non-technically speaking, they not only get rid of the odor, but if the cat is still around, they can even discourage re-marking in those same spots. Who wants pet stain déjà vu?In a different house than the one mentioned above, I had a cat — the same cat, and a personable fellow indeed — who apparently was not impressed with my litter box cleaning acumen. He instead would pee on baseboards in the sunroom. Being fairly nose blind, I didn’t realize that for a couple years — actually it was discovered by a new roommate who’s now my spouse — and it provided a memory of him for long after he went to kitty heaven before we discovered the source of the smell. What finally got rid of that smell? We painted the baseboards.

Painting, repairs, and replacements

If all those cleaning measures don’t work, sometimes the only choice is to replace carpet and padding and put a fresh coat of paint on everything. Here’s a blog on how you can use paint — and a recommendation for some — to cover odors once and for all.Of course, that’s the most expensive way to go, and indeed, that’s why many a property manager requires pet fees and extra security deposits for tenants who want to keep pets inside the property.(And here’s a Millionacres article about whether landlords want to allow them in the first place.)

Finally, an ounce of prevention

Unless they’re stuffed animals, your furry friends are going to continue their output, so if you’re responsible for the critters — that is, you’re living with them in that property — you might want to try to prevent further accidents.That’s why cleaning is so important. Cats and dogs, of course, recognize their own scent and might continue to use those spots they previously marked. A thorough cleaning not only gets rid of the pet urine stain, but helps lessen that spot’s appeal. Plus, retraining may be in order. Consult your vet or dog trainer or another expert on that topic.